Sanja Matsuri 2017 – 三社祭 (Video)

21. May 2017

Am Rande des großen Festes: Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
On the outskirts of the great festival: A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears

Vorgestern habe ich ja schon auf das diesjährige Sanja-Matsuri (eines der ganz großen Sommerfestivals in Tōkyō) hingewiesen, das heute Abend seinen Abschluss gefunden hat. Und weil sich vor ein paar Jahren mein Video einer furiosen taiko (japanische Trommel)-Darbietung so großer Beliebtheit erfreut hat, gibt es heute eine Neuauflage davon – sieben Jahre später, aber kein bisschen lahmer. Genießen Sie es in vollen Zügen!

On the day before yesterday I posted a hint regarding this year’s Sanja-Matsuri (one of the big summer festivals in Tōkyō) that has come to an end tonight. And because my video of a rather frantic taiko (Japanese drum) performance attracted quite some people some years ago, it is time for an update. Seven years later – but as stunning as before. Enjoy it!

Wie man hinkommt:
Am einfachsten kommt man mit den U-Bahnlinien “Ginza-sen” (銀座線 / ぎんざせん) oder “Asakusa-sen” (浅草線 / あさくさせん) zur Station “Asakusa” (浅草 / あさくさ).

How to get there:
The easiest way is by subway lines “Ginza-sen” (銀座線 / ぎんざせん) or “Asakusa-sen” (浅草線 / あさくさせん) to Station “Asakusa”-station (浅草 / あさくさ).

Wenn Sie mehr über das Sanja Matsuri erfahren möchten, sehen Sie auch:
If you want to learn more about the Sanja Matsuri, please also have a look at:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr
A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Möchten Sie auch das Video von 2010 noch einmal sehen? Hier ist es:
You also want to see the video from 2010 again? Here it is:

Advertisements

Hinweis: Sanja Matsuri (三社祭) in Asakusa (浅草)

19. May 2017

Tōkyōs großes Schreinfest steht vor der Tür!
Lassen Sie es sich nicht entgehen!

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Eine englische Version dieses Hinweises finden Sie hier.
An English version of this tip you can find here.

Vom heutigen Freitag bis Sonntag (21.5.2017) findet, wie jedes Jahr, das große „Sanja Festival“ (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) im Tōkyōter Stadtteil Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) statt. Auch in diesem Jahr werden wieder an die zwei Millionen Besucher erwartet, die das Schreinfest nicht nur zu einem der buntesten und lebendigsten in Tōkyō machen, sondern auch zu einem der größten.

Wer sich in diesen Tagen in Tōkyō aufhält und auf einen Besuch des Festes verzichtet, versagt sich damit ein einmaliges Erlebnis.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie hier:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears

Ort des Geschehens:

(Leider habe ich keinen Einfluss auf die teilweise falschen Beschriftungen in Google Maps)


Tip: Sanja Matsuri (三社祭) in Asakusa (浅草)

19. May 2017

Tōkyō’s great shrine festival is around the corner!
Don’t miss it!

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

A German version of this tip you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Hinweises finden Sie hier.

From today until Sunday (21 May 2017) – like every year in May – the great “Sanja Festival“ (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) is being held in Tōkyō’s Asakusa district (浅草 / あさくさ). Also this year about two million visitors are being expected, making the shrine festival not only to one of the most colourful and lively ones in Tōkyō, but also to one of the biggest.

Anyone who is in Tōkyō during these days and does not visit the festival, deprives him-/herself of an unique experience.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Further information you can find here:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears

Location of the event:

(Unfortunately, I have no influence on the partly incorrect caption in Google Maps)


Don’t miss it: Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)!

13. May 2016

The great shrine festival in Asakusa

Eine deutsche Version dieses Hinweises finden Sie hier.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

This coming weekend (May 14 and 15) the great shrine festival “Sanja Matsuri” (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) will take place in Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ), Tôkyô. If you are not put off by immense growds of people, don’t miss it by any means! For further details check the two links below.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears


Nicht verpassen: Sanja Matsui (三社祭)!

13. May 2016

Das große Schreinfest in Asakusa

An English version of this tip you can find here.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Am kommenden Wochenende (14. und 15. Mai 2016) findet in Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) in Tôkyô wieder das große Schrein- und Volksfest Sanja Matsuri (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) statt. Wenn Sie große Menschenmassen nicht abschrecken, sollten Sie das auf keinen Fall verpassen! Weitere Details entnehmen Sie bitten den unten verlinkten Artikeln.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears


Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) (Engl.)

25. October 2014

Deities’ palanquins and Sumō wrestlers

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

You probably know already what the Shintō deity Hachiman (八幡 / はちまん) is all about, if you have been carefully reading this blog – the small but pretty “Konnō Hachimangū” in Shibuya has given some insight into his history before. This time it is about the biggest and most important of all the Hachiman shrines in Tōkyō, the Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮 / とみおかはちまんぐう), which was founded in the year 1627 (at that time its grounds had just been reclaimed from the sea – in our days this area is virtually the centre of the city) and enjoyed particular support by the Tokugawa shōguns. Furthermore, Hachiman is also the protective deity of the Minamoto (源 / みなもと), former members of the imperial family that got demoted to the ranks of nobility. Support of the highest degree seemed to be ensured.

During the Meiji Restoration, however, the shrine lost the Tokugawa shōgun’s support, when he was disempowered – on the other hand it stayed in the favours of the Meiji Tennō who included the Tomioka Hachimangū in a list of the 10 most important shrines in Tōkyō. Nevertheless, the air raids of World War II., didn’t leave the shrine unharmed – it burned down completely in 1945 and was rebuilt after the war, this time as a concrete construction.

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Of course there are more important and much older shrines in Japan which have been dedicated to the shinō deity Hachiman – first of all the Usa Hachimangū (宇佐八幡宮 / うさはちまんぐう) in the Ōita prefecture (大分県 / おおいたけん) on Japans southwesternmost main island Kyūshū (九州 / きゅうしゅう), which is the “head office” (so to speak) of the Hachiman cult. But, as it happens, in Tōkyō it is the biggest of them all and at the same time the core of one of the biggest festivals in town. The “Fukagawa Hachiman Festival” that is being held annually around the 15th of August, is regarded as one of the “big shrine festivals of Edo” (together with the Sannō-Festival at the Hie shrine in Akasaka and the Kanda Myōjin Festival in Kanda; some sources also mention the Sanja Festival in Asakusa in this context).
Should you ever have felt that Tōkyō was crawling with people, you have probably never seen one of these shrine festivals (have a look at the postings related to the one in Asakusa, the Sanja Matsuri (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり), if you want to get an impression of that without leaving the comfort of your home).

The Tomioka Hachimangū,however, has some more superlatives to offer, as on the occasion of its festivals it also outshines all others with the biggest mikoshi (神輿 / みこし) of Japan. Such a “mikoshi” is a “deity’s palaquin” so to speak, in which a the shrine’s deity is being carried around in the neighbourhood during these festivals – and it is done with a ballyhoo and all the gaiety you can imagine.
The two main mikoshi if the Tomioka Hachimangū can be seen right at the beginning of the approach to the shine on the left hand side (west side of the approach), where they are being kept under look and key (but on display!) during the course of the year. In order to give you a glimpse of the dimensions and the glory, here some data:

First Mikoshi of the main shrine (御本社一の宮神輿)
Built in 1991
Height: 4.39 metres
more than 4.5 tons of weight
One doesn’t even want to speculate over the value of such a miskoshi, if one knows that the chest of the phoenix on top of the mikoshi is graced by a 7 ct diamond and that the eyes of the “bird” consist of 4 ct diamonts.

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) - (御本社一の宮神輿)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) – (御本社一の宮神輿)

Second Mikoshi  of the main shrine (御本社二の宮神輿)
Built in 1997
Height: 3.27 metres
more than 2 tons of weight
With its two diamonds of 2.2 ct forming the eyes of the phoenix this mikoshi is comparatively “simple”….

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) - (御本社二の宮神輿)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) – (御本社二の宮神輿)

It’s hard to guess how many carriers it takes to carry a mikoshi like that through the district.
And if you want to get a better understanding for the fabrication of such mikoshi, have a look at the following posting:

The Workshops of Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)
– Where beating the drum is part of the craft…

There is one more thing the Tomioka Hachimangū is famous for: The Sumō Wrestler Memorial (横綱力士碑 / よこづなりきしひ) located on its grounds.

This impressive memorial was erected in 1900 (in the 33rd year of the Meiji Tennō’s rule) by the 12th Yokozuna (横綱 / よこづな), Jinmaku Kyūgorō (陣幕 久五郎 / じんまく・きゅうごろう). These “Yokozuna” are wrestlers of the top division of sumō, champions of the saisonal tournament. And since then all champions have been “eternalised” here with their “battle name” (四股名 / しこな), engraved in granite. The latest entry on the when this posting was initally published was carved in stone on October 7th 2014 by the champion Kakuryū Rikisaburō (鶴竜 力三郎 / はくほう・しょう), a Mongolian wrestler, born in 1985, who’s real name is Mangaljalavyn Anand. When the photographs of this posting were reviewed in 2017, also the name of the most recent yokozuna, Kisenosato (稀勢の里) was added.
There is a very simple reason why Sumō wrestlers have their memorial at a shrine:
After the feudal system had been abolished during the Meiji Restoration (2nd half of the 19th century), also Sumō had lost one of its major sponsors. However, since Sumō has been closely connected to shrine festivals since the earliest days of Japan and had a ceremonial and religious function in Shintō, it suggested itself to form an even closer liaison with Shintō that had just been “upgraded” to the quasi state religion of Japan by the Meiji Tennō.

By the way: The word “sumō” (相撲 / すもう) is much more profane than one might have thought, if one translates it literally. “相” means (at least in this context) “each other” and “撲” stands for “to hit/to beat”. It’s as simple as that…

And since you are in this corner of the shrine’s grounds, why don’t you also have a look at the shrine garden of the Nana Watari Jinja (七渡神社 / ななわたりじんじゃ) that is unfortunately mostly ignored by visitors.

How to get there:

Take the Tōkyō Metro Tōzai line (東京メトロ東西線 / とうきょうメトロとうざいせん) to Monzen Nakachō (門前仲町 / もんぜんなかちょう), Exit 1 (3 minutes walk) or
the Toei Subway Ōedo line (都営大江戸線 / とえいおおえどせん) to Monzen Nakachō as well (門前仲町 / もんぜんなかちょう), Exit 5 (6 minutes walk)

Opening hours:

The shrine’s grounds are accessible daily around the clock.
No admission fee.

Please observe: There is also a shrine museum that can only be visited from 10 am to 3.30 pm. Admission fees apply depending on the age of the visitor and the exhibition’s area to be included.

Nearby:

Fukagawa Edo Museum (深川江戸資料館)
– A trip back in time to the old Edo

Fukagawa Fudōdō (深川不動堂)
– Where Ācala is protecting the wisdom of the Shingon School of Buddhism

Kiyosumi Teien (清澄庭園)
– The rather unknown one among the feudal gardens


Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) (dt.)

22. October 2014

Göttersänften und Sumō-Ringer

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Was es mit der Shintō-Gottheit Hachiman (八幡 / はちまん) auf sich hat, wissen aufmerksame Leser dieser Webseite ja bereits – der kleine, aber feine „Konnō Hachimangū“ in Shibuya war ja bereits Gegenstand einer Beschreibung. Hier geht es um den größten und wichtigsten aller Hachiman-Schreine in Tōkyō, den Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮 / とみおかはちまんぐう), der im Jahre 1627 gegründet wurde (seinerzeit auf dem Meer gerade erst abgerungenen Land – heute liegt er praktisch mitten in der Stadt) und sich des besonderen Wohlwollens der Tokugawa Shōgune erfreuen durfte. Außerdem ist Hachiman seit jeher die Schutzgottheit der Minamoto (源 / みなもと), ehemaliger Mitglieder des Kaiserhauses. Für Unterstützung von weltlich höchster Stelle war also gesorgt.

Nachdem der Schrein während der Meiji-Restauration um die Unterstützung durch die Tokugawa Shōgune gekommen war, wurde er folglich auch vom Meiji-Tennō nicht fallen gelassen, sondern zu einem der wichtigsten Schreine der Stadt erklärt. Die Bombardements Tōkyōs während des 2. Weltkrieges gingen aber auch am Tomioka Hachimangū nicht spurlos vorüber – er brannte der  1945 komplett nieder und wurde nach dem Kriege in Beton neu aufgebaut.

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮)

Natürlich gibt es in Japan wichtigere und ältere Schreine, die Hachiman gewidmet sind – allen voran der Usa Hachimangū (宇佐八幡宮 / うさはちまんぐう) in der Präfektur Ōita (大分県 / おおいたけん) auf Japans südwestlichster Hauptinsel Kyūshū (九州 / きゅうしゅう), der sozusagen das „Stammhaus“ dieses Hachiman-Kultes ist – aber in Tōkyō ist es eben der größte und gleichzeitig auch der Nukleus eines der größten Festivals in der Stadt. Das „Fukagawa Hachiman Festival“, das alljährlich um den 15. August stattfindet, zählt (zusammen mit dem Sannō-Festival am Hie-Jinja in Akasaka und dem Kanda Myōjin Festival in Kanda; einige Quellen zählen auch das Sanja Festival in Asakusa zu diesem bunten Reigen) zu den großen Schreinfestivals von Edo. Wer an normalen Tagen dem Irrglauben verfallen sollte, es wimmele in Tōkyō, hat noch keines dieser Schreinfestivals erlebt (schauen Sie beim Artikel über das Pendant von Asakusa, dem Sanja Matsuri (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) vorbei, wenn Sie sich aus sicherer Distanz ein Bild machen wollen).

Der Tomioka Hachimangū wartet allerdings noch mit einem weiteren Superlativ auf, denn auf seinen Festivals kommt auch das größte Mikoshi (神輿 / みこし) des Landes zum Einsatz. Bei diesen Mikoshi handelt es sich sozusagen um „Göttersänften“, in denen die Schutzgottheiten des jeweiligen Schreins mit großem Tamtam und in fröhlicher Ausgelassenheit durch das Stadtviertel getragen werden.
Die beiden Haupt-Mikoshi des Tomioka Hachimangū sind gleich am Anfang des Zugangs zum Schrein linker Hand (Westseite) zu sehen, wo sie während des Jahres unter Verschluss (aber sichtbar!) gehalten werden. Um sich die Dimensionen und die Pracht etwas besser vorstellen zu können, hier ein paar Daten:

Erstes Mikoshi des Hauptschreins (御本社一の宮神輿)
Herstellungsjahr: 1991
Höhe: 4,39 Meter
über 4,5 Tonnen schwer
Über den Preis eines solchen Mikoshi muss man noch nicht mal mehr spekulieren, wenn man weiß, dass allein die Brust des Phönix ein 7-karätiger Diamant ziert und die Augen aus 4-karätigen Diamanten bestehen.

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) - (御本社一の宮神輿)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) – (御本社一の宮神輿)

Zweites Mikoshi des Hauptschreins (御本社二の宮神輿)
Herstellungsjahr: 1997
Höhe: 3,27 Meter
über 2 Tonnen schwer
Mit den beiden 2,2-karätigen Diamanten, die die Augen des Phönix dieses Mikoshi darstellen, ist er vergleichsweise „bescheiden“ ausgestattet.

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) - (御本社二の宮神輿)

Tomioka Hachimangū (富岡八幡宮) – (御本社二の宮神輿)

Wie vieler Träger es bedarf, diese Mikoshi kreuz und quer durch das Viertel zu tragen, lässt sich kaum erahnen. Und wenn Sie sich ein Bild von der Herstellung solcher prächtiger Göttersänften machen wollen, schauen Sie doch mal in folgenden Artikel hinein:

Die Werkstätten von Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)
– Wo Trommeln zum Handwerk gehört/gehören…

Berühmtheit genießt der Tomioka Hachimangū allerdings auch für die auf seinem Gelände befindliche Gedenkstätte der Sumō-Ringer (横綱力士碑 / よこづなりきしひ).

Diese mächtige Gedenkstätte wurde im Jahre 1900 (im 33. Regierungsjahr des Meiji-Tennō) durch den 12. Yokozuna (横綱 / よこづな), Jinmaku Kyūgorō (陣幕 久五郎 / じんまく・きゅうごろう), errichtet. Mit „Yokozuna“ wird der Sumō-Ringer im Großmeisterrang, der Gewinner der jeweiligen Meisterschaft bezeichnet. Hier werden seither alle Champions mit deren „Kampfnamen“ (四股名 / しこな), eingemeißelt in Granitsteine, verewigt. Der letzte „Eintrag“ bei der Erstveröffentlichung dieses Artikels wurde am 7.10.2014 durch den Champion Kakuryū Rikisaburō (鶴竜 力三郎 / はくほう・しょう), einen 1985 geborenen, aus der Mongolei stammenden Sumō-Ringer, der eigentlich auf den Namen Mangaljalavyn Anand hört, vorgenommen. Im Jahre 2017 (dem Jahr der bildhaften Überarbeitung des Artikels) ist auch noch der zu dem Zeitpunkt aktuelle Yokozuna, Kisenosato (稀勢の里) hinzugefügt.
Dass die Sumō-Ringer ausgerechnet an einem Schrein ihre Gedenkstätte haben, ist leicht erklärt: Nach Beseitigung des Feudalsystems während der Meiji-Restauration (2. Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts) war auch dem Sumō der maßgebliche Sponsor abhanden gekommen. Aber da Sumō schon seit den Frühzeiten Japans eng mit den Schreinfesten verbunden war und von Anfang an eine zeremoniell-religiöse Bedeutung im Shintō hatte, lag es nahe, Sumō noch enger in den Shintō, der zur Zeit der Meiji-Restauration zur quasi-Staatsreligion erhoben wurde, einzubinden.

Übrigens: Das Wort „Sumō“ (相撲 / すもう) ist in seiner wortlichen Übersetzung wesentlich profaner, als man vielleicht annehmen würde. “相” bedeutet (hier) „gegenseitig/einander” und “撲” steht für „schlagen/prügeln“. So einfach ist das…

Und wenn sie schon in dieser Ecke des Schreingeländes sind, werfen Sie doch noch einen Blick dahinter, zum Schreingarten des Nana Watari Jinja (七渡神社 / ななわたりじんじゃ), der völlig zu Unrecht gern übersehen wird.

Wie man hinkommt:

Mit der Tōkyō Metro Tōzai-Linie (東京メトロ東西線 / とうきょうメトロとうざいせん) nach Monzen Nakachō (門前仲町 / もんぜんなかちょう), Ausgang 1 (Fußweg: 3 Minuten) oder
mit der Toei Subway Ōedo-Linie (都営大江戸線 / とえいおおえどせん) ebenfalls nach Monzen Nakachō (門前仲町 / もんぜんなかちょう), Ausgang 5 (Fußweg: 6 Minuten)

Öffnungszeiten:

Das Schreingelände kann täglich ohne zeitliche Beschränkung betreten werden.
Eintritt frei.

Bitte beachten Sie: Für das Schreinmuseum sind die Besuchszeiten auf 10 Uhr bis 15.30 Uhr beschränkt. Hierfür wird eine gestaffelte Eintrittsgebühr (je nach Alter und Zutrittsbefugnis) verlangt.

Ganz in der Nähe:

Fukagawa Edo Museum (深川江戸資料館)
– Auf Zeitreise zurück ins alte Edo

Fukagawa Fudōdō (深川不動堂)
– Wo Ācala die Lehre der Shingon-Sekte beschützt

Kiyosumi Teien (清澄庭園)
– Der eher unbekanntere unter den ehemaligen Feudalgärten