Sanja Matsuri 2017 – 三社祭 (Video)

21. May 2017

Am Rande des großen Festes: Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
On the outskirts of the great festival: A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears

Vorgestern habe ich ja schon auf das diesjährige Sanja-Matsuri (eines der ganz großen Sommerfestivals in Tōkyō) hingewiesen, das heute Abend seinen Abschluss gefunden hat. Und weil sich vor ein paar Jahren mein Video einer furiosen taiko (japanische Trommel)-Darbietung so großer Beliebtheit erfreut hat, gibt es heute eine Neuauflage davon – sieben Jahre später, aber kein bisschen lahmer. Genießen Sie es in vollen Zügen!

On the day before yesterday I posted a hint regarding this year’s Sanja-Matsuri (one of the big summer festivals in Tōkyō) that has come to an end tonight. And because my video of a rather frantic taiko (Japanese drum) performance attracted quite some people some years ago, it is time for an update. Seven years later – but as stunning as before. Enjoy it!

Wie man hinkommt:
Am einfachsten kommt man mit den U-Bahnlinien “Ginza-sen” (銀座線 / ぎんざせん) oder “Asakusa-sen” (浅草線 / あさくさせん) zur Station “Asakusa” (浅草 / あさくさ).

How to get there:
The easiest way is by subway lines “Ginza-sen” (銀座線 / ぎんざせん) or “Asakusa-sen” (浅草線 / あさくさせん) to Station “Asakusa”-station (浅草 / あさくさ).

Wenn Sie mehr über das Sanja Matsuri erfahren möchten, sehen Sie auch:
If you want to learn more about the Sanja Matsuri, please also have a look at:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr
A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Möchten Sie auch das Video von 2010 noch einmal sehen? Hier ist es:
You also want to see the video from 2010 again? Here it is:

Advertisements

Hinweis: Sanja Matsuri (三社祭) in Asakusa (浅草)

19. May 2017

Tōkyōs großes Schreinfest steht vor der Tür!
Lassen Sie es sich nicht entgehen!

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Eine englische Version dieses Hinweises finden Sie hier.
An English version of this tip you can find here.

Vom heutigen Freitag bis Sonntag (21.5.2017) findet, wie jedes Jahr, das große „Sanja Festival“ (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) im Tōkyōter Stadtteil Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) statt. Auch in diesem Jahr werden wieder an die zwei Millionen Besucher erwartet, die das Schreinfest nicht nur zu einem der buntesten und lebendigsten in Tōkyō machen, sondern auch zu einem der größten.

Wer sich in diesen Tagen in Tōkyō aufhält und auf einen Besuch des Festes verzichtet, versagt sich damit ein einmaliges Erlebnis.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie hier:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears

Ort des Geschehens:

(Leider habe ich keinen Einfluss auf die teilweise falschen Beschriftungen in Google Maps)


Tip: Sanja Matsuri (三社祭) in Asakusa (浅草)

19. May 2017

Tōkyō’s great shrine festival is around the corner!
Don’t miss it!

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

A German version of this tip you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Hinweises finden Sie hier.

From today until Sunday (21 May 2017) – like every year in May – the great “Sanja Festival“ (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) is being held in Tōkyō’s Asakusa district (浅草 / あさくさ). Also this year about two million visitors are being expected, making the shrine festival not only to one of the most colourful and lively ones in Tōkyō, but also to one of the biggest.

Anyone who is in Tōkyō during these days and does not visit the festival, deprives him-/herself of an unique experience.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Further information you can find here:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears

Location of the event:

(Unfortunately, I have no influence on the partly incorrect caption in Google Maps)


Don’t miss it: Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)!

13. May 2016

The great shrine festival in Asakusa

Eine deutsche Version dieses Hinweises finden Sie hier.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

This coming weekend (May 14 and 15) the great shrine festival “Sanja Matsuri” (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) will take place in Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ), Tôkyô. If you are not put off by immense growds of people, don’t miss it by any means! For further details check the two links below.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears


Nicht verpassen: Sanja Matsui (三社祭)!

13. May 2016

Das große Schreinfest in Asakusa

An English version of this tip you can find here.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)

Am kommenden Wochenende (14. und 15. Mai 2016) findet in Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) in Tôkyô wieder das große Schrein- und Volksfest Sanja Matsuri (三社祭 / さんじゃまつり) statt. Wenn Sie große Menschenmassen nicht abschrecken, sollten Sie das auf keinen Fall verpassen! Weitere Details entnehmen Sie bitten den unten verlinkten Artikeln.

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)
– Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)Video

Sanja Matsuri 2017 (三社祭) (Video)
– Am Rande des großen Festes:
Ein Augen- und Ohrenschmaus mit Taiko (太鼓)
– On the outskirts of the great festival:
A feast of taiko (太鼓) for the eyes and the ears


The Workshops of Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)

26. February 2014

Where beating the drum is part of the craft…*

* If this crude translation from German may be allowed….

A German version of this posting you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.

Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)

Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)

The high standards of Japanese arts and crafts are world-renowned. And this is certainly not a coincidence, as Japanese master craftmen seem to cultivate a special dedication to their art and they also seem to form a sort of most impressive symbiosis with the materials they are about to work on.

I was able to find quite a representative for that at the workshops of the time-honored establishment of Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本・卯之助 / みやもと・うのすけ), which I had the chance to visit with members of the “Deutsche Gesellschaft für Natur- und Völkerkunde Ostasiens” (OAGドイツ東洋文化研究協会 ).
The workshops of Miyamoto Unosuke produce, among other things, the famous great hand-made “taiko”(太鼓 / たいこ)-drums, but gorgeous and delicately adorned, portable shrines – so-called “mikoshi” (神輿 / みこし) – just as well. And they do that since 1861, when the company was founded (at that time under the name of “Yamashiroya”, but residing in Asakusa and “listening” to the Name “Miyamoto since 1893). Today about 50 craftsmen are working for the firm. And during the course of their employment with Miyamoto Unosuke they have to make themselves familiar with the whole product range of the company (while the lacquerers may have a certain exceptional position, as the paint used may lead to allergic reactions with some of the members of staff).

Suitable to the “devotion to the work” displayed by the craftsmen, the company has given itself a motto: “重義” (しげよし / shigeyoshi), which could, most roughly be translated with “one should value trust and sincerity prior to profit”. Nevertheless, when visiting the premisis of the company, one doesn’t get the impression that profit was all together neglected. And why should it be? After all, a trade in hand finds gold in every land. Why not in Japan?!

During the funeral ceremonies of the Taishō emperor (1926) Miyamoto Unosuke was commissioned with the ceremonial drums – and it has been granted an imperial warrant ever since. Hence, also musical instruments needed for the enthrownment of the Shōwa emperor came from Miyamoto Unosuke. Since then the company became official supplier for the Kabuki-za (1963), the National Theatre (1966) and the National Noh-Theatre (1986). Also there is hardly any work of restauration at the notable temples and shrines in the city that didn’t require the company’s skilled experts.

Trommelstöcke (撥)

drum sticks (撥)

Of all their products, the best-known may be the “nagadō daiko” (長胴太鼓 / ながどうたいこ / long-body drums – as their body is longer than the diameter of the drum’s head). These drums come in all sizes, but the most impressive ones are those with diameters of more than one metre – made from wood of the domestic keyaki tree (Japanese zelkova). The body of the drum is made from one single piece of the wood that needs to be dried in an elaborate fashion for three to five years, once the rough version of the drum’s body is hollowed out. Only after the drying process it can be assessed, whether the wood has been brought into a condition that is required for further procession. The rough body of the drum finds its perfect shape and smooth surface under the hands and ploughs (no abrasive paper!) of the craftsmen of the firm, before it the drumhead made of cowhide is tacked to it.

As the age of a tree (or its circumference respectively) also dictates the maximal size of a drum to be made from it, the large drums are the biggest treasures. It is said that the age of a tree should correlate with the expected useful life of the drum made from it. Hence, if a 400 year old tree is cut today to make drums from it, the biggest one of them should still be in use by the middle of this millenium (provided appropriate handling and care).

Here are two examples for one of those particilarly big “nagadō daiko”:

And if you want to see (and hear) the soundscapes that can be created when various smaller “taiko” are put together, have a look at this slighly older video I took at the cherryblossom festival at the Sumida river:

Those who have been to a kabuki- or noh performance may know the “kotsuzumi” (小鼓 / こつづみ) and their – at first glance – idendical sister, the “ōtsuzumi” (大鼓 / おおつづみ) (by the way, “tsuzumi” is a general term for percussion). Their slender body is usually made of the wood of cherry trees and it is decorated with precious lacquer-ware, before their horsehide drumhead is fixed. One of the characteristics of these drums, however, are the bright red hemp ropes that are used for tightening the drumhead. These ropes add an additional degree of “flexibility” to the drums, as their tuning can be changed by applying pressure to the rope.

Naturally, the musical instruments that are used for “gagaku” (雅楽 / ががく) have their very unique rank among traditional Japanese instruments. This kind of music, that has been played at the Imperial Court since the Heian period (8th century AD), originally came from the Chinese Impire of those days, and it still sounds like the passage of events wasn’t able to change it the slightest. For a western ear this music may seem to lack harmony, because the instruments that carry the melody can do that in line with the underlying rhythm as well as independently. In any case, for many people this music is the very essence of age-old Japanese culture. Another identifying feature of this music is its most solemn, extremly slow speed. Among the instruments used for “gagaku”, the gorgeous percussion instruments, “dadaiko” (鼉太鼓 / だだいこ), “shōko” (鉦鼓 / しょうこ) and “gaku daiko” (楽太鼓 / がくだいこ) are surely the most impressive.

Even though you are not supposed to beat them, another of the main products of the workshops may very well be the most awsome: The so-called “mikoshi” (神輿 / みこし), the portable shrines for shintō-dieties. None of the big shrine festivals in the city would be possible without them. I’ve reported about them before:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭) (Engl./dt.)
– Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr
– A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)Video

With this “parade of the dieties” local people are aiming at ridding the respective part of town of evil spirits. And all those who have a more “worldly” approach to it, take it as a welcome occasion for a little bit of exuberance. The shrine festivals in Tōkyō are surely among the most lively events one can imagine when it comes to folk festivals. The Sanja Matsuri alone attracts millions of people on one single weekend.

In the year 1988 Miyamoto Unosuke also founded the first museum of the world, dedicated to drums. In the meantime the collections contain some 900 exhibits from all corners of the world. But it doesn’t just “exhibit” them – most of the items on display may not only be tried, the owner of the museum practically “demands” the visitors to play with the instruments. Who ever wanted to play a Jamaican steel drum (steel pan) is in the right place. Or would you like to find out how the croaking of frogs is being imitaded on kabuki stages, how the falling snow is being made audible there, the Miyamoto Drum Museum is the place for it.

By the way: At the “Miyamoto Studio” you can take lessons for all the instruments produced in the workshops.

Address of the Head-Office and the Workshops of Miyamoto Unosuke:

6-1-15 Asakusa
Taitō-ku
Tōkyō 111-0032

株式会社 宮本卯之助商店
〒111-0032 東京都台東区浅草6-1-15

Map of the main shop and the workshops of Miyamoto Unosuke:

Drum Museum:

Openin hours:
10 am to 5 pm
Closed on Mondays (should Monday be a holiday, the museum stays closed on Tuesday)

Admission fee:
Adults: 500 Yen
Children (from elementary school): 150 Yen
Disabled and accompanying person: free

Address of the Drum Museum:
2-1-1 Nishi-Asakusa, 4. OG
Taitō-ku
Tōkyō 111-0035

太鼓館
〒111-0035東京都台東区西浅草2-1-1

Map of the Drum Museum of Miyamoto Unosuke:

How to get there:

Drum- and Mikoshi Workshop:
Take the Tōkyō Metro Ginza line (東京メトロ銀座線 / とうきょうメトロぎんざせん) or the Toei Subway Asakusa line (都営地下鉄浅草線 / とえいちかてつあさくさせん) or the Tōbu-Skytree line (東武スカイツリー線 / とうぶスカイツリーせん) to Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) and from there about 5 min on foot along the Umamichi Dōri (馬道通り / うまみちどおり) in northern direction to Asakusa 6 chōme (浅草6丁目 / あさくさ6ちょうめ).

Drum Museum:
Take the Tōkyō Metro Ginza line (東京メトロ銀座線 / とうきょうメトロぎんざせん) to Tawaramachi (田原町/ たわらまち) and from there 2 minutes on foot in northern direction along the Kokusai Dōri (国際通り / こくさいどおり).

Trommel-/Drum-Museum (太鼓館)

Trommel-/Drum-Museum (太鼓館)


Die Werkstätten von Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)

25. February 2014

Wo Trommeln zum Handwerk gehört/gehören…

Eine englischsprachige Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)

Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本卯之助)

Der hohe Standard japanischen Handwerks und Kunsthandwerks ist weltberühmt. Und er kommt nicht von ungefähr, denn japanische Handwerksmeister scheinen eine besondere Hingabe an ihre Kunstfertigkeit zu pflegen und erwecken dann auch gern den Anschein, eine besonders eindrucksvolle Symbiose mit dem zu bearbeitenden Material einzugehen.

Ein wirklich mustergültig zu nennendes Beispiel hierfür konnte ich in den Werkstätten des Traditionshauses Miyamoto Unosuke (宮本・卯之助 / みやもと・うのすけ) in Augenschein nehmen, deren Besuch die „Deutsche Gesellschaft für Natur- und Völkerkunde Ostasiens“ ermöglicht hatte. In den Werkstätten von Miyamoto Unosuke werden u.a. die berühmten großen „taiko“(太鼓 / たいこ)-Trommeln in Handarbeit hergestellt, aber auch überaus prächtige und filigran verzierte tragbare Schreine, so genannte „mikoshi“ (神輿 / みこし). Und das schon seit 1861, dem Gründungsjahr der Firma (damals noch unter dem Namen „ Yamashiroya“, seit 1893 in Asakusa ansässig und auf den Namen Miyamoto „hörend“). Heute beschäftigt sie 50 Handwerker, die im Laufe ihrer beruflichen Karriere bei Miyamoto Unosuke die komplette Produktpalette des Unternehmens kennenlernen (wobei die Lackierer eine gewisse Sonderstellung einnehmen, da die verwendeten Lacke wohl „gern mal“ Unverträglichkeiten auslösen und nicht jeder Mitarbeiter hierfür in Frage kommt).

Passend zu der „Hingabe an das Werk“ hat sich das Unternehmen auch das Firmen-Motto „重義” (しげよし / shigeyoshi) gegeben, das sich ganz frei mit „schätze Vertrauen und Aufrichtigkeit höher als den Profit“ übersetzen lässt. Allerdings hat man deswegen beim Besuch der Räumlichkeiten der Firma nicht gleich den Eindruck, als habe man das Profitstreben darüber gänzlich in den Hintergrund gerückt. Warum sollte ausgerechnet hier Handwerk keinen goldenen Boden haben?

Anlässlich der Beisetzung des Taishō-Kaisers (1926) durften die Werkstätten die zeremoniellen Trommeln liefern und zählen seither zu den Lieferanten des Kaiserhauses – weswegen sie 1928 auch die Musikinstrumente für die Thronbesteigung des Shōwa-Kaisers zur Verfügung stellen durften. In der Folgezeit wurde Miyamoto Unosuke offizieller Lieferant des Kabuki-za (1963), des Nationaltheaters (1966) und des Nationalen Noh-Theaters (1986). Und kaum eine der Renovierungsarbeiten an den namhaften Tempeln und Schreinen der Stadt ging ohne ein Zutun der Firma vonstatten.

Trommelstöcke (撥)

Trommelstöcke (撥)

Am bekanntesten dürften wohl die „nagadō daiko“ (長胴太鼓 / ながどうたいこ / Langkörper-Trommeln – weil ihr Körper länger als ihr Durchmesser weit ist) sein, die teilweise mächtigen Trommeln aus dem Holz des einheimischen Keyaki-Baums (japanische Zelkove; ein mit der Ulme verwandter Baum). Der aus einem Stück des Stammes eines Keyaki-Baumes gewonnene Körper der Trommel muss, bevor er abschießend bearbeitet werden kann, drei bis fünf Jahre in einem aufwändigen Verfahren trocknen. Erst danach lässt sich beurteilen, ob der Trockenvorgang das Holz in den Zustand gebracht hat, der für die Weiterbearbeitung erforderlich ist. Seine perfekte Form findet der Trommelkörper unter den Händen und Hobeln (kein Schmirgelpapier!) der Mitarbeiter des Unternehmens, bevor sie mit Kuhhäuten bespannt werden.

Da das Alter des Baumes (sprich: sein Umfang) auch die maximale Größe der aus ihm zu gewinnenden Trommel vorgibt, sind große Trommeln natürlich besondere Schätze. Hierbei gilt die Maxime: Das Alter des Baumes sollte in etwa der Nutzungsdauer einer aus ihm gewonnenen Trommel entsprechen. Sprich: Wenn heute ein 400 Jahre alter Baum für Trommeln gefällt wird, sollten diese auch noch bis in die Mitte unseres Jahrtausends benutzbar sein (sachgemäße Behandlung und regelmäßige Pflege natürlich vorausgesetzt).

Hier zwei Beispiele für eine besonders mächtige dieser „nagadō daiko“:

Und wenn Sie sehen möchten, welche Klangwelten viele Taiko im Verein zustande bringen können, schauen Sie doch mal dieses etwas ältere Video an, das ich beim Kirschblütenfest am Sumida-Fluss gedreht habe:

Besucher von Kabuki- oder Noh-Vorstellungen werden sicher auch die einander ähnelnden “kotsuzumi” (小鼓 / こつづみ) und “ōtsuzumi” (大鼓 / おおつづみ) kennen („tsuzumi“ ist übrigens ein allgemeiner Begriff für Schlagzeug jedweder Art), deren schlanker Tubus in aller Regel aus Kirschholz hergestellt und mit prächtigen Lackarbeiten verziert wird, bevor er mit Pferdehaut bespannt wird. Charakteristisch sind allerdings die Verspannungen der Trommelfelle mit roten Hanfseilen, die zu der vielseitigen, man möchte fast sagen „vielstimmigen“ Einsetzbarkeit dieser Trommeln beiträgt. Über Druck, den der Spieler auf die Hanfseile ausübt, kann er die Trommel in ihrer „Stimmung“ beeinflussen.

Einen besonderen Rang nehmen natürlich die Instrumente ein, die für „gagaku“ (雅楽 / ががく) zum Einsatz kommen. Diese Musik, die seit der Heian-Zeit (8. Jahrhundert n.Chr.) bei Hofe gespielt wird und ursprünglich aus dem Chinesischen Kaiserreich kam, klingt auch heute noch so, als habe ihr die Zeit nichts anhaben können – was in westlichen Ohren vordergründig nur wenig harmonisch klingt, weil die Instrumente, die die Melodie des Musikstücks tragen, sich sowohl am Rhythmus des Stückes ausrichten, als auch asynchron zu demselben agieren können, gilt heute vielen als der Inbegriff alter, japanischer Kultur. Kennzeichnend für diese Musik ist ihr wirklich extrem getragen langsames Tempo. Unter den Instrumenten, die bei gagaku zum Einsatz kommen, sind die großen Schlaginstrumente „dadaiko“ (鼉太鼓 / だだいこ), „shōko“ (鉦鼓 / しょうこ) und „gaku daiko“ (楽太鼓 / がくだいこ) die sicherlich prächtigsten.

Auch wenn man darauf nicht herumschlagen sollte, ist ein anderes Hauptprodukt der Werkstätten vielleicht doch am eindrucksvollsten: Die so genannten oder auch „mikoshi“ (神輿 / みこし), die tragbaren Schreine für Shintō-Gottheiten, ohne die die großen Schreinfestivals der Stadt gar nicht denkbar wären. Ich habe darüber ja bereits berichtet:

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭) (Engl./dt.)
– Ein Fest für die Götter, das Volk, die Augen und das Ohr
– A festival for the gods, the people, the eyes and the ear

Sanja Matsuri (三社祭)Video

Mit dem „Zug der Götter“ durch die jeweiligen Stadtteile will man bewirken, dass böse Geister vertrieben werden. Aber wer dem ganzen eine mehr weltliche Komponente abgewinnen möchte, sieht daran einen willkommenen Anlass zur Ausgelassenheit. Die Schreinfestivals Tōkyōs gehören sicher zum Lebendigsten, was man sich an Volksfesten vorstellen kann. Allein das oben beschriebene Sanja Matsuri lockt mehrere Millionen Besucher an einem einzigen Wochenende an.

Im Jahre 1988 hat die Firma Miyamoto Unosuke das erste Museum der Welt eingerichtet, das sich dezidiert den Trommeln widmet. Hier gibt es inzwischen eine Sammlung von etwa 900 Exponaten aus allen Winkeln der Welt zu sehen. Ach, was heißt „zu sehen“? Hier darf die überwiegende Mehrzahl der Ausstellungsstücke nicht nur ausprobiert werden – der Eigentümer besteht förmlich darauf, dass man dies tut. Wer also schon immer mal einer jamaikanischen Steel Drum (Steel Pan) Töne entlocken wollte oder einfach nur ausprobieren möchte, wie man in Kabuki-Theatern das Quaken von Fröschen nachahmt oder das Fallen von Schnee akustisch „darstellt“, ist hier genau richtig aufgehoben.

Im Miyamoto Studio werden übrigens auch Kurse zum Erlernen der in den Werkstätten hergestellten Musikinstrumente angeboten.

Anschrift des Hauptgeschäftes und der Werkstätten von Miyamoto Unosuke:

6-1-15 Asakusa
Taitō-ku
Tōkyō 111-0032

株式会社 宮本卯之助商店
〒111-0032 東京都台東区浅草6-1-15

Lageplan des Ladenlokals und der Werkstätten von Miyamoto Unosuke:

Trommelmuseum:

Öffnungszeiten:
10 Uhr bis 17 Uhr
Geschlossen montags (fällt ein Feiertag auf Montag, am Dienstag geschlossen)

Eintrittsgebühr:
Erwachsene: 500 Yen
Kinder (ab Grundschulalter): 150 Yen
Behinderte und Begleitperson: Eintritt frei

Anschrift des Tommelmuseums:
2-1-1 Nishi-Asakusa, 4. OG
Taitō-ku
Tōkyō 111-0035

太鼓館
〒111-0035東京都台東区西浅草2-1-1

Lageplan des Trommel-Museums von Miyamoto Unosuke:

Wie man hinkommt:

Zur Trommel- und Mikoshi-Werkstatt:
Mit den U-Bahnen der Tōkyō Metro Ginza-Linie (東京メトロ銀座線 / とうきょうメトロぎんざせん) oder der Toei Subway Asakusa-Linie (都営地下鉄浅草線 / とえいちかてつあさくさせん) oder der Tōbu-Skytree-Linie (東武スカイツリー線 / とうぶスカイツリーせん) nach Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) und von dort ca. 5 Minuten entlang der Umamichi Dōri (馬道通り / うまみちどおり) in nördlicher Richtung nach Asakusa 6 chōme (浅草6丁目 / あさくさ6ちょうめ).

Zum Trommel-Museum:
Mit der U-Bahn der Tōkyō Metro Ginza-Linie (東京メトロ銀座線 / とうきょうメトロぎんざせん) nach Tawaramachi (田原町/ たわらまち) und von dort zwei Minuten zu Fuß in nördlicher Richtung entlang der Kokusai Dōri (国際通り / こくさいどおり).

Trommel-Museum (太鼓館)

Trommel-Museum (太鼓館)