Tottori (鳥取): Wakasa (若桜) (Engl.)

21. February 2017

A gem, hidden in the mountains

Wakasa, Kura Dōri (若桜・蔵通り)

Wakasa, Kura Dōri (若桜・蔵通り)

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

At the end of non-electrified the railroad “Wakasa line” (若桜鉄道 / わかさてつどう), that is still regularly serviced by an old steam locomotive, you’ll find the town center of Wakasa (若桜 / わかさ), a village that, with quite a number of hamlets, streches out into the nearby valleys. It is surrounded by densely wooded mountains with peaks between 1,200 and 1,500 metres and is located about 30 km southeast of the prefecture’s capital, Tottori (鳥取市 / 鳥取市).

The little town never really gained historic significance, but in the old days its abundance of wood brought some splendor to it. From the Kamakura era (1185-1333) it is known, that Wakasa’s wood was brought down to the sea shore via the mountain rivers and shipped to Kamakura from there. During the Edo period (1603-1868) the cultivation of rice was intensified to meet the growing population’s demand. The plentifulness of the mountains’ waters offered the perfect foundation for it. But they also were the cause for terrible floodings (especially in 1815 and 1888).

Today Wakasa is mainly known for its steam locomotive, but also for its particularly delicious radish.

The tracks of the “Wakasa line” are just 19.2 km long. But since 1 Dec. 1930 they connect the town with the station of Kōge (郡家駅 / こうげえき) in Yazu (八頭町 / やずちょう) and from there it’s just a short ride to the prefectural capital. Until 1974 also freight was transported on this line, but in our days, it is just used for passenger trains. I’m writing so much about this railway, because Wakasa is particularly proud of its old steam engine type JNR class C12, of which between 1932 and 1947 as many as 282 were built. The specimen you can see here was built in the year Shōwa 13 (i.e. 1938) and is fully functional. Compared with that, the diesel locomotive from the 70s of last century, which you can also see here (type JNR class DD16), looks almost modern. People here are also very proud of their old railway turntable from 1930 that is still in operation today.

Location of Wakasa station:

However, even if you think that visiting Japan just for the sake of historic railways is not worth the trip (the more contemporary trains of Japan may in fact be much more impressive), you haven’t come to the wrong place at Wakasa. This little town is among the most charming ones, and – praise the lord – not one of those terribly obstructed ones.

There are two streets in walking distance from the station I would like to draw your attention to:

The Kura Dōri (蔵通り / くらどおり).

This rather romantic street is nestled between a long row of old warehouses (蔵 / くら) and the temple district of Shimomachi (下町 / しもまち) and its particularly quaint Buddhist temples Shōei-ji (正栄寺 / しょうえいじ) and Saihō-ji (西方寺 / さいほうじ), that look much older than the other buildings of Wakasa.

Wakasa, Saihō-ji (若桜・西方寺)

Wakasa, Saihō-ji (若桜・西方寺)

This part of town is the “result” of a devasting fire that happened in 1885 and destroyed major parts of it. Considering the consequence of the previous style of buildings and housing the construction of fire-proof “kura” was forced (not unlike what happened in Kawagoe around the same time). Also for the larger buildings of temples it became a regulation to leave more distance between the buildings and to the next street.

And something that might also find your interest: The whole Kura Dōri has been equipped with water nozzles in its pavement. These nozzles spray hot spring water onto the pavement, to keep it free from snow and ice in winter.

Parallel to the Kura Dōri runs

the Kariya Dōri (カリヤ通り / かりやどおり).

This is the main street of Wakasa so to speak. It gains its charm from its well preserved old town houses, quite a number of long established businesses and – among other things – a sake brewery. The cosiness of this street also is a result of the strict building code that was enforced after the big fire from 1885. One of the most breathtaking features are the streams of water flowing on either side of the street. In front of some house these water channels have been widened to form basins, some houses even used the streams to supply fresh water to basins in their entrances. And that is where the families keep gorgeous carps (they are, perhaps, so gorgeous, because they are generously stuffed with kitchen waste…).

Three of the buildings at the Kariya Dōri are worth a closer look:

First, let’s take a look at the tiny “Shōwa Toy Museum” (昭和おもちゃ館 / しょうわおもちゃかん):

It may not be a museum of international reputation, but if you are looking for toys, household tools and electric appliances of the Shōwa era (1926-1989) or if rummage around for old fashioned sweets is your thing, this is the place you might want to consider.

Open daily (except Tuesday) from 10 am to 5 pm.
Admisstion fee: adults: 200 Yen / children up to 12 years of age: 100 Yen.

Location of the Shōwa Toy Museums:

Are you interested in Japanese sake? Then pay a visit to the “Ōta Sake Brewery” (太田酒造場 / おおたしゅぞうじょう). This sake brewery that was founded in 1909 takes advantage of the high quality spring waters of Wakasa and still abides by the principle of “quality, not quantity” – annual production is limited to 10,000 standard bottles (1.8 liters = 一升瓶 / いっしょうびん).

The brand name of the brewery is known beyond the borders of the prefecture: “Benten Musume” (辨天娘 / べんてんむすめ).
And yet, in 1992 it looked like the final nail was put in the brewery’s coffin, when it became impossible to recruit enough sake brewers to continue production – due to the dramatic decrease in rural population. Only in 2002 production could be resumed, starting with a meagre 1,080 litres of sake.
Since 2010 the brewery is so proud of the fact that it uses local ingredients only, that it puts the name of every contributing rice farmer on its bottles.
Usually, I don’t engage in clumsy promotion of products on this website, but the brewer’s family was of such a hospitable nature, that I feel compelled to make an exception from the rule.

Location of the Ōta Sake-Brauerei:

Doesn’t sightseeing make you hungy? Well, then it’s time for a little something. Why not trying the “Dining Café Arata” (ダイニングカフェー新 / あらた) – assuming you love pork, because that’s the specialty of the place. The restaurant is splendidly accomodated by a particularly gorgeous but traditional town house.

Location of the restaurant “Arata”:

Diving into times even longer passed is an old Buddhist temple that also belongs to the community of Wakasa: The Fudōin Iwayadō (不動院岩屋堂 / ふどういんいわやどう), that dates back to the year 806 when it was founded as part of a larger temple compound (there are also sources mentioning that it was built in the Muromach period (1333-1392)). It is also reported that this temple was the only part that survived during severe destruction in 1581 (Hideyoshi Toyotomi’s invasion of Inaba). In the 50s of last century extensive restoration work was undertaken, and finally the temple was registered as an important cultural asset of the country. Furthermore, it is amoung the 100 most popular buildings of the prefecture. And there is a good an obvious reason for it: Its location! It was fitted into a cave 13 metres above the ground. Isn’t that extraordinary?!

But also have a look at the details: The Fudōin Iwayadō is also home to a small wooden statue that was carved centuries ago. Legend has it that it was Kōbō-Daishi (the founder of Shingon Buddhism) himself who carved it (hence, it must be more than 1,200 years old). It is said, that this little statue was miraculously spared when the temple was devastated, because it represent the God of Fire. Twice a year (on March 28 and July 28) holy fires (goma / 護摩 / ごま) are being held here, when the statue is displayed in public.

Right next to the Fudōin Iwayadō you’ll pass the also rather romanticly placed Iwaya Jinja (岩屋神社 / いわやじんじゃ) in front of a steep and rocky wall and surrounded by old trees. Just have a look at that mossy approach to the main building of the shrine.

Location of the Fudōin Iwayadō:

Don’t you agree: When in Tottori, there are quite a number of reasons for some side trips – especially, when it comes to this easy-to-reach village in the mountains. I’m sure you’ll fall for its charm and the hospitality of its inhabitants.

And if this has triggered some interest in Tottori in you, why don’t you have a look here:

Kurayoshi (倉吉)
– The town of white walls and red roofs

Kotoura-chō (琴浦町)
– Stucco plasterers of the world – watch out!

Tottori Sand Museum (砂の美術館)
-Travel Around the World in Sand

Tottori Folk Crafts Museum (鳥取民芸美術館)
– Have a look and be amazed – thanks to Shōya Yoshida


Tottori (鳥取): Wakasa (若桜) (dt.)

19. February 2017

Schmuckstück, versteckt in den Bergen

Wakasa, Kura Dōri (若桜・蔵通り)

Wakasa, Kura Dōri (若桜・蔵通り)

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Am Ende einer nicht elektrifizierten Bahnlinie, der „Wakasa Bahn“ (若桜鉄道 / わかさてつどう), die regelmäßig auch noch von einer alten Dampflok bedient wird, befindet sich der Ortskern von Wakasa (若桜 / わかさ), einer Gemeinde, die sich, verteilt auf einzelne Ortsflecken, in mehrere Täler erstreckt. Umgeben von Bergen mit einer Höhe zwischen 1200 und 1500 Metern und gut 30 km südöstlich von der Stadt Tottori entfernt.

Geschichtliche Bedeutung hat das Städtchen nie erlangt, es aber in alten Tagen mit seinem Holzreichtum zu einer gewissen Stattlichkeit gebracht. Aus der Kamakura-Zeit (1185-1333) ist bekannt, dass Holz und Reis den Fluss hinab ans Meer gebracht und von dort verschifft wurde. Während der Edo-Zeit (1603-1868) wurde der Reisanbau intensiviert – der Wasserreichtum der Gebirgslandschaft bildete die ideale Grundlage dafür, sorgte aber auch für teilweise verheerende Überschwemmungen (namentlich in den Jahren 1815 und 1888). Heute ist Wakasa in erster Linie für seine Dampflok, aber auch für seinen besonders leckeren Rettich berühmt.

Die 19,2 km lange Strecke der „Wakasa Bahn“ verbindet seit dem 1. Dezember 1930 Wakasa mit dem Bahnhof Kōge (郡家駅 / こうげえき) in Yazu (八頭町 / やずちょう) und von dort mit der Hauptstadt der Präfektur. Bis 1974 wurden auch Güter auf dieser Strecke transportiert, heute verkehren nur noch Personenzüge. Ich gehe etwas genauer auf diese Bahnstrecke ein, weil die Gemeinde besonders stolz auf ihre alte Dampflok der Baureihe JNR Class C12 ist, von denen zwischen 1932 und 1947 ganze 282 Stück gebaut wurden. Das hiesige Exemplar stammt aus dem Jahr Shōwa 13 (lies und sprich: 1938) und ist voll funktionstüchtig. Dagegen wirkt die aus den 70er Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts stammende, ebenfalls eher museale Diesellok aus der Baureihe JNR Class DD16 fast schon modern. Besonders stolz ist mal auch auf eine Drehscheibe aus den Anfangsjahren der Eisenbahn und das historische Bahnhofsgebäude, das noch aus dem Jahre 1930 erhalten ist und bis heute genutzt wird.

Lageplan des Bahnhofs von Wakasa:

Wer aber der Meinung sein sollte, man müsse historischer Eisenbahnen wegen nicht unbedingt nach Japan reisen (die modernen Eisenbahnbetriebe sind hier ja auch wesentlich eindrucksvoller), ist in Wakasa dennoch nicht fehl am Platze. Der Ort gehört nämlich auch zu den eher beschaulichen und – Göttin sei Dank – nicht verbauten. Zwei Straßen im Zentrum (und in Bahnhofsnähe) möchte ich hervorheben:

Die Kura Dōri (蔵通り / くらどおり).

Sie verläuft direkt zwischen einer langen Reihe alter Lagerhäuser (蔵 / くら) und dem Tempelviertel von Shimomachi (下町 / しもまち) mit den besonders altertümlich wirkenden buddhistischen Tempeln Shōei-ji (正栄寺 / しょうえいじ) und Saihō-ji (西方寺 / さいほうじ), die wesentlich älter wirken, als die restliche Bebauung Wakasas.

Wakasa, Saihō-ji (若桜・西方寺)

Wakasa, Saihō-ji (若桜・西方寺)

Dieses Viertel haben wir heute sozusagen einem Großbrand im Jahre 1885 zu „verdanken“, dem Großteile der Stadt zum Opfer gefallen waren. Danach wurde der Bau von Gebäude im feuerfesten „Kura“-Stil forciert (ähnlich, wie das ja auch in Kawagoe geschehen ist). Auch für die Tempelgebäude war großzügiger Abstand von einander und der nächsten Straße vorgeschrieben.

Auffallend auch: Die Kura Dōri ist durchgängig mit Wasserdüsen im Pflaster versehen, über die im Winter heißes Quellwasser versprüht wird, das die Straße schnee- und eisfrei hält.

Parallel zur Kura Dōri verläuft

Die Kariya Dōri (カリヤ通り / かりやどおり).

Und die ist sozusagen die Hauptstraße der kleinen Stadt mit gut erhaltenen, alten Stadthäusern, einer Vielzahl alt eingesessener Geschäfte und u.a. auch einer Sakebrauerei. Auch die Bebauung dieser Straße geht auf die strikten Bauregeln zurück, die nach dem verheerenden Großbrand von 1885 erlassen worden waren. Eines der atemberaubendsten „features“, das in dem Zusammenhang entstanden ist, sind allerdings die Wasserläufe rechts und links der Fahrbahn, die vor einigen Häuser zu Becken verbreitert wurden, ja deren Wasser teilweise sogar in die Eingangsbereiche der Häuser geleitet wird, wo man u.a. prächtige Karpfen hält (die sich besonders über Essensreste vom in den Becken gespülten Geschirr freuen).

Drei der Gebäude in der Kariya Dōri möchte ich hervorheben:

Da ist zunächst das kleine „Shōwa Spielzeug-Museum“ (昭和おもちゃ館 / しょうわおもちゃかん):

Kein Museum von Weltruf, aber wenn Sie sich für Spielsachen, Haushaltsgeräte und Elektronik der Shōwa-Zeit (1926-1989) interessieren und in einem altmodischen Süßigkeitenladen kramen wollen, sind Sie hier richtig.

Geöffnet täglich außer dienstags von 10 Uhr bis 17 Uhr.
Eintritt: Erwachsene: 200 Yen / Kinder bis einschließlich 12 Jahre: 100 Yen.

Lageplan des Shōwa Spielzeug-Museums:

Sie interessieren sich für Sake? Dann statten Sie der „Ōta Sake-Brauerei“ (太田酒造場 / おおたしゅぞうじょう) einen Besuch ab. Diese im Jahr 1909 gegründete Brauerei profitiert von der besonders hohen Qualität des Brauwassers und arbeitet auch heute noch nach der Maxime „Klasse statt Masse“ – die Produktion beschränkt sich auf eine Menge, die gerade mal für 10.000 Standardflaschen (1,8 Liter = 一升瓶 / いっしょうびん) ausreicht.

Über die Präfekturgrenzen hinaus bekannt ist der Markenname der Ōta-Brauerei: „Benten Musume“ (辨天娘 / べんてんむすめ).
Dabei schien das Schicksal der Brauerei schon 1992 besiegelt, als man (aufgrund des drastischen Bevölkerungsrückgangs in der ländlichen Gemeinde) nicht mehr genügend Sake-Braumeister zur Aufrechterhaltung der Produktion fand und diese einstellen musste. Erst 2002 konnte die Produktion wieder mit zunächst 1.080 Litern Sake aufgenommen werden.
Und seit 2010 ist man so stolz darauf, seinen Sake nur mit lokalen Ingredienzien herzustellen, dass man auch die Namen der Reisbauern auf seinen Sakeflaschen mit angibt.
Ich mache sonst ja eher keine plumpe Reklame auf dieser Seite – aber die Brauerfamilie war dermaßen gastfreundlich, dass ich mich zu einer Ausnahme hingerissen fühle.

Lageplan der Ōta Sake-Brauerei:

Und da Sightseeing ja bekanntlich hungrig macht, gönnen Sie sich einen kleinen Imbiss, z.B. im “Dining Café Arata” (ダイニングカフェー新 / あらた) – Voraussetzung ist, sie mögen Schweinefleisch, denn das ist die Spezialität des Hauses. Das Restaurant ist in einem ganz besonders prächtigen und gut ausgestatteten, traditionellen Stadthaus untergebracht.

Lageplan des Restaurants “Arata”:

Ebenfalls auf dem Gebiet der Gemeinde befindet sich der besonders mystisch wirkende Tempel Fudōin Iwayadō (不動院岩屋堂 / ふどういんいわやどう), der auf eine Gründung im Jahre 806 zurückgeht und bis ins Mittelalter Teil eines größeren Temple-Ensembles war (wobei andere Quellen von einer Errichtung in der Muromachi-Zeit (1333-1392) sprechen). Es wird gesagt, dass er als einziges Gebäude die Zerstörungen des Jahres 1581 (Hideyoshi Toyotomis Überfall auf Inaba) überstanden hat. In den 50er Jahren des vergangenen Jahrhunderts wurde umfangreich restauriert und das Bauwerk 1953 als wichtiges Kulturgut des Landes anerkannt. Außerdem gehört er zu den 100 populärsten Gebäuden der Präfektur. Und das aus gutem Grund, denn schon der Umstand, dass er in 13 Metern Höhe in eine Höhle eingepasst wurde, macht ihn bemerkenswert.

Aber beachten Sie auch die Details: Der Fudōin Iwayadō ist auch die Heimstätte einer kleinen, hölzernen Statue, die vor Jahrhunderten geschnitzt wurde. Der Legende nach war es Kōbō-Daishi (der Gründer des Shingon Buddhism) selbst, der sie geschaffen hat (d.h. sie ist über 1.200 Jahre alt). Außerdem erzählt man sich, dass diese kleine Statue auf wundersame Weise die Zerstörungen der Vergangenheit überdauert hat, weil sie die Gottheit des Feuers repräsentiert. Zweimal jährlich (jeweils am 28. März und 28. Juli) werden hier heilige Feuerrituale (goma / 護摩 / ごま) durchgeführt und die Statue bei der Gelegenheit der Öffentlichkeit zugänglich gemacht.

Direkt rechts neben dem Fudōin Iwayadō kommt man am nicht weniger verträumt unter hohen Bäumen und vor einer steilen Felsfand stehenden Iwaya Jinja (岩屋神社 / いわやじんじゃ) vorbei – der schon aufgrund seines surreal wirkenden, grün bemoosten Zugangs ungewöhnlich wirkt.

Lageplan des Fudōin Iwayadō:

Wenn Sie in Tottori sind, sollten Sie also ein paar Gründe haben, einen Abstecher in dieses leicht zu erreichende Gebirgsdorf zu machen. Ich bin mir ziemlich sicher, dass Sie sich seinem Charme und der Freundlichkeit seiner Bewohner kaum entziehen können werden.

Und wenn Sie an weiteren Orten und Einrichtungen in Tottori interessiert sind, schauen Sie doch auch mal hier vorbei:

Kurayoshi (倉吉)
– Die Stadt der weißen Mauern und roten Dächer

Kotoura-chō (琴浦町)
– Bayerische Stuckmeister, aufgepasst!

Tottori Sand-Museum (砂の美術館)
– Eine Weltreise in Sand

Tottori Volkskunst-Museum (鳥取民芸美術館)
– Schauen und Staunen dank Shōya Yoshida


Tōkyō Tennō-ji – 東京天王寺

23. September 2013

Peace of a graveyard, a gambling disposition & a double suicide arson 

A German version of this posting you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

The cemetary of Yanaka (谷中霊園 / やなかれいえん) (previously: 谷中墓地 / やなかぼち) is well-known among domestic and overseas’ tourists alike. First of all for its gorgeous, old cherry trees and the splendour of the cherry blossom season (late March/early April). Nevertheless, this part of the Taitō ward (台東区 / たいとうく) has its very particular charm and is worth more than just a visit at any time of the year. On the one hand it’s one of the prettiest in Tōkyō, on the other hand it’s also very rich in history. The Yanaka quarter (谷中 / やなか) is also one of the best-kept “Shitamachi” (下町 / したまち) – as the old downtowns of Tōkyō are called. It was here where artists of a colours took up their residence already during the late Edo period and the early Meiji period (second half of the 19th century. And the fact that Yanaka is still providing a bit of this charming period of time, may be one of the reasons why it is so popular with domestic tourists as well as those coming from abroad.

Cemetaries may not be the prime object for a tourist’s interest. And that may also be for the best, since one shouldn’t exaggerate his/her interest for them – after all, graves are, especially in Japan, a very personal place and play a decidedly important role in a family’s life and history. And as such they should be respected. Nevertheless, the wide paths and streets, lined with old cherry trees, that lead through the cemetary, are an invitation to a stroll.

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

The temple we are about to take a closer look at, the Tennō-ji (天王寺 / てんのうじ), can be easily reached via the north exit of Nippori station (日暮里駅 / にっぽりえき) – it’s just brief walk away, crossing the cemetary in southern direction. Or you take the more direct south exit of Nippori station, leading to the temple’s grounds directly.

The Tennō-ji, which dates back to the year 1274, saw its greatest prosperity during the Edo period (1603 to 1868), when it was one of the three most important temples of the old Edo (today: Tōkyō) – and one of the largest as well. Everything we can see today – as pretty as it may be –  represents just a tenth of the temple’s previous extent. But that may also just prove that “less can be more”.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

In the early years of the Tokugawa shōguns, in 1643, an impressive five-storied pagoda was built (some sources mention the year 1644) – with a total height of almost 35 metres (at that time) the tallest of its kind in the Kantō region (just to give you some comparison: the slightly older but nontheless gorgeous pagoda of the Honmon-ji (本門寺 / ほんもんじ) in Ikegami (池上 / いけがみ) in the southern Ōta ward (大田区 / おおたく), is just roughly 30 metres tall, while the five-storied pagoda of the Sensō-ji (浅草寺 / せんそうじ) in Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) has a height of whopping 48 metres).

In 1772 the pagoda burnt down (also here, some sources mention the year 1771) and was re-built in 1791. The wooden structure was renovated in 1884 and handed over the city of Taitō in 1908. It became a very popular spot and also the landmark of Yanaka, until, on 6th of July 1957, it was consumed by flames in a very dramatic event, which made it to the history books as the “double suicide arson”. Two lovers (presumably a young seamstress and a married man) committed suicide together – their boddies were found in the ruins of the pagoda, charred beyond recongnition. The public showed little sympathy for the couple, as people couldn’t forgive them the destruction of a much beloved cultural asset.

Tennō-ji (天王寺) - Five Storied Pagoda (foundation)

Tennō-ji (天王寺) – Five Storied Pagoda (foundation)

Tennō-ji (天王寺) - Five Storied Pagoda (foundation)

Tennō-ji (天王寺) – Five Storied Pagoda

Originally, there was no plan to re-built the pagoda. However, in 2007 some older blueprints of the pagode were found that brought up the idea of its reconstruction. Nevertheless, only the foundation stones of the pagoda can be seen today.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Many may not know that: Also in the old days in Japan, religious institutions found ways to the money of their followers, and they weren’t too picky about the methods. As one of most important temples of its time, in 1700 the Tennō-ji was granted the rights to hold lotteries. These lotteries became more and more popular and finally led to such an amount of agitation that this form of “licence to print money” was withdrawn again in 1842.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

One of the remaining witnesses of the “golden age” of the Tennō-ji is the larger-than-life copper statue of buddha, which you will see on the left hand side when entering the temple’s grounds. This remarkable statue was created in 1690 and initially placed at the right side of the main hall of the temple. In 1874 it was moved for the first time, and again in 1993 when it was renovated and moved to its present location, now “residing” on a ferroconcrete foundation. Five years later a carnel house was established in this foundation.

In any case, this buddha statue is known for its huge popularity during the Edo- and Meiji period and was, in loving respect, called “Tennō-ji Daibutsu” (天王寺大仏 / てんおうじだいぶつ).

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Naturally, it’s a legitimate notion, to walk in the steps of an eventful past while being in a neighbourhood that is practically soaked in history. Since Yanaka was so popular among the noted artist of its time, it comes as no surprise that also some of the popular Japanese writers’ and fine artists’ graves can be found in Yanaka’s cemetary.

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des Kikuchi Yosai

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) grave of Kikuchi Yosai

However, it is the end of one of the most crucial ages of Japanese history, the so-called “Edo period” (江戸時代 / えどじだい) that is “documented in stone” here. This era (1603 to 1868), when the shōguns of the Tokugawa (徳川 / とくがわ)-clan held the military and political power over the whole country, came to an end with the 15th (hence, the last) ruling head of the Tokugawa family, with Tokugawa Yoshinobu (徳川慶喜 / とくがわよしのぶ) (1837-1913). This last shōgun had, unsuccessfully, tried to carefully reform the aging (and ailing) shogunate. Neverthless, in 1868 he had to surrender to the troups of the emperor. With him a form of military goverment that may be unique to Japan came to an end that had lasted from the Kamakura period (1193 to 1333), to the Muromachi period (1336 to 1573) and finally the Edo period. Through all these centuries the emperor’s functions were mostly limited to representative ones – with a very brief period of exception (1333 to 1336) when the Go-Daigo emperor (後醍醐天皇 / ごだいごてんのう) had made his own son, Prince Morinaga, shōgun.

Nevertheless, there was obviously some sort of reconciliation between the emperor and the last Tokugawa shōgun, because in 1902 Yoshinobu was granted the rank of a prince. And in 1908 the “Order of the Rising Sun” (旭日章 / きょくじつしょう) was bestowed upon him. Anyway, the grave of the last shōgun ever of Japan can be found in the southeastern part the cemetary of Yanaka. It surprises more by its modesty – especially if one compares it with the grand gravesites of the early shōgunes in Nikkō.

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des letzten Tokugawa Shoguns

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) grave of the last Tokugawa shogun

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des letzten Tokugawa Shoguns

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) grave of the last Tokugawa shogun

And should your mind have enough of legendary grounds and history after all that, why don’t you take a leisurely stroll through the streets and alleys of Yanaka.

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

While you are planning to see this part of Tōkyō, why don’t you also have a look at the following:

Ueno Kōen / Yanaka Sakura (Engl./dt.)
– Kirschblüte
– Cherry Blossoms

Nezu Jinja (根津神社) (Engl./dt.)
– 2000 Jahre Geschichte
– 2000 years of history

Azaleen / Azalea-Festival (つつじ祭) (Engl./dt.)
– Nezu Jinja im Rausch der Farben
– Nezu Jinja’s Blaze of Colours


Tōkyō Tennō-ji – 東京天王寺

22. September 2013

Friedhofsstille, Kasinomentalität & Freitod in den Flammen 

An English version of this posting you can find here.
Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Der Friedhof von Yanaka (谷中霊園 / やなかれいえん) (früher: 谷中墓地 / やなかぼち) ist eigentlich in erster Linie für seine prächtigen, alten Kirschbäume berühmt und deswegen während der Kirschblüte (Ende März/Anfang April) nicht nur bei ausländischen Besuchern besonders beliebt. Allerdings ist diese Ecke des Stadtbezirks Taitō (台東区 / たいとうく) zu jeder Jahreszeit mehr als einfach nur einen Besuch wert, weil sie einerseits zu den hübschesten Tōkyōs gehört, andererseits auch eine der geschichtsträchtigsten ist. Das Yanaka-Viertel (谷中 / やなか) bietet eine der am besten gepflegten, „Shitamachi“ (下町 / したまち) genannten, alten Unterstädte Tōkyōs, wo sich schon während der späten Edo-Zeit und der frühen Meiji-Zeit (zweite Hälfte des 19. Jahrhunderts) Künstler jedweder Couleur besonders wohl gefühlt haben. Deswegen ist das Viertel gerade heute wieder bei Touristen aus dem In- und Ausland beliebt, weil Yanaka immer noch einen Hauch der alten Zeit vermittelt.

Friedhöfe mögen sich nicht als Objekte touristischen Interesses anbieten, und in gewisser Weise sollte man es mit seinem Interesse hierfür auch nicht übertreiben – schließlich sind Grabstätten gerade in Japan ganz natürlicher, ja integraler Bestandteil des Familienlebens und sollten deswegen auch entsprechend respektiert werden. Aber die breiten, kirschbaumbestandenen Wege und Straßen, die durch den großen Friedhof führen, laden natürlich schon zum Flanieren ein.

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園)

Den Tempel, den es hier näher zu betrachten gilt, den Tennō-ji (天王寺 / てんのうじ), erreichen Sie vom Nordausgang des Bahnhofs Nippori (日暮里駅 / にっぽりえき) nach einem kurzen Spaziergang durch den Friedhof in südlicher Richtung. Oder Sie nehmen den noch direkter zum Tempelgelände führenden Südausgang des Bahnhofs Nippori.

Der Tennō-ji, der auf eine Gründung aus dem Jahre 1274 zurück geht, erlebte während der Edo-Zeit (1603 bis 1868) eine regelrechte Blüte und gehörte zu den drei bedeutendsten Tempeln des alten Edo (heute: Tōkyō) – und zu den größten obendrein. Die heute noch vorhandenen Einrichtungen – so hübsch sie auch sind – stellen nur noch ungefähr ein Zehntel des damaligen Ausmaßes des Tempels dar. Aber vielleicht sind gerade sie schlagender Beweis dafür, dass weniger auch mehr sein kann.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Im Jahr 1643 wird eine fünfstöckige Pagode gebaut (einige Quellen nennen das Jahr 1644) – die mit einer Höhe von fast 35 Metern die höchste ihrer Art in der Kantō-Region gewesen sein soll (zum Vergleich: die nur etwas ältere, durchaus stattliche Pagode des Honmon-ji (本門寺 / ほんもんじ) in Ikegami (池上 / いけがみ) im südlichen Stadtteil Ōta (大田区 / おおたく), bringt es auf „nur“ knapp 30 Meter, die große 5-stöckige Pagode am Sensō-ji (浅草寺 / せんそうじ) in Asakusa (浅草 / あさくさ) allerdings auf wuchtige 48 Meter).

Im Jahr 1772 brennt die Pagode ab (hier wird übrigens auch das Jahr 1771 als Datum genannt) und wird bereits 1791 wieder neu errichtet (immerhin hierin scheinen sich die Quellen einig zu sein). 1884 erfährt die hölzerne Pagode eine Renovierung und wird 1908 an die Stadt übergeben. Sie gilt als beliebtes Ausflugsziel und ist sozusagen das alles überragende Wahrzeichen Yanakas, bis sie am 6. Juli 1957 unter ganz besonders tragischen Umständen erneut ein Raub der Flammen wird. Der Vorfall sollte als „Doppelsuizid-Brandstiftung“ in die Geschichte eingehen, als hier ein Liebespaar (höchst wahrscheinlich eine junge Näherin und ein verheirateter Mann – die Leichen waren zu sehr verkohlt, um definitive Rückschlüsse auf die Opfer zuzulassen) gemeinsam Selbstmord beging. Die Bevölkerung zeigte sich entsetzt von der rücksichtslosen Zerstörung eines einmaligen Kulturguts – ein Wiederaufbau wurde nicht in Erwägung gezogen.

Tennō-ji (天王寺) - Five Storied Pagoda (foundation)

Tennō-ji (天王寺) – Grundmauern der fünfstöckigen Pagode

Tennō-ji (天王寺) - Five Storied Pagoda (foundation)

Tennō-ji (天王寺) – Five Storied Pagoda (historische Ansicht)

Allerdings gibt es seit 2007 doch wieder Bestrebungen, die Pagode, basierend auf alten Skizzen, neu zu errichten. Heute zeugen nur die Grundsteine vom Standort der Pagode.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Was vielen vielleicht gar nicht bewusst ist: In den Methoden, den Gläubigen das Geld aus der Tasche zu ziehen, war man auch in alten Zeiten nicht zimperlich. Als einem der ganz wichtigen Tempel seiner Zeit wurde es dem Tennō-ji im Jahre 1700 erlaubt, Lotterien abzuhalten. Diese entwickelten sich zum regelrechten Publikumsmagneten und nahmen schließlich dermaßen Überhand, dass diese Form der „Lizenz zum Gelddrucken“ bis 1842 wieder verboten wurde.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Von der „goldenen“ Zeit des Tennō-ji kündet heute u.a. auch noch die überlebensgroße kupferne Buddhastatue des Tempels, die man gleich bei Betreten des Tempelgeländes linker Hand erblickt. Diese bemerkenswerte Statue wurde 1690 geschaffen und stand ursprünglich auf der rechten Seite des Hauptgebäudes des Tempels. 1874 durfte sie zum ersten Mal „umziehen“ und gelangte schließlich 1933, anlässlich einer Renovierung, an ihren jetzigen Standort, wo man ihr ein Stahlbetonfundament gebaut hatte. Fünf Jahre später wurde im Fundament ein Beinhaus eingerichtet. Jedenfalls ist die Buddhastatue bekannt dafür, dass sie sich schon in der Edo- und Meiji-Zeit großer Popularität erfreut hat und liebevoll „Tennō-ji Daibutsu“ (天王寺大仏 / てんおうじだいぶつ) genannt wurde.

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Tennō-ji (天王寺)

Natürlich ist es völlig legitim, einen Besuch auf einem der größten und geschichtsträchtigsten Tempel- und Friedhofsgelände zum Wandeln auf Spuren der Vergangenheit zu nutzen. Schon aufgrund seiner Beliebtheit Yanakas in Künstlerkreisen, sind hier die Grabstätten zahlreicher bekannter japanischer Schriftsteller und bildender Künstler zu finden.

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des Kikuchi Yosai

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des Kikuchi Yosai

Allerdings findet hier auch eine der entscheidensten Epochen der japanischen Geschichte, die so genannte oder auch „Edo-Zeit“ (江戸時代 / えどじだい) die steingewordene Dokumentation ihres Endes. Diese Zeit (1603 bis 1868), in der die Shōgune aus dem Tokugawa (徳川 / とくがわ)-Clan die politische und militärische Macht im Lande inne hatten, endete mit dem 15. (und damit letzten) Oberhaupt dieser Familie, mit Tokugawa Yoshinobu (徳川慶喜 / とくがわよしのぶ) (1837-1913). Dieser letzte Shōgun hatte versucht, die bröckelnde Macht des Clans durch vorsichtige Reformen am Leben zu erhalten. Erfolglos, wie die Geschichte uns lehrt – 1868 musste er vor den kaiserlichen Truppen kapitulieren. Mit ihm fand auch diese über viele Jahrhunderte die japanische Geschichte prägende Form der Militärregierung, die von der Kamakura-Zeit (1193 bis 1333) über die Muromachi-Zeit (1336 bis 1573) und schließlich mit der Edo-Zeit die politische Landschaft geprägt hatte – Zeiten, in denen dem Kaiser meist nur rein repräsentative Funktionen zugestanden wurden (1333 bis 1336 nur kurz unterbrochen durch die Ambitionen des Kaisers Go-Daigo (後醍醐天皇 / ごだいごてんのう), der seinen Sohn, den Prinzen Morinaga, zum Shōgun ernannt hatte).

Allerdings muss es wohl später zu einer Art „Aussöhnung“ mit dem Kaiserhaus gekommen sein, denn Yoshinobu wurde 1902 in den Rang eines Fürsten erhoben. Außerdem erhielt er 1908 den vom Kaiser verliehenen „Orden der aufgehenden Sonne“ (旭日章 / きょくじつしょう). Jedenfalls befindet sich die Grabstätte des absolut letzten Shōguns in Japan im südöstlichen Abschnitt des Friedhofs von Yanaka. Sie überrascht eigentlich eher durch Bescheidenheit – besonders wenn man sie mit dem Prunk der Grabstätten der ersten Tokugawa Shōgune in Nikkō vergleicht.

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des letzten Tokugawa Shoguns

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des letzten Tokugawa Shoguns

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des letzten Tokugawa Shoguns

Yanaka Reien (谷中霊園) Grab des letzten Tokugawa Shoguns

Und wenn Ihnen dann der Sinn nicht mehr nach berühmten Namen und geschichtsschwangerem Untergrund ist, schlendern Sie einfach ein bisschen durch das malerische Yanaka.

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Yanaka (谷中)

Und wenn Sie schon planen, in diese Ecke Tōkyōs zu gehen, sehen Sie sich auch das Folgende an:

Ueno Kōen / Yanaka Sakura (Engl./dt.)
– Kirschblüte
– Cherry Blossoms

Nezu Jinja (根津神社) (Engl./dt.)
– 2000 Jahre Geschichte
– 2000 years of history

Azaleen / Azalea-Festival (つつじ祭) (Engl./dt.)
– Nezu Jinja im Rausch der Farben
– Nezu Jinja’s Blaze of Colours


Shibamata – 柴又

19. February 2012

Die Welt des Tora-san – oder: „es ist hart, ein Mann zu sein“…
Tora-san’s World – or: „it’s hard to be a man“…

Unsere Reise führt uns heute ganz in den Nordosten Tōkyōs, in die Heimat von „Tora-san“(寅さん / とらさん), eines der wohl beliebtesten japanischen Filmhelden.

Today’s trip brings us to the northeast of Tōkyō, to the hometown of „Tora-san“ (寅さん / とらさん), probably one of the most popular movie heroes of Japan.

Tora-san (寅さん)

Tora-san (寅さん)

Im Stadtteil Katsushika (葛飾 / かつしか) liegt Shibamata (柴又 / しばまた) direkt am Westufer des Edo-Flusses (江戸川 / えどがわ). Und dort befindet sich nicht nur ein wirklich sehr uriges Unterstadtviertel (下町 / したまち), sondern eben auch der (Film-)Wohnort des sympathischen Antihelden der japanischen „Tora-san“ Film-Staffel, die lange Zeit als der „langlebigste“ Vertreter ihres Genres galt: In den Jahren von 1969 bis 1995 wurden 48 Filme mit dem beliebten Schauspieler Atsumi Kiyoshi (渥美・清 / あつみ・きよし) als „Tora-san“ (der eigentlich Kuruma Torajirō (車・寅次郎 / くるま・とらじろう) heißt) gedreht. Der liebenswerte Held verdingt sich als Händler auf den Straßen und auf Märkten im ganzen Land, geht – regelmäßig erfolglosen – Liebschaften nach und kehrt am Ende jeder Reise nach Shibamata zurück. Die schier endlose Serie von Filmen stand unter dem Motto „男はつらいよ” (おとこはつらいよ) – „Es ist hart, ein Mann zu sein!“

In Tōkyō’s Katsushika (葛飾 / かつしか) district there is a place called Shibamata (柴又 / しばまた), right on the west banks of the Edo river (江戸川 / えどがわ). And there is where you not only find the most quaint downtown (下町 / したまち), but also the (movie-) home of the likeable antihero of the Japanese “Tora-san“-movie series. With 48 movies made between 1969 and 1995 these film series used to be considered the longest running movie series in the world. The leading part of all 48 movies was played by the popular actor, Atsumi Kiyoshi (渥美・清 / あつみ・きよし) as “Tora-san“ (the character’s full name was Kuruma Torajirō (車・寅次郎 / くるま・とらじろう)). This amiable character was a small dealer who used to sell his goods all over Japan. And in each episode he – unsuccessfully – fell in love with a beautiful woman (usually far off his reach) and always returned home to Shibamata at the end of each trip. This long-running serie’s motto was “男はつらいよ” (おとこはつらいよ) – “It’s hard to be a man!”

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Kein Wunder also, dass Shibamata so etwas wie ein „Tora-san Dorf“ geworden ist. Und da die meisten Ausländer mit Tora-san nicht viel anfangen können, bleiben die Japaner hier bei Ihren Pilgerfahrten zu Tora-san auch überwiegend unter sich. Allerdings heißt das nicht, dass Shibamata deswegen für ausländische Besucher weniger interessant wäre. Schon allein die Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道 / たいしゃくてんさんどう), die Straße, die unweit des Bahnhofs von Shibamata schnurgerade auf den wichtigsten Tempel des Ortes, den Taishakuten (帝釈天 / たいしゃくてん), zuführt, ist einen Ausflug hierher wert. Hier reiht sich altes Stadthaus an altes Stadthaus – alles wieder sehr adrett zurecht gemacht, aber trotzdem ein Lebensgefühl vermittelnd, wie es das seit mindestens 60 Jahren in Tōkyō eigentlich gar nicht mehr gibt. In den Erdgeschossen der Häuser sind kleine Handwerks-, überwiegend aber Snack- und Gastronomiebetriebe untergebracht. Natürlich treiben alle einen schwunghaften Handel unter dem Signum des Filmstars, aber die kleinen Leckereien, die man hier kaufen kann, sind absolut authentisch. Wer auf japanisches Reisgebäck (煎餅 / せんべい) steht, kommt hier voll auf seine Kosten.

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道) - Tora-san himself....

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道) – Tora-san himself….

No wonder, Shibamata has become something of a “Tora-san village”. And since most foreigners don’t know much about Tors-san, it’s mostly Japanese tourists who come to visit Shibamata and to worship their movie-idol. But that doesn’t mean at all that Shibamata hasn’t anything interesting to offer to foreign visitors. The Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道 / たいしゃくてんさんどう) alone, die little street in the vicinity of the Shibamata station which leads to most important temple of the village, the Taishakuten (帝釈天 / たいしゃくてん) is worth the trip.

Taishakuten Sandō - Tora-san-ya (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō – Tora-ya (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

A long row of old town houses, carefully restored, transport a way of life that seems to have been lost decades ago in Tōkyō. There are numerous little shops on the street level in almost each and every house, selling handicraft or little snacks. Naturally, they all advertise with “Tora-san”, but the tiny delicacies you can buy here are absolutely authentic. Everyone who as a faible for Japanese rice crackers (煎餅 / せんべい) will be in heaven here.

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Taishakuten Sandō (帝釈天参道)

Magischer Anziehungspunkt Shibamatas ist natürlich der Taishakuten (帝釈天 / たいしゃくてん), der Haupttempel des Ortes, der auf eine Gründung aus dem Jahre 1629 zurück geht. Die ganze Tempelanlage erweckt den Anschein eines uralten Ensembles, auch wenn die meisten der heute zu sehenden Gebäude aus dem späten 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert stammen. Eine Kiefer mit grotesk weit ausladenden Ästen rahmt das Hauptgebäude des Tempels förmlich ein. Der für den Besucher eigentliche Schatz des Tempels befindet sich an den Außenwänden der inneren Kammer des Hauptgebäudes: die gigantischen hölzernen Relief-Schnitzereien, die Szenen aus der Lotos-Sutra darstellen (die Heilslehre der Lotos-Sutra wird emanzipierten Frauen kaum mehr behagen als die Abwertung, die sie in anderen Religionen erkennen mögen). Das komplette Gebäude ist förmlich in diese filigranen Schnitzwerke aus der frühen Shōwa-Zeit gehüllt. Um die empfindlichen Strukturen vor Witterungseinflussen zu schützen, ist dieser Gebäudeteil mit einem Glasbau ummantelt worden – man kann sich die Kunstwerke also auch bei schlechtem Wetter trockenen Fußes anschauen. Aber Vorsicht: Dieser Bereich des Tempels ist nur ohne Schuhe zu betreten – wer Angst vor kalten Füßen hat, sollte seinen Besuch hier möglichst nicht in die kalte Jahreszeit verlegen.

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

The center of attraction is, naturally, the Taishakuten (帝釈天 / たいしゃくてん), the main temple of Shibamata which dates back to a foundation in the year 1629. The whole temple plot has the appearance of an ancient place, even though most of the buildings one can see today just date back the late 19th and early 20th century.
A particularly gorgeous old pine-tree seems to embrace the temple’s main building with its bizarre branches.
However, the real treasure for visitors can only be found on the exterior walls of the inner chamber of the temple’s main building complex. These walls have been covered with wood carvings which can only be called magnificent. These masterpieces which actually encase the whole building, were crafted in the early years of the Shōwa period and depict scenes from the Lotos Sutra (which emancipated women may just find as little appealing as the doctrines of salvation transported by other religions).
In order to protect the filigrane wooden works of art, the outer walls of the temple building have been enshrined behind glass – even on a rainy day you can admire them without needing to fear to get wet. However you should keep in mind: You are not allowed to enter the temple’s inner premises wearing shoes. If cold feet are something you’d like to avoid, don’t come here during the cold seasons.

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Ebenso sehenswert sind die Funktionsräume und der romantische Landschaftsgarten des Tempels, die sich direkt hinter den Hauptgebäuden in östlicher Richtung anschließen. Auch hier gilt: In der kalten Jahreszeit sind gefrorene Füße vorprogrammiert! Besonders sehenswert: Die große Empfangshalle und die mit dem Holz eines uralten Himmelsbambus (Nandine) aufwändig gestaltete Schmucknische (Tokonoma /床の間 / とこのま).
Den Garten kann man auch trockenen (wenngleich dann zu gegebener Jahreszeit auch frostigen) Fußes umrunden. 1984 wurde ein überdachter Holzsteg angelegt.

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Just as worth seeing are the functional rooms and the romantic landscape garden in the backyard of the temple. Once more: if you mind cold feet, don’t come here in winter! Particularly interesting: the great reception hall and the lavish tokonoma (床の間 / とこのま) with its ancient branches of “sacred bamboo” (nandina).
The garden has been furnished with a roofed boardwalk  in 1984, hence it can be explored with dry feed (but since you are not allowed to wear shoes in this area, you may also be threatened by cold feed during the winter season).

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Taishakuten (帝釈天)

Wer noch mehr auf den Spuren Tora-sans wandeln möchte, findet wenige Schritte südlich des Taishakuten auch das „Tora-san-Museum“.
Those who are interested in the movie world of Tora-san may have a look at the Tora-san museum in the south of the Taishakuten.

Für den weniger dem japanischen Film Verschriebenen ist dagegen das Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭 / やまもとてい) empfohlen, das sich genau zwischen dem Tempel und dem Museum befindet.
Es handelt sich hierbei um ein sehr schönes (allerdings auch sehr rares) Beispiel großbürgerlichen Wohnens in der späten Taishō-Zeit (大正時代 / たいしょうじだい) bzw. frühen Shōwa-Zeit (昭和時代 / しょうわじだい) (20er und 30er Jahre des 20. Jahrhunderts). Das vergleichsweise weitläufige Ensemble umschließt einen üppigen japanischen Garten. Während alle wesentlichen Gebäudeteile im japanischen Stil errichtet und auch ausgestattet wurden, gibt es direkt neben dem ursprünglichen Haupteingang des Gebäudes einen gemauerten Anbau, in dem ein Salon im westlichen Stil untergebracht ist. Das ebenfalls gemauerte (ehemalige) Haupteingangstor, das Nagaya-Tor (長屋門 / ながやもん) lässt auch schon erahnen, dass der damalige Bauherr (ein Optik-Fabrikant) einen gewissen Status unter Beweis stellen wollte.

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

All those less interested in contemporary Japanese movies, the Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭 / やまもとてい), located just between the temple and the museum, may be a recommendation. It represents a fine and rather rare example for upper-class living during the late Taishō-era (大正時代 / たいしょうじだい) or the early Shōwa-era (昭和時代 / しょうわじだい) respectively (20s and 30s of the 20. century). This relatively spacious building complex encloses a lush Japanese garden. And whilst all major parts of the building are fitted in the Japanese style (externally as well as internally), there is also a brick-stone annex next to the (original) main entrance of the property, which houses a western style drawing room. Also the brick-built main gate, the Nagaya-gate (長屋門 / ながやもん), gives an impression of what the principal of the house had in mind: to impress the neighbours and to represent his status of wealth.

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Yamamoto-Tei (山本亭)

Wer sich nach dem Betondschungel Tōkyōs nach etwas Weite sehnt, sollte nicht darauf verzichten, den Deich zu erklimmen, der Shibamata vor den Fluten des Edo-Flusses schützt. Das weite Flussbett und die Grünflächen beiderseits des Flusses stellen schon einen gewissen Kontrast zu der Enge in der Stadt dar. Außerdem verläuft durch den Fluss auch die Grenze zwischen der Metropol-Präfektur Tōkyō und der sich im Osten anschließenden und bis zum Pazifik erstreckenden Nachbarpräfektur Chiba.

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

Und dort wartet eine ganz besondere Attraktion, die man im lärmenden Großstadtgetriebe kaum erwarten würde: Der Fluss kann auf einer von einem Fährmann rudernd betriebenen Fähre (Yagiri-no Watashi / 矢切の渡し / やぎりのわたし) überquert werden – ein Erlebnis, das man sich auf keinen Fall entgehen lassen sollte, auch wenn auf der anderen Seite des Edo-Flusses nur weite Felder auf den Besucher warten (aber die können, wenn man aus der Enge der Monsterstadt kommt, ja auch mal ganz schön sein). Die Fähre, die seit der Edo-Zeit verkehrt, wird in Liedern besungen – “Yagiri-no Watashi” kennt fast jeder Japaner. Und wer das Lied (im Original von Naomi Chiaki gesungen) einmal gehört hat, bekommt einen Eindruck von der Gemächlichkeit der Fährfahrt (die Gemächlichkeit kann im Bedarfsfalle aber durch den Einsatz starker Außenbordmotoren aufgehoben werden).

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

And if you are just yearning for a little refuge of vastness after all the time in the concrete jungle of Tōkyō, don’t miss to climb up the embankment which protects Shibamata from the waters of the Edo-river. The wide expanse of the river channel and the grassed areas provide quite a contrast to the constrictions of the big city. Furthermore, the border between the metropolitan prefecture of Tōkyō and the neighbouring prefecture of Chiba, which stretches from here to the Pacific’s shores, runs right through the middle of the river.

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

There a very special attraction is awaiting the visitor – an attaction one wouldn’t expect in the noise of the mega-city: You can cross the river by a man-powered ferry-boat (Yagiri-no Watashi / 矢切の渡し / やぎりのわたし). An adventure, you souldn’t miss, even though there are only wide fields to be expected on the other side of the Edo river (but they can be quite charming, expecially for those how are suffering from the congestions in the big city). The ferry which has been in service since Edo-times is being sung about in famous songs – “Yagiri-no Watashi” (矢切の渡し / やぎりのわたし) is as song almost every Japanese knows. And everyone who has heard the original recording by Naomi Chiaki can imagine the slow pace of the ferry crossing the Edo river (this pace can, however, be considerably speeded up, if needed, when the available outboard engins are activated).

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

Yagiri-no watashi (矢切の渡し)

Wie man hinkommt:
Es führen so viele Wege nach Shibamata, dass es schwer ist, den praktischsten auszuwählen. Wer aus der Innenstadt Tōkyōs anreist und gar zu häufiges Umsteigen vermeiden möchte, sollte folgenes in Erwägung ziehen:
Ab Nippori (日暮里 / にっぽり) mit der Keisei-Linie (Hauptstrecke zwischen Tōkyō und Narita) (京成本線 / けいせいほんせん) nach Takasago (高砂 / たかさご). Auf dieser Strecke können alle Züge genutzt werden (außer dem City-Liner, dem Morning-Liner, dem Evening-Liner und dem Sky-Liner.
Nach ca. 15 Minuten Fahrzeit ist noch mal ein völlig unkompliziertes Umsteigen in Takasago (高砂 / たかさご) erforderlich. Mit der Keisei Kanamachi-Linie (京成金町線 / けいせいかなまちせん) geht es von hier nur noch eine Station weiter (2 Minuten Fahrzeit) nach Shibamata (柴又 / しばまた).

Fahrtkosten ab Nippori: 260 Yen (Stand: 2015)

How to get here:
There are so many ways to Shibamata that it’s hard to recommend the most practical. For those coming from the central parts of Tōkyō and not wishing to change trains too often, the following might be a good choice:
Take the Keisei line (main line between Tōkyō and Narita) (京成本線 / けいせいほんせん) from Nippori (日暮里 / にっぽり) to Takasago (高砂 / たかさご). You may use any of the trains on this line, except the City Liner, the Morning Liner, the Evening Liner and the Sky Line.
After about 15 minutes you’ll have to change trains in Takasako (高砂 / たかさご) for two more minutes on the Keisei Kanamachi line (京成金町線 / けいせいかなまちせん) to Shibamata (柴又 / しばまた).

Transportation fee from Nippori: 260 Yen (as per 2015)

Eintrittsgebühr für Taishakuten:
Die Tempelanlage des Taishakuten ist zwar frei zugänglich. Für die Besichtigung des Gartens, der Empfangsräumlichkeiten und der grandiosen Holzschnitzereien ist allerdings eine Eintrittsgebühr von 400 Yen (Kinder bis zum Mittelschulalter: 200 Yen) zu entrichten (Stand: 2015).

Admission fee for the Taishakuten:
The temple’s plot and buildings can basically be entered free of charge. However, for a visit to the garden, the reception hall and the magnificent wood carvings there is an admission fee of 400 Yen (children up to high school pay 200 Yen) (as per 2015).

Öffnungszeiten / Eintrittsgebühr für das Yamamoto-Tei:
Täglich von 9 Uhr bis 17 Uhr (außer an jedem 3. Dienstag im Monat, bzw. Mittwoch, falls der Dienstag auf einen Feiertag fällt).
Eintrittsgebühr: 100 Yen (Stand: 2105)
(Wer das Kombinationsangebot für den Besuch des Yamamoto-Tei und des Tora-san-Museums in Anspruch nehmen möchte, spart 50 Yen.)

Opening hours / Admisstion fee for the Yamanote-Tei:
Daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (except every 3rd Tuesday of a month; closed on the respective Wednesday should the Tuesday be a national holiday).
Admission fee: 100 Yen (as per 2015)
(There is a combination offer for those who want to visit the Yamamoto-Tei es well as the Tora-san Museum, saving 50 Yen.)

Entgelt für die Fahrt mit der Fähre “Yagiri-no Watashi” (Stand: 2015):
Erwachsene: 200 Yen
Kinder: 100 Yen

Fee for the Ferry “Yagiri-no Watashi” (as per 2015):
Adults: 200 Yen
Children: 100 Yen

Betriebszeiten der Fähre “Yagiri-no Watashi”
Einen ganz eindeutigen Fahrplan konnte ich nicht finden. Auf der kleinen Webseite des Fährbetriebs werden “9 Uhr bis Sonnenuntergang” genannt, an anderen Stellen wird “10 Uhr bis 16 Uhr” genannt. Da die beiden Fährleute den Fährbetrieb aber in erster Linie am Fahrgastaufkommen ausrichten, fragen Sie nach dem Übersetzen sicherheitshalber nach der letzten Überfahrt des Tages, wenn Sie nicht in Chiba “stranden” wollen. Während der Wintermonate ist der Fährbetrieb offensichtlich nicht vorgesehen.

Operating Schedule for the Ferry “Yagiri-no Watashi”
I couldn’t find any definite schedule for the ferry. On the small website of the ferry operator it was mentioned that the ferries would run “from 9 am to sunset”, other sources mention “10 am to 4 pm”. Since the ferrymen run the “yagiri-no watashi” somewhat in accordance with customers’ demand, it’s probably not a bad idea to ask for the schedule of the last ferry of the day, if you don’t want to be grounded on the Chiba side of the river. There is obviously no ferry service during the winter season.


Nezu-Jinja – 根津神社

2. May 2009

2000 Jahre Geschichte / 2000 Years of History
(English text follows the German text)
(Der englische Text folgt dem deutschen)

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Etwas abseits der üblichen Touristenpfade der kaum 100 m weiter östlich liegenden, alten Shitamachi (下町 / したまち) von Yanaka (谷中 / やなか), befindet sich ein weiteres Juwel im Stadtteil Bunkyō-ku (文京区 / ぶんきょうく): der shintoistische Schrein, Nezu-jinja (根津神社 / ねづじんじゃ). Zum Jahreswechsel 2008/2009 hat man begonnen, die eindrucksvollen Schreingebäude zu renovieren. Hier sind sie noch einmal in dem – eigentlich auch schon recht ordentlichen – Zustand im Sommer 2008 zu sehen.

A bit off the beaten track of the tourists less than 100 meters east of the old shitamachi (下町 / したまち) of Yanaka (谷中 / やなか) one finds another gem in Tōkyō’s Bunkyō-ku (文京区 / ぶんきょうく): the Shintoistic shrine, Nezu-jinja (根津神社 / ねづじんじゃ). Since the end of 2008 the main buildings of the shrine have been undergoing a thorough renovation. The pictures you see here were taken in summer 2008 – when the shrine didn’t really look like being in need of renovation.

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社: Haupttor/Main Gate

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社: Haupttor/Main Gate

 

Das Hauptgebäude des Nezu-Jinja (根津神社 / ねづじんじゃ) stammt aus dem Jahre 1706, und die ganze Anlage ist so luxuriös und farbenfroh, dass man sich an die fast schon barocken Gebäude in Nikko erinnert fühlt. Der fünfte Tokugawa Shōgun, Tsunayoshi (綱吉 / つなよし, 1646-1709), hatte den Schrein in Auftrag gegeben – vom Schreingelände heißt es allerdings, dass es schon seit fast 2000 Jahren religiösen Zwecken gedient hat. Bei der Gelegenheit wurden auch die großen Mengen an Azaleen (“tsutsuji” / つつじ), die im Frühjahr ganz besonders großaritg blühen, gepflanzt. Von Mitte April bis Anfang Mai muss ein Teil des Gartens ein regelrechtes Blütenmeer darstellen.

Wenn Sie mal schauen möchten:
Azaleen-Festival (つつじ祭)
Nezu Jinja im Rausch der Farben

The main building of Nezu-Jinja (根津神社 / ねづじんじゃ) was built in 1706. The whole complex makes such a luxurious and colourful impression that it almost reminds one on the baroque buildings of Nikko. The fifth Tokugawa Shōgun, Tsunayoshi (綱吉 / つなよし, 1646-1709) had this shrine built. However, the area is said to be religious ground for almost two millennia. Also during the Tokugawa shōgunate the gardens of the complex were filled with azalea (“tsutsuji” / つつじ) which transform part of the gardens into an ocean of blossoms during the months of April and May.

If you want to have  a look:
Azalea-Festival (つつじ祭)
Nezu Jinja’s Blaze of Colours

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

 

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Während dieser frühen Edo-Jahre wurden Shintoismus und Buddhismus übrigens noch nicht so strikt getrennt, wie dies später (insbesondere in und nach den Jahren der Meiji-Restauration) der Fall war. Deswegen ist es wohl auch nicht verwunderlich, dass dieser Schrein von buddhistischen Symbolen nur so strotzt. Selbst buddhistische Tempel habe ich in der Tat selten  so über und über mit Hakenkreuzen übersät gesehen.

During the early Edo era there wasn’t the strict segregation between Buddhism and Shintoism which was enforced later (particularly during and after the Meiji-restauration). Therefore, one shouldn’t be surprised to find a great number of Buddhist symbols at this Shintoistic shrine. In fact, even at a Buddhistic temple I’ve hardly ever seen such a large number of swastika as on the buildings of Nezu-Jinja.

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

 

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Die ganze Anlage ist wesentlich sehenswerter, als ihr relative Unbekanntheit suggerieren würde: Neben den prächtigen Hauptgebäuden gib es ein prachtvolles Haupttor, mehrere Teiche mit Fischen und ganz besonders aufgeweckten Schildkröten. Hinter dem Haupttor ist eine Noh-Bühne vorhanden, und der umzäunte Innenhof des Schreins macht einen ganz besonders mystischen Eindruck. Der westliche Teil der Anlage ist nicht nur während der Azaleenblüte sehenswert, sondern während des ganzen Jahres. Die fast endlosen Tunnel von „torii“ (鳥居 / とりい), die auf der Parkanhöhe quer durch einen Hain führen, gehören in Tōkyō sicher zu den eindrucksvollsten.

The whole complex is much more worth seeing than its relative lack of fame would suggest. Apart from the gorgeous main building there is magnificent main gate, quite a number of ponds with fish and rather cheeky turtles. Behind the main gate there is a lovely Noh stage, and the fenced-in main building is of particular charm. The western part of the garden around Nezu-Jinja is not only famous for its azalea, but also for its endless tunnels of „torii“ (鳥居 / とりい) which make this part of the gardens worth a visit the whole year through. They are, for sure, some of the most impressive in Tōkyō.

 

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

Nezu-Jinja / 根津神社

 

Wie kommt man zum Nezu-Jinja?
Sofern man sich nicht ohnehin gerade auf einem Spaziergang durch das benachbarte Yanaka befindet, am besten mit den U-Bahnen der Chiyoda-Linie bis zur Station „Nezu“ (根津 / ねづ). Entlang der Shinobazu Dōri (不忍通り / しのばずどおり) geht es ca. 300 Meter in nördliche Richtung bis zur Ampel „Nezu-Jinja Iriguchi“ (根津神社入口 / ねづじんじゃいりぐち) und dann nach links vorbei an der „Nihon Christ“-Kirche zum Schreingelände.

Sollte man diese eher unscheinbare Abbiegung an der Ampel Nezu-Jinja Iriguchi verpasst haben – kein Problem, etwas mehr als 100 Meter weiter nördlich kann man die große Kreuzung „Sendagi-nichōme“ (千駄木二丁目 / せんだぎにちょうめ) nicht verpassen. Dort nach links abbiegen und noch ca. 100 Meter in westlicher Richtung laufen.

Das Schreingelände ist täglich geöffnet.
Eintritt frei.

How to get to Nezu-Jinja?
Unless you’re on a walk through Yanaka, just opposite of the Shinobazu Dōri (不忍通り / しのばずどおり), take the Chiyoda-line to „Nezu“ (根津 / ねづ). From here head north for about 300 meters along the Shinobazu Dōri (不忍通り / しのばずどおり). At the traffic light „Nezu-Jinja Iriguchi“ (根津神社入口 / ねづじんじゃいりぐち) turn left and pass the „Nihon Christ“ church on your way to the nearby entrance of Nezu-Jinja.

Should you have passed the turn at „Nezu-Jinja Iriguchi“ unnoticed – not to worry! Just walk along the Shinobazu Dōri for about 100 meters more until you reach the „Sendagi-nichōme“ (千駄木二丁目 / せんだぎにちょうめ) crossing. Turn left here and reach the northern gate of Nezu-Jinja after about 100 meters.

Nezu-Jinja is open daily.
No admission fee.