Toguri Museum of Art (戸栗美術館) – Tip

4. August 2017

Don’t miss the current exhibition!

Eine deutsche Version dieses Hinweises finden sie hier.
A German version of this tip you can find here.

Toguri Museum of Art: Imari Ware of the 17th Century

Since 27 Mai 2017 the Toguri Museum of Art (戸栗美術館) shows an – as always – exqisite collection of Japanese porcelain. The current exhibition that is open until 2 September 2017 shows the broad variety and the amazing development in the production of procelain in the Japan of the 17th century. It is a must for everyone who appreciates the particular charm of Japanese porcelain.

Toguri Museum of Art: Imari Ware of the 17th Century

For further information on the museum and details of previous exhibitions, have a look at the following postings:

 

Toguri Museum of Art (戸栗美術館) (Part 1)
– Japanese Porcelain at its Finest – Imari Ware
– The Ko-Kutani style
– (古九谷展)

Toguri Museum of Art (戸栗美術館) (Part 2)
– Japanese Porcelain at its Finest – Imari Ware
– Masterpieces of the Kakiemon and Kinrande style
– (柿右衛門・古伊万里金襴手展)

Toguri Museum of Art (戸栗美術館) (Part 3)
– Japanese Porcelain at its Finest
– Masterpieces of Nabeshima ware
– (鍋島焼展)

Toguri Museum of Art (戸栗美術館) (Part 4)
– Japanese Porcelain at its Finest
– Imari Ware – The Beauty of Sometsuke
– (古伊万里 – 染付の美展)

Toguri Museum of Art (戸栗美術館) (Part 5)
– Japanese Porcelain at its Finest
– The Toguri Collection: The Original Exhibition
– (戸栗コレクション1984・1985-revival-展)


Toguri Kunstmuseum (戸栗美術館) – Hinweis

4. August 2017

Verpassen Sie nicht die aktuelle Ausstellung!

Eine englische Version dieses Hinweises finden sie hier.
An English version of this tip you can find here.

Toguri Kunstmuseum: Imari Ware des 17. Jahrhunderts

Seit dem 27. Mai 2017 ist im Toguri Kunstmuseum (戸栗美術館) eine – wie immer – exquisite Sammlung japanischen Porzellans zu sehen. Die noch bis zum 2. September 2017 geöffnete Ausstellung zeigt das breite Spektrum und die stürmische Entwicklung, die die Fertigung von Porzellan im Japan des 17. Jahrhunderts genommen hat. Ein Muss für jeden, der den besonderen Charme japanischen Porzellans zu schätzen weiß.

Toguri Kunstmuseum: Imari Ware des 17. Jahrhunderts

Für weitere Informationen zum Museum und Details zu den vorangegangenen Ausstellungen, schauen Sie doch auch noch mal hier vorbei:

Toguri Kunstmuseum (戸栗美術館) (Teil 1)
– Japanisches Porzellan vom Feinsten – Imari Ware
– Der Ko-Kutani-Stil (古九谷展)

Toguri Kunstmuseum (戸栗美術館) (Teil 2)
– Japanisches Porzellan vom Feinsten – Imari Ware
– Meisterstücke des Kakiemon- und Kinrande-Stils
– (柿右衛門・古伊万里金襴手展)

Toguri Kunstmuseum (戸栗美術館) (Teil 3)
– Japanisches Porzellan vom Feinsten
– Meisterstücke des Nabeshima Porzellans
– (鍋島焼展)

Toguri Kunstmuseum (戸栗美術館) (Teil 4)
– Japanisches Porzellan vom Feinsten
– Imari Ware – Die Pracht von Sometsuke
– (古伊万里 – 染付の美展)

Toguri Kunstmuseum (戸栗美術館) (Teil 5)
– Japanisches Porzellan vom Feinsten
– Die Toguri-Sammlungen: Die Original-Ausstellung
– (戸栗コレクション1984・1985-revival-展)


Okada Museum of Art (岡田美術館)

2. August 2017

The reunification of three masterpieces by Utamaro Kitagawa

Okada Museum of Art

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

It does not happen every day that one receives an exclusive invitation to the opening of a new exhibition at a notable museum. However, all those who belong the the eager readers of this website are somehow “used to” reading about such events. After all, the “Museums & Exhibitions“-section the “Navigate by Topic“-navigation of this website shows quite a number of such events and placea, like those related to the Teien Art Museum, the Toguri Museum of Art and the Yamatane Museum of Art.

Fukagawa no yuki<br /> 喜多川歌麿「深川の雪」江戸時代 享和2~文化3年(1802-06)頃 岡田美術館蔵)<br /> Shinagawa no tsuki<br /> (原寸大高精細複製画) 喜多川歌麿「品川の月」原本:江戸時代 天明8年(1788)頃 フリーア美術館蔵)<br /> Yoshiwara no hana<br /> 喜多川歌麿「吉原の花」江戸時代 寛政3~4年(1791-1792)頃 ワズワース・アセーニアム美術館蔵)

Shinagawa no tsuki (原寸大高精細複製画) 喜多川歌麿「品川の月」
原本:江戸時代 天明8年 (1788)頃 フリーア美術館蔵)
Yoshiwara no hana (喜多川歌麿「吉原の花」
江戸時代 寛政3~4年 (1791-1792)頃
ワズワース・アセーニアム美術館蔵)
Fukagawa no yuki (喜多川歌麿「深川の雪」
江戸時代 享和2~文化3年 (1802-06)頃
岡田美術館蔵)

On 27 July 2017 I had the opportunity to be present as a very special event, when the Okada Museum of Art (岡田美術館 / おかだびじゅつかん) showcased the triptych “setsugekka” (雪月花 / せつげっか), the probably most distingished masterpieces by Utamaro Kitagawa ( 喜多川歌麿 / きたがわうたまろ) (ca. 1753 – 1806), in a special exhibition. It was the first time since 1879 that these three paintings are being jointly presented to the public in Japan. We are talking about the following three grand works of art (please click the photos below to open them in a separate window and to enjoy more detail):

Shinagawa in the Moonlight (品川の月 / しながわのつき)
Painted about 1788
Dimensions: 147 x 319 cm
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C., USA

Shinagawa in the Moonlight (原寸大高精細複製画) 喜多川歌麿「品川の月」原本:江戸時代 天明8年(1788)頃 フリーア美術館蔵)

Cherry Blossoms in Yoshiwara (吉原の花 / よしわらのはな)
Painted about 1791 – 1792
Dimensions: 186,7 x 256,9 cm
Wadsworth Athenum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection Fund

Cherry Blossoms in Yoshiwara (喜多川歌麿「吉原の花」江戸時代 寛政3~4年(1791-1792)頃 ワズワース・アセーニアム美術館蔵)

Fukagawa in the Snow (深川の雪 / ふかがわのゆき)
Painted about 1802 – 1806
Dimensions: 198,8 x 341,1 cm
Okada Museum of Art

Fukagawa in the Snow (喜多川歌麿「深川の雪」江戸時代 享和2~文化3年(1802-06)頃 岡田美術館蔵)

A group of about 100 representatives of the press, media and the tourist industry were welcomed by the director of the Okada Museum of Art, Mr. Tadashi Kobayashi (小林忠 / こばやしただし). Mr. Kobayashi is not only a recognised art historian, but also the president of the “Internation Ukio-e Society” and the author of quite a number of books on art and its history.

Tochigi (栃木 / とちぎ), the place where the three masterpieces were created, was represented by Mr. Toshimi Suzuki (鈴木俊美 / すずきとしみ), the mayor of the City of Toshigi, who also addressed the invited media- and tourist representatives.

The Artist: Utamaro Kitagawa (喜多川歌麿)

Utamaro Kitagawa is probably best known for his colourful woodblock prints. And among those, his pictures of beautiful women, created in the 90s of the 18th century, are certainly the most famous ones, even in our days. His pictures distinguish themselves from others of his time by displaying an unusual amount of emotions. However, the liberality and nudity of some of his pictures, for which he may be even more famous now, may not have shocked Utamaro Kitagawa’s contemporaries. The more negative labeling of pornography was something only Puritan visitors from the west attributed to his work, when they discovered it more than 50 years after the artist’s death.

Nevertheless, Utamaro Kitagawa and his work did come in conflict with the strict art rules of the Kansei reforms (1787 – 1793) when he dared to reproduce historical figures too clearly in his pictures. His imprisonment in 1804 represents one of the most infamous cases of censorship.

You may find yourself reminded on paintings by early French impressionists, when you see Utamaro Kitagawa’s pictures.  And that should not come as a surprise: Hardly any other Japanese painter had such a comprehensive influence on their style.

Probably a little less known: It was an art collector and -dealer of German origin, who – almost 100 years after Utamaro Kitagawa – essentially promoted knowledge on East Asian art to the West (mainly the Americas and Europe): Siegfried Bing (26 February 1838 – 9 June 1905).

But let’s have a closer look at those extraordinary pieces of Japanese art of painting…

The Works of Art in Detail

Shinagawa in the Moonlight (品川の月 / しながわのつき)

The first (i.e. oldest) work of art in this collection is a bit out of the ordinary, becauses its owner, the Freer Gallery of Art, as a matter of principle, does not loan any of its exhibits to other museums (and also does not accept loans by other museums). In order to show the three masterpieces in Japan, there was no other choice but to intricately procude a full-scale replica of the work. The original can be seen at the Freer Gallery of Art (there, however, in a frame).

The scene is in the second-story reception room of the famous restaurant and geisha house in Shinagawa, known as Dozō Sagami (土蔵相模 / どぞうさがみ) for its unusual architecture, looks almost like a stage setting. There are 19 women in the scene, and – if you look closely – you will also discover the shadow of a man on one of the paper walls. There can be no doubt: This is an evening of pleasures and enjoyment.

Cherry Blossoms in Yoshiwara (吉原の花 / よしわらのはな)

On this second painting you can find – all together – 52 women and children, going to and fro the tea houses that line the main street in the Yoshiwara pleasure quarters (the only ones approved by the government on the old days of Edo). The splendid garments of the courtesans vie with the beauty of the cherry blossoms in full bloom. In a second story room a group of samurai class women enjoy food and drink along with music and “flower hat dance” (花笠踊 / はながさおどり).

And there is another detail, the connoisseur may appreciate: In the tokonoma on the second floor (behind the musicians) a rather famous painting is depicted. It is the “Hotei with Chinese Children” by the popular Edo painter Itchō Hanabusa (英一蝶 / はなぶいっちょう) (1652 – 1724).

This second painting appears to be a satirical work poking fun at the sumptuary laws of the Kansei Reforms (寛政の改革 / かんせいのかいかく) of its days.

Fukagawa in the Snow (深川の雪 / ふかがわのゆき)

Here you can view the second story reception room of a large restaurant in Fukagawa, Edo’s premier geisha quarters. While some women in the scene are occupied with the preparation and distribution of food, the room is dominated by local geisha, known as tatsumi geisha (辰巳芸者 / たつみげいしゃ) in their gorgeous kimono. Have a closer look, and you will also find a child playing with a cat.

The trees in the inner courtyard are covered with snow. Utamaro Kitagawa presents a rich variety of genre scenes, from people looking out at the show to those gathered around a brazier escaping the cold to those immersed in a hand gesture game and another devoted to applying her makeup.
This painting was deemed to be lost for more than 60 years (rediscovered in February 2012). And only after cautious inspection and restoration it was to be seen again at the Okada Museum of Art in 2014.

There is one thing all three paintings have in common – in line with one of Utamaro Kitagawa’s own traditions – that also those scenes which would typically require the presence of men (it was men in the first place, who visited geisha houses for their entertainment), are being portayed by females only. If you know a little about the history of old Edo, you can tell from the attire of the persons in the pictures (by the way, it’s all together 99 persons), but also from kind of food that is being served, where the scene is being set. For example, the rather humble sole that is being served in Fukagawa, compared with the posh bream of Yoshiwara..

As the Japanese word “setsugekka” or “setsu getsu ka” (雪月花 / せつげっか) respectively suggests, the paintings are in line with a seasonal accord:
– “setsu” (雪 / せつ) = snow, i.e. winter
– “getsu” (月 / げつ) = moon, i.e. autumn
– “ka” (花 / か) = flower, i.e. spring
Obviously the sometimes extremely hot Japanese summer is – even for Japanese – so unbearable, that they just skip it (despite the fact that one very often is given the impression, that Japanese regard the joy and splendour of four seasons as something particular to their home country).

All three paintings were created in Tochigi (栃木 / とちぎ). And it was also there that they were exhibited together last in Japan in 1879. After that, their journey began, first to France (I have mentioned already the undeniable impact Utamaro Kitagawa’s oeuvre had on French impressionists), and finally the three paintings found their home in three collections stated above.

The Okada Museum of Art (岡田美術館)

In autumn 2013 this grand museum with its exquisit treasures and collections of Asian art was opened on the grounds of the former Kaikatei Hotel (開化亭ホテル / かいかていほてる) in Kowakudani (小涌谷 / こわくだに) in the Hakone region.

On a total building area of 7,700 sqm the museum offers state-of-the art exhibition rooms of a total floor space of about 5,000 sqm. This rather generous building houses mainly Japanese, Chinese and Korean works of art from ancient times to the present, collected by the business man Kazuo Okada (岡田和生) (according to the Forbes list one of the riches men in the world – having made his fortune with pachinko- and slot machines as well as casions).

The museum’s buildings are surrounded by beautiful gardens of about 15,000 sqm.

Of course, there is more to see at the Okada Museum of Art than those three gorgeous witnesses of old days – which will, by the way, only be on joint display until 29 October 2017 (don’t miss to see them side by side – a chance like this won’t come along anytime soon!) – but also rather impressive collections of fince porcelain, sculptures, scroll- and folding pictures from China, Korea and Japan. However, during the course of the press reception on 27 July 2017, these could only briefly be visited due to time constraints. Here are a few examples:

The Chocolate for the Exhibition

Okada Museum Chocolate by Naoki Miura

So to speak “suitable for the exhibition” the Japanese confiseur Naoki Miura (三浦直樹 / みうらなおき) created a collection of fine chocolate that treats the palate with eight different aroma combinations (tasting bits from left to right):

Okada Museum Chocolate by Naoki Miura

  1. gorgonzola / bacon
  2. purple potato / black sesame
  3. almond milk / dry apricot
  4. cream cheese / “berry rose”
  5. Japanese maron / matsutake (mushroom)
  6. pistachio / cinnamon
  7. white truffle / pumpkin
  8. yuzu / fresh basil

Those pralines, decorated with motives of the exhibition are being sold in sets of eight (4,800 Yen):

Relaxation for the feet, exhausted from the museum’s visit

Besides the gardens surrounding the museum, the fancy but cosy foot bath in black granite next to the entrance area of the main exhibition all, is quite an eye-catcher. The area of Hakone is particularly rich in natural hot spings. And here the thermal water will be soothing your worn-out feet at comfortable 40°C – while you can enjoy the view of Kotaro Fukui’s gigantic (12 x 30 metres) painting of the god of wind and the god of thunderstorm that is covering the complete main facade of the building (have a look at the picture at the top of this posting).

Okada Museum of Art

How to get there:

The most comfortable way to Hakone Yumoto (箱根湯本 / はこねゆもと) is taking the express trains “Romancecar” of the Odakyū line (小田急線 / おだきゅうせん) (they commute between Shinjuku and Hakone Yumoto). Travel time: about 90 minutes.
Should you wish to save a little money, and if time is not your prime issue, you may want to use the local and “normal” express trains of the Odakyū line.
If Japan Rail is your prime choice, go to Odawara station (小田原駅 / おだわらえき) which is also a shinkansen stop.

From Hakone Yumoto or Odawara respectively the Izu Hakone Bus brings right in front of the museum (bus-stop “Kowakien”) (about 20 minutes of travel time from Hakone Yumoto).

Opening hours:

Daily from 9 am to 5 pm (last entry: 4:30 pm).
(The museum may be closed occasionally during exhibition changes.)

Admission fees:

Adults and university students: 2,800 Yen
School studens (from elementary school): 1,800 Yen

There are discounts for groups of 10 and more people, disabled people and accomanying persons.
Parking lots and the foot washing are free of charge for visitors of the museum.

Visitors who wish to use the gardens and the foot washing only, may also use the museum’s parking lots – they will be charged 500 Yen after the first hour for every hour.

Admision fee for the garden: 300 Yen
Fee for the foot washing facilities: 500 Yen

Please observe that mobile phones, cameras and other recording devices of any kind may not be brought into the exhibition halls (lockers are available, free of charge).

One final word:

All photographs seen in this posting were taken with the Okada Museum of Art’s explicit and kind permission.

I wrote the name of the great artist Utamaro Kitagawa in the “Western” way: given name, family name. Usually, Utamaro Kitagawa is being referred to as simply “Utamaro”. But I didn’t want to be so presumptuous as to pretent I was on first name terms with the artist….


Okada Kunstmuseum (岡田美術館)

1. August 2017

Die Wiedervereinigung dreier Meisterwerke Utamaro Kitagawas

Okada Museum of Art

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Es passiert sicher nicht alle Tage, dass man von einem namhaften Museum zu einem exklusiven Besuch eingeladen wird. Wenn Sie zu den fleißigen Lesern dieser Webseite gehören, wundern Sie sich allerdings wohl weniger darüber – Einladungen dieser Art haben schließlich schon zu ausführlichen Berichten über z.B. das Teien Kunstmuseum, das Toguri Kunstmuseum und das Yamatane Kunstmuseum geführt (wie ein Blick in die Auswahl “Museen & Ausstellungen” in der Themen-Navigation dieser Webseite verrät).

Fukagawa no yuki<br /> 喜多川歌麿「深川の雪」江戸時代 享和2~文化3年(1802-06)頃 岡田美術館蔵)<br /> Shinagawa no tsuki<br /> (原寸大高精細複製画) 喜多川歌麿「品川の月」原本:江戸時代 天明8年(1788)頃 フリーア美術館蔵)<br /> Yoshiwara no hana<br /> 喜多川歌麿「吉原の花」江戸時代 寛政3~4年(1791-1792)頃 ワズワース・アセーニアム美術館蔵)

Shinagawa no tsuki (原寸大高精細複製画) 喜多川歌麿「品川の月」
原本:江戸時代 天明8年 (1788)頃 フリーア美術館蔵)
Yoshiwara no hana (喜多川歌麿「吉原の花」
江戸時代 寛政3~4年 (1791-1792)頃
ワズワース・アセーニアム美術館蔵)
Fukagawa no yuki (喜多川歌麿「深川の雪」
江戸時代 享和2~文化3年 (1802-06)頃
岡田美術館蔵)

Am 27. Juli 2017 hatte ich die Chance, einem ganz besonderen Event beizuwohnen, als das Okada Kunstmuseum (岡田美術館 / おかだびじゅつかん) das Triptychon „Setsugekka“ (雪月花 / せつげっか), die vielleicht herausragendsten Meisterwerke von Utamaro Kitagawa ( 喜多川歌麿 / きたがわうたまろ) (ca. 1753 – 1806) in einer Sonderausstellung der Öffentlichkeit präsentierte. Zum ersten Mal seit 1879 wird diese dreiteilige Gemäldeserie wieder gemeinsam dem interessierten Publikum zugänglich gemacht. Es handelt sich um folgende drei Kolossal-Gemälde (bitte klicken Sie die Fotos an, um sie in einem separaten Fenster in voller Auflösung zu betrachten):

Der Mond von Shinagawa (品川の月 / しながわのつき)
Entstanden etwa 1788
Abmessungen: 147 x 319 cm
Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C., USA

Shinagawa in the Moonlight (原寸大高精細複製画) 喜多川歌麿「品川の月」原本:江戸時代 天明8年(1788)頃 フリーア美術館蔵)

Kirschblüten in Yoshiwara (吉原の花 / よしわらのはな)
Entstanden ca. 1791-1792
Abmessungen: 186,7 x 256,9 cm
Wadsworth Athenum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut, USA
The Ella Gallup Sumner and Mary Catlin Sumner Collection Fund

Cherry Blossoms in Yoshiwara (喜多川歌麿「吉原の花」江戸時代 寛政3~4年(1791-1792)頃 ワズワース・アセーニアム美術館蔵)

Fukagawa im Schnee (深川の雪 / ふかがわのゆき)
Entstanden ca. 1802-1806
Abmessungen: 198,8 x 341,1 cm
Okada Museum of Art

Fukagawa in the Snow (喜多川歌麿「深川の雪」江戸時代 享和2~文化3年(1802-06)頃 岡田美術館蔵)

Eine etwa 100-köpfige Gruppe, bestehend aus Presse- und Tourismusvertretern, wurde vom Direktor des Okada Kunstmuseums, Herrn Tadashi Kobayashi (小林忠 / こばやしただし), persönlich willkommen geheißen. Herr Kobayashi ist nicht nur anerkannter Kunsthistoriker, sondern auch Präsident der „Internationalen Ukiyo-e Gesellschaft“ und Autor zahlreicher Fachbücher.

Und als Vertreter Tochigis (栃木 / とちぎ), des Entstehungsortes der drei Meisterwerke, richtete Herr Toshimi Suzuki (鈴木俊美 / すずきとしみ), der Bürgermeister der Stadt Tochigi, ein Grußwort an die Anwesenden.

Der Künstler: Utamaro Kitagawa (喜多川歌麿)

Utamaro Kitagawa war in erster Linie für seine farbigen Holzschnitt-Drucke bekannt. Und unter diesen sind seine typischen Bilder schöner Frauen aus den 90er Jahren des 18. Jahrhunderts heute noch berühmt. Seine emotionsgeladenen Bilder waren zu seiner Zeit außergewöhnlich. Allerdings wird deren Freizügigkeit zu seinen Lebzeiten weniger “Aufsehen” erregt haben, als später bei den westlichen Besuchern Japans – erst diese brachten sie mit eher negativ belegten Konzepten von Pornografie in Verbindung. Allerdings kamen Utamaro Kitagawa und sein Werk mit den strikten Kunstvorschriften der Kansei-Reformen (1787 – 1793) in Konflikt, als er sich erdreistete, historische Figuren zu deutlich erkennbar in seinen Bildern wiederzugeben. Seine Inhaftierung im Jahre 1804 stellt einen der berüchtigsten Fälle von Zensur dar.

Beim Betrachten der Bilder Utamaro Kitagawas wird man nicht selten an die frühen französischen Impressionisten erinnert. Und das kommt nicht von Ungefähr: Kaum ein japanischer Maler hatte so umfassenden Einfluss auf deren Stil.

Verwunderlicher vielleicht schon, dass es ein deutschstämmiger Kunstsammler und -händler war, der fast 100 Jahre nach Utamaro Kitagawa entscheidend dazu beigetragen hat, dass das westliche Ausland (namentlich Europa und die USA) mit ostasiatischer Kunst vertraut gemacht wurde: Siegfried Bing (26.2.1838 – 9.6.1905).

Schauen wir uns diese außergewöhnlichen Meisterwerke japanischer Malkunst etwas genauer an…

Die Kunstwerke im Detail

Der Mond von Shinagawa (品川の月 / しながわのつき)

Das erste (sprich: älteste) Werk dieser Sammlung fällt in der Ausstellung ein bisschen aus dem Rahmen, denn da die Freer Gallery of Art keines der Kunstwerke seiner Sammlungen verleiht (aber auch keine Leihgaben aufnimmt), konnte die „Dreisamkeit“ der Bilder in Japan nur durch die Anfertigung einer originalgetreuen Kopie hergestellt werden. Das Original ist in gerahmter Form in der Freer Gallery of Art zu sehen.
Auf dem Bild ist der Empfangsraum im 1. Stock eines berühmten Restaurants und Geisha-Hauses in Shinagawa zu sehen, das für seine ungewöhnliche Architektur bekannt war und Dozō Sagami (土蔵相模 / どぞうさがみ) genannt wurde. Die dargestellte, bühnenähnliche Szene zeigt 19 Frauen – und wer etwas genauer hinschaut, entdeckt auch die Silhouette eines rauchenden Mannes hinter einer Papierwand. Man erkennt auf den ersten Blick, dass die auf dem Bild Versammelten sich dem Genuss abendlicher Vergnügen hingeben.

Kirschblüten in Yoshiwara (吉原の花 / よしわらのはな)

Auf dem zweiten Bild sind insgesamt 52 Frauen und Kinder dargestellt, die sich auf der „Hauptstraße“ des alten Vergnügungsviertels Yoshiwara (dem einzigen amtlich lizenzierten Vergnügungsviertel im alten Edo) an und in einem Teehaus der Kirschblüte erfreuen. Die „Kurtisanen“ konkurrieren mit der Pracht der Kirschblüte durch ihre prächtigen Roben. Im Obergeschoss des Teehauses sind Damen aus der Samurai-Kaste zu sehen, die sich mit Musik und „Blumenhut-Tanz“ (花笠踊 / はながさおどり) unterhalten und dabei bewirten lassen. Dass hier eine Szene am Abend dargestellt wird, ist an den ebenfalls abgebildeten Lampions und Stehlampen zu erkennen.
Ein weiteres Detail, das den Kenner aufmerksam werden lässt: In der Tokonoma im 1. Obergeschoss des Hauses (hinter den Musikerinnen) ist das Gemälde des Künstlers Itchō Hanabusa (英一蝶 / はなぶいっちょう) (1652 – 1724) “Hotei mit chinesischen Kindern” zu sehen.
Dieses zweite Gemälde des Triptychons kann auch als Satire auf die „Gesetze gegen übertriebenen Luxus“ der Kansei Reformen (寛政の改革 / かんせいのかいかく) dieser Zeit aufgefasst werden.

Fukagawa im Schnee (深川の雪 / ふかがわのゆき)

Hier können wir einen Blick ins Obergeschoss eines Geisha-Hauses in einem der wichtigsten Geisha-Bezirke des alten Edo, Fukagawa, werfen. Während einige Frauen mit der Zubereitung und Verteilung von Speisen beschäftigt sind, beherrschen die Tatsumi Geisha (辰巳芸者 / たつみげいしゃ) mit ihren prächtigen Kimono die Szene. Schauen Sie genauer hin, und Sie werden auch ein Kind finden, das mit einer Katze spielt.
Die Bäume im Atrium des Hauses sind schneebedeckt. Utamaro Kitagawa zeigt hier die unterschiedlichsten Szenen: Geisha, die die Schneelandschaft im Garten betrachten, solche, die der Kälte der Jahreszeit entfliehen, indem sie sich um ein Kohlenbecken versammeln; eine andere Gruppe, die sich einem Handgestenspiel hingibt und schließlich eine Geisha, die mit dem Auftragen von Make-up beschäftigt ist.
Dieses Gemälde hatte für mehr als 60 Jahren als verschollen gegolten (wiederentdeckt im Februar 2012) und war 2014 nach behutsamen Untersuchungen und Restaurationen erstmals wieder im Okada Kunstmuseum zu sehen gewesen.

Gemeinsam ist allen drei Bildern – in guter Tradition Utamaro Kitagawas – dass auch in den Szenen, in denen üblicherweise Männer auftreten müssten (es waren ja in erster Linie Männer, die zur Unterhaltung durch Musik und Tanz die Teehäuser besuchten), Frauen abgebildet sind. Wer sich in der Geschichte des alten Edo etwas auskennt, kann z.B. an den abgebildeten Personen (alle drei Bilder zeigen übrigens zusammen 99 Personen), ja selbst an den dargereichten Speisen den Ort der Handlung „ablesen“. Als Beispiel sei hier genannt, die vergleichsweise einfache Scholle, die in Fukagawa gereicht wurde – verglichen mit der deutlich luxuriöseren Meerbrasse in Yoshiwara.

Wie der japanische Begriff „setsugekka“ bzw. „setsu getsu ka“ (雪月花 / せつげっか) schon suggeriert, decken die Gemälde einen jahreszeitlichen Rhythmus ab:
– „Setsu“ (雪 / せつ) = Schnee, sprich: Winter
– „Getsu“ (月 / げつ) = Mond, sprich: Herbst
– „Ka“ (花 / か) = Blumen, sprich: Frühling
Offensichtlich lässt sich daraus ablesen, dass selbst Japanern ihr bisweilen unerträglich heißer Sommer so unangenehm ist, dass sie ihn bei aller Faszination für die vier Jahreszeiten (in Japan gewinnt man oft den Eindruck, als sei es das einzige Land auf Erden, das dergleichen kenne) aussparen.

Alle drei Bilder wurden im japanischen Tochigi (栃木 / とちぎ) gemalt. Und es war auch dort, dass sie 1879 letztmals gemeinsam ausgestellt wurden. Von dort ging die Reise der Bilder nach Frankreich (Utamaro Kitagawas Einfluss auf die Kunst der französischen Impressionisten gilt – wie bereits erwähnt – als besonders nachhaltig) führte. Und schließlich landeten die drei Teile des großen Werks bei den drei obengenannten Museen.

Das Okada Kunstmuseum (岡田美術館)

Im Herbst 2013 wurde dieses große Museum mit vielen exquisiten östlichen Schätzen und Sammlungen auf dem Gelände des ehemaligen Kaikatei Hotels (開化亭ホテル / かいかていほてる) in Kowakudani (小涌谷 / こわくだに) in der Hakone-Region eröffnet.
Mit einer Gesamtfläche von ca. 7.700 qm verfügt das Museum über beeindruckende Ausstellungsräume mit insgesamt von rund 5.000 qm. Dieses großzügige Gebäude zeigt hauptsächlich japanische, chinesische und koreanische Kunstwerke von der Antike bis zur Gegenwart, die von dem Geschäftsmann Kazuo Okada (岡田和生) (einem der reichsten Männer dieser Welt – er hat sein Vermögen übrigens mit Pachinko- und Glücksspielautomaten sowie Spielkasions gemacht) gesammelt wurden.
Die das Museum umgebenden Gärten erstrecken sich auf einem Areal von 15.000 qm.

Natürlich bestehen die Galerien des Okada Kunstmuseums nicht nur aus diesen drei prächtigen Zeugnissen alter Tage – diese werden übrigens nur noch bis zum 29. Oktober 2017 dort traulich vereint zu sehen sein (verpassen Sie die Chance nicht, diese drei Meisterwerke Seite an Seite betrachten zu können; sie kommt so schnell nicht wieder!) – sondern auch eine beachtliche Sammlung feinen Porzellans, chinesischer, koreanischer und japanischer Skulpturen, Roll- und Wandschirmbilder. Diese konnten allerdings aufgrund zeitlicher Einschränkungen während des Presseempfangs am 27. Juli 2017 nur am Rande in Augenschein genommen werden. Hier ein paar wenige Beispiele:

Die Schokolade zur Ausstellung

Okada Museum Chocolate by Naoki Miura

Sozusagen „passend zur Ausstellung“ hat der japanische Confisier Naoki Miura (三浦直樹 / みうらなおき) eine Schokoladenkollektion kreiert, die den Gaumen mit acht verschiedenen Aroma-Kombinationen verwöhnt (Verkostungs-Stücke von links nach rechts):

Okada Museum Chocolate by Naoki Miura

  1. Gorgonzola / Speck
  2. violette Süßkartoffel / schwarzer Sesam
  3. Mandelmilch / getrocknete Aprikose
  4. Frischkäse / „Berry Rose“
  5. japanische Marone / Matsutake
  6. Pistazie / Zimt
  7. weißer Trüffel / Kürbis
  8. Yuzu / frisches Basilikum

Die mit Motiven der Ausstellung versehenen Pralinés werden im schmucken 8er-Set angeboten (4.800 Yen):

Entspannung für die vom Museumsbesuch erlahmten Füße

Neben ausgedehnten Gartenanlagen, ist einer der Blickfänge die im Eingangsbereich des hochmodernen Museumskomplexes befindliche, schicke Fußwasch-Anlage in schwarzem Granit. Hakone ist reich an natürlichen Thermalquellen. Und das hier vorhandene Wasser sprudelt mit ca. 40°C in diese bequeme Anlage mit Blick auf das 12 x 30 Meter große Gemälde Kotaro Fukuis (auf dem ersten Bild dieses Artikels zu sehen), das den Wind- und den Donnergott darstellt und die gesamte Fassade des Hauptgebäudes einnimmt.

Okada Museum of Art

Wie man hinkommt:

Am bequemsten erreicht man den Bahnhof von Hakone Yumoto (箱根湯本 / はこねゆもと) mit den Expresszügen „Romancecar“ der Odakyū-Linie (小田急線 / おだきゅうせん) (diese verkehren zwischen Shinjuku und Hakone Yumoto). Fahrzeit ca. 90 Minuten.
Wer etwas Geld sparen möchte und wem es nicht so auf die Zeit ankommt, nimmt die lokalen und Schnellzüge der Odakyū-Linie.
Wer mit den Bahnen von Japan Rail anreisen möchte, steigt am Bahnhof Odawara (小田原駅 / おだわらえき), der auch Shinkansen-Haltestelle ist, aus.

Von Hakone Yumoto bzw. Odawara fährt der Izu Hakone Bus direkt bis vor das Museum (Bushaltestelle Kowakien) (ca. 20 Minuten Fahrzeit von Hakone Yumoto).

Öffnungszeiten:

Täglich geöffnet von 9 Uhr bis 17 Uhr (letzter Einlass: 16.30 Uhr).
(Das Museum wird gelegentlich für Ausstellungswechsel geschlossen.)

Eintrittsgelder:

Erwachsene und Studenten: 2.800 Yen
Schüler (ab Grundschule): 1.800 Yen

Nachlässe für Gruppen von 10 und mehr Personen, Behinderte und Begleitpersonen.
Parkplätze und die Fußwasch-Einrichtung können von Museumsbesuchern gratis benutzt werden.

Besucher, die nur den Garten oder die Fußwascheinrichtung nutzen wollen, zahlen für den Parkplatz nach einer Stunde 500 Yen pro Stunde.

Eintrittsgeld für den Garten: 300 Yen
Nutzung der Fußwasch-Anlage: 500 Yen

Bitte beachten Sie, dass Mobiltelefone, Kameras und Aufzeichnungsgeräte jedweder Art nicht mit in die Ausstellungsräume genommen werden dürfen (Gratisschließfächer sind vorhanden).

Schlussbemerkung:

Die Fotografien der Ausstellungsstücke durfte ich mit freundlicher Genehmigung des Okada Kunstmuseums anfertigen.

Bei der Schreibung des Namens des großen Künstlers Utamaro Kitagawa habe ich die “deutsche” Schreibweise gewählt: Vorname, Nachname. Auch wenn man bei Utamaro Kitagawa gemeinhin von “Utamaro” spricht und schreibt, wollte ich mir nicht anmaßen, den Anschein zu erwecken, mit ihm auf “Du & Du” gestanden zu haben.


Hinweis: Neue Ausstellung im Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館)

22. April 2017

Eine Welt voller Blumen – von der Rimpa-Schule zu zeitgenössischer Kunst

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Vögel und Blumen der vier Jahreszeiten, Farbe auf blattvergoldetem Papier, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Aufmerksame Leser meiner Artikel erinnern sich vielleicht an eine großartige Ausstellung, über die zu berichten ich im Oktober vergangenen Jahres das Vergnügen hatte. Seinerzeit beging das Yamatane Kunstmuseum seinen 50. Gründungstag mit der Ausstellung:

“Die Zerstörung und Erschaffung von Nihonga – Hayami Gyoshū: Eine Retrospektive” (速水御舟の全貎 -日本画の破壊と創造)

Vom 22. April 2017 bis zum 18. Juni 2017 bietet das Museum eine weitere Ausstellung seiner einmaligen Sammlungen: Eine Welt voller Blumen – von der Rimpa-Schule zu zeitgenössischer Kunst.

Dank des Yamatane Kunstmuseums, bin ich in der Lage, Ihnen hier ein paar der Höhepunkte der Ausstellung im Detail vorzustellen (klicken Sie die in diesem Artikel veröffentlichten Bilder an, um sie zu vergrößern und die feinen Details zu genießen).

Diese Ausstellung widmet sich ganz der Faszination der Japaner für den Wechsel der Jahreszeiten – die hier ihren Ausdruck in einem bunten Reigen an Blüten, Blumen und den Segnungen der Natur findet. Sie führt den Besucher von der eleganten Welt der Blumen, wie sie Hōitsu Sakai so eindrucksvoll festgehalten hat, zur lebendigen Wiedergabe prächtiger Farben, die uns Kiitsu Suzuki beschert hat – auch nach Jahrhunderten vermögen es diese Kunstwerke aus der Rimpa-Schule, uns mit ihrem Farb- und Detailreichtum zu erstaunen.

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一) (1761 – 1828):
Der Mond und Pflaumenbäume, Farbe auf Seide, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一): Der Mond und Pflaumenbäume, Farbe auf Seide, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Ein roter Pflaumenbaum windet sich um die langen Zweige eines Pflaumenbaums mit weißen Blüten, während der Vollmond zwischen ihren oberen Zweigen durchscheint. Die Kombination von Mond und Pflaumenblüte war eines der beliebtesten Themen von Hōitsu. Mehrere solche Werke, basierend auf schwarzer Tusche (wie hier), aber auch andere Kompositionen sind bekannt. Um den Mond darzustellen, benutzte er eine besondere Technik, die sich Sotoguma-Tintenmalerei nennt. Hierbei wird die Goldfarbe (金泥 / きんでい) nicht benutzt, um die Fläche des Mondes selbst darzustellen, sondern seinen Hintergrund. Durch die sehr feine Anwendung der Goldfarbe wird deutlich, dass Hōitsus Anliegen es war, das Mondlicht als ein nur schwaches Leuchten darzustellen.

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一) (1761 – 1828):
Chrysanthemen mit Vogel, Farbe auf Seide, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一): Chrysanthemen mit Vogel, Farbe auf Seide, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Hōitsu war in seinen Sechzigern, als er eine Reihe von Gemälden mit Vögeln und Blumen für die zwölf Monate des Jahres schuf, die auf den Gedichten des berühmten Dichters der frühen Kamakura-Zeit, Fujiwara no Teika (藤原定家 / ふじわらのたいか), basierten. Kameda Ryōrai (亀田 綾瀬 / かめだ りょうらい), ein Gelehrter der chinesisch-konfuzianischer Klassiker, lieferte die Inschrift für eine Reihe dieser Gemälde, von denen das Yamatane Kunstmuseum zwei besitzt. Das September-Bild zeigt Chrysanthemen, ein Thema, das mit dem Chrysanthemen-Festival verbunden ist. Das Chrysanthemen-Fest ist eines der fünf saisonalen Feste, das am neunten Tag des neunten Monats nach dem alten Mondkalender begangen wird. Hier sind die Chrysanthemen mit einem Blauschwanz (Tarsiger Cyanurus) zu sehen, der seine weiße Brust zeigt.

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一) (1796–1858):
Pfingstrosen, Farbe auf Seide, Edo-Zeit, 1851, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Pfingstrosen, Farbe auf Seide, Edo-Zeit, 1851, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Dieses Gemälde zeigt drei Farben von Pfingstrosenblüten in all ihrer Pracht. Anders als im charakteristischen Rimpa-Stil mit seinen vereinfachten Blütenblättern und den mit Tarashikomi-Technik (溜し込み / たらしこみ) mehrfach übermalten Flächen der Stiele, sehen wir hier eine besonders sorgfältige Darstellung feiner Details, die an den Stil chinesischer Hofmalerei erinnert. Als eines der wenigen erhaltenen Werke Kiitsus, die mit einem Datum versehen sind, ist es von besonderem Wert.

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一) (1796–1858):
Vögel und Blumen der vier Jahreszeiten, Farbe auf blattvergoldetem Papier, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Vögel und Blumen der vier Jahreszeiten, Farbe auf blattvergoldetem Papier, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Vögel und Blumen der vier Jahreszeiten, Farbe auf blattvergoldetem Papier, Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Anstatt eines Baumes oder Ästen, sehen wir auf diesem Wandschrim (oben) Rapsblüten, Veilchen, Löwenzahn, Sonnenblumen, Winden und andere Frühlings- und Sommerblumen mit ein paar Hühnern und ihren Küken. Und untere Wandschirm zeigt ein reiches Bouquet von Chrysanthemen, Pimpernelle, Chinaschilf (Miscanthus sinensis), Geißblatt (Patrinia scabiosifolia), Narzissen und anderen Pflanzen, die mit Herbst und Winter im Zusammenhang stehen – hier mit ein paar Mandarin-Enten. Während das Thema die vier Jahreszeiten sind, hat Kiitsu Sommer- und Herbstpflanzen ausgewählt, die von Künstlern der Rimpa-Schule als Hauptelemente bevorzugt wurden. Die Verwendung blasser Tinte und der Tarashikomi-Technik (溜し込み / たらしこみ),  folgen dem Rimpa-Stil, wie er von Kōrin an Hōitsu und von diesem an Kiitsu weitergereicht wurde. Die lebendigen Farbkombinationen und die sehr detaillierte Darstellung der Vögel zeigen jedoch Kiitsus Gefühl für das Moderne – Klarheit und Detail sind wichtiger als Stimmung.

Chokunyū Tanomura (田能村直入), (1814–1907):
100 Blumen, Farbe auf Seide, Meiji-Zeit, 1869, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Chokunyū Tanomura (田能村直入): 100 Blumen, Farbe auf Seide, Meiji-Zeit, 1869, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Schauen Sie sich Chokunyū Tanomuras “100 Blumen” einmal etwas genauer an! Seine Hingabe für Details erinnert an Zeichnungen in bontanischen Lexika. Genießen Sie diesen Spaziergang durch die Blüten und Blumen eines Jahres!

Dieses grandiose Rollbild zeigt hundert saisonale Blumen und Gräser im Sesshi-Stil. Die Erläuterung am Ende der Bildrolle besagt: “Ich wurde gebeten, einhundert Blumen für den Feudalherrn zu malen, aber da ich eine ganze Reihe vergessen hatte, habe ich mich sorgfältig über die saisonalen Blumen und Gräser für diese Bildrolle schlau gemacht und füge unten ihre Namen an.” Die Technik ahmt die Blumen- und Vogelmalereien im Mokkotsu-Stil, einer Technik, in der Objekte ohne Linien gemalt werden, nach.

Taikan Yokoyama (横山大観) (1868-1958):
Berg-Kirschbäume, Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit, 1934, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Taikan Yokoyama (横山大観): Berg-Kirschbäume, Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit, 1934, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Kokei Kobayashi (小林古径) (1883-1957):
Vogel mit immergrüner Magnolie, Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit, 1935, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Kokei Kobayashi (小林古径): Vogel mit immergrüner Magnolie, Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit, 1935, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Togyū Okumura (奥村土牛) (1889-1990):
Kirschblüten am Daigo-ji, Farbe auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit, 1972, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Togyū Okumura (奥村土牛): Kirschblüten am Daigo-ji, Farbe auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit, 1972, Yamatane Kunstmuseum

Dieses Gemälde zeigt die Kirschblüten am Daigo-ji-Tempels in Kyōto, die durch das üppige Gelage, das Hideyoshi Toyotomi (豊臣秀吉 / とよとみひでよし) (1537-1598) dort zum Kirschblüten-Betrachten veranstaltet hat, Berühmtheit erlangt hat. Togyū besuchte den Daigo-ji am sechsten Jahrestag des Todes seines Lehrers Kokei Kobayashi (小林古径 / こばやしこけい) und war der Meinung, dass die Trauerkirsche dort von so ausnehmender Schönheit sei, dass er sie malen wollte. Für die nach vorne weisenden Blütenblätter verwendete er mehrere Schichten dünner Farbe um so das herrliche Blütenmeer des Kirschbaumes zu erzeugen. Dieses Werk, das Togyū schuf, als er 83 Jahre alt war, verbindet Eleganz mit Ruhe und Sanftmut.

Adresse des Museums:

Yamatane Museum of Art
3-12-36 Hiro-o, Shibuya-ku
Tōkyō 150-0012

₸150-0012
東京都渋谷区広尾3-12-36
山種美術館

http://www.yamatane-museum.jp

Öffnungzeiten des Museums:

Geöffnet täglich außer montags von 10 Uhr bis 17 Uhr (letzter Einlass um 16.30 Uhr)
Fällt ein Nationalfeiertag auf Montag, bleibt das Museum stattdessen am folgenden Werktag geschlossen.
Diese Ausstellung kann vom 22. April 2017 bis zum 18. Juni 2017 besucht werden.

Eintrittsgebühr:

Für die Ausstellung “Eine Welt voller Blumen – von der Rimpa-Schule zu zeitgenössischer Kunst” (A World of Flowers – from the Rimpa School to Contemporary Art):

Erwachsene: 1.000 [800] Yen
Oberschüler und Studenten: : 800 [700] Yen
Mittelschüler und Jüngere: freier Eintritt

*Die Beträge in Klammern beziehen sich auf Gruppen von 20 und mehr Personen, Eintrittskarten aus dem Vorverkauf und Besucher in Kimono.
*Inhaber von Behindertenausweisen und je eine Begleitperson: Eintritt frei.

Wie man hinkommt:

Nehmen Sie die Bahnen von Japan Rail (JR) oder der Tōkyō Metro Hibiya-Linie nach Ebisu (恵比寿 / えびす) und halten Sie sich von dort in östlicher Richtung, um zur Meiji Dōri (明治通り / めいじどおり) zu gelangen. Überqueren Sie die Meiji Dōri in nordöstlicher Richtung und folgen Sie der rechten Straßenseite einige hundert Meter (sie kommen dabei am “Ebisu Prime Square” und dem eindrucksvollen Gebäude der “Papas Company” vorbei).

Und weil wir alle ja zivilisierte Zeitgenossen und -innen sein möchten, hier gleich noch ein paar Regeln, die beim Besuch des Museums zu beachten sind:

  • Berühren Sie die Ausstellungsstücke und Schaukästen nicht.
  • Halten Sie jüngere Kinder an der Hand.
  • Seien sie ruhig in der Galerie.
  • Rennen Sie in der Galerie nicht  umher.
  • Keine Fotografie, keine Videoaufnahmen, kein Kopieren der Ausstellungsstücke.
  • Wenn Sie sich in der Ausstellung Notizen machen möchten, bitte nur mit Bleistift – keine anderen Schreibwerkzeuge (Federhalter, Kugelschreiber etc.).
  • Schalten Sie Ihr Mobiltelefon in der Ausstellung aus.
  • Essen und Trinken sind in der Ausstellung nicht gestattet (das schließt auch Wasser, Süßigkeiten und Kaugummis mit ein).
  • Im Museum gilt absolutes Rauchverbot.

Tip: New Exhibition at the Yamatane Museum of Art (山種美術館)

21. April 2017

A World of Flowers – from the Rimpa School to Contemporary Art

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Birds and Flowers of the Four Seasons, Color on Gold-Leafed Paper, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

A German version of this posting you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.

Attentive readers of my postings may remember a magnificent exhibition I had the pleasure of introducing in October last year that was shown on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the foundation of the Yamatane Museum of Art

The Destruction and Creation of Nihonga – Hayami Gyoshū: A Retrospective” (速水御舟の全貎 -日本画の破壊と創造)

From 22 April 2017 to 18 June 2017 the museum exhibits yet another wonderful selection of its own collection: A World of Flowers – from the Rimpa School to Contemporary Art.

Courtesy of the Yamatane Museum of Art, I am able to introduce to you some of the highlights of the exhibition (please click to enlarge to enjoy them in greater detail).

The exhibition is dedicated to the Japanese love for the changing seasons – represented by a bounty of blossoms, flowers and nature’s delights. From the elegant world of flowers, created by Hōitsu Sakai, to the vivid presentation of rich colours by Kiitsu Suzuki – even after centuries, these works of art of the Rimpa school still astonish us with their abundance of colour.

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一) (1761 – 1828):
The Moon and Plum Trees, Color on Silk, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一): The Moon and Plum Trees, Color on Silk, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

A red plum tree appears nestled among the long branches of a white plum, while the full moon seems to peek between their upper branches. The combination of the moon and plum trees was one of Hōitsu’s favorite subjects. Several such works, with sumi black as the underlying tone but varying compositions, are extant. To depict the moon, he used the sotoguma ink painting technique. The kindei (gold paint) is applied not to the moon itself but its exterior. The gold paint was, however, placed quite thinly, suggesting that Hōitsu was taking great pains over the faint moonlight.

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一) (1761 – 1828):
Chrysanthemums with Bird, Color on Silk, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

Hōitsu Sakai ( 酒井 抱一): Chrysanthemums with Bird, Color on Silk, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

Hōitsu was in his sixties, he created a series of bird-and-flower paintings for the twelve months of the year based on poems on that theme for each month by the Kamakura period poet Fujiwara no Teika. Multiple sets of paintings on the same theme have been confirmed. Kameda Ryōrai, a scholar of the Chinese classics, provided the inscription for one of series, and our museum owns 2 paintings of this set. Others in the series are in the Feinberg Collection and the Freer Gallery of Art in the United State, etc. The September painting, No. 13, depicts chrysanthemums, a subject associated with the Chrysanthemum Festival, one of the traditional five seasonal festivals, on the ninth day of the ninth lunar month, together with a red-flanked bluetail (Tarsiger cyanurus) perched on a chrysanthemum stalk and displaying its white breast.

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一) (1796–1858):
Peonies, Color on Silk, Edo Period, 1851, Yamatane Museum of Art

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Peonies, Color on Silk, Edo Period, 1851, Yamatane Museum of Art

This painting depicts three colors of peony blossoms in all their glory. Here, however, instead of a characteristically Rimpa style with simplified petals and the use of tarashikomi on the stems, we see a clear, careful depiction down to the fine details, suggesting the style of Chinese court painters. As one of the few extant works by Kiitsu inscribed with a date, this work is especially rare and valuable.

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一) (1796–1858):
Birds and Flowers of the Four Seasons, Color on Gold-Leafed Paper, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Birds and Flowers of the Four Seasons, Color on Gold-Leafed Paper, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

Kiitsu Suzuki (鈴木 其一): Birds and Flowers of the Four Seasons, Color on Gold-Leafed Paper, Edo Period, 19th Century, Yamatane Museum of Art

This painting includes not a single tree. Instead, on the right-hand screen we see rape blossoms, violets, dandelions, sunflowers, morning glories and other spring and summer flowers, with a couple of chickens and their chicks. The left-hand screen includes chrysanthemums, burnets, silver grass (Miscanthus sinensis), golden lace (Patrinia scabiosifolia), narcissus, and other plants associated with fall and winter, with a pair of mandarin ducks. While the subject is the four seasons, Kiitsu has chosen summer and autumn plants favored by Rimpa school artists as the main elements. The plump lines in pale ink and the use of the tarashikomi technique to render plants tenderly in pooled, blurred colors follow the Rimpa style, transmitted from Kōrin to Hōitsu and then to Kiitsu. The lively color combinations and the depiction of the birds down to the last detail, with skillful use of color, reveal, however, Kiitsu’s modern sensibility, with clarity having priority over sentiment.

Chokunyū Tanomura (田能村直入), (1814–1907):
A Hundred Flowers, Color on Silk, Meiji Period, 1869, Yamatane Museum of Art

Chokunyū Tanomura (田能村直入): A Hundred Flowers, Color on Silk, Meiji Period, 1869, Yamatane Museum of Art

This scroll painting depicts one hundred seasonal flowers and grasses in the sesshi (cut-branch) style. The annotation at the end of the scroll, which gives it the air of a botanical study, says, “I was asked to paint one hundred flowers for the feudal lord, but since I forgot to include quite a few, I have made a careful study of seasonal flowers and grasses for this scroll and included their names below.” The technique emulates the flower and bird paintings done in the realistic “boneless” style (mokkotsu), a technique in which objects are rendered without lines, of Qing dynasty China. Still, the rich coloring and teeming plant life express the character of Chokunyū’s work.

Taikan Yokoyama (横山大観) (1868-1958):
Mountain Cherry Trees, Color on Silk, Shōwa Period, 1934, Yamatane Museum of Art

Taikan Yokoyama (横山大観): Mountain Cherry Trees, Color on Silk, Shōwa Period, 1934, Yamatane Museum of Art

Kokei Kobayashi (小林古径) (1883-1957):
Bird and Evergreen Magnolia, Color on Silk, Shōwa Period, 1935, Yamatane Museum of Art

Kokei Kobayashi (小林古径): Bird and Evergreen Magnolia, Color on Silk, Shōwa Period, 1935, Yamatane Museum of Art

Togyū Okumura (奥村土牛) (1889-1990):
Cherry Blossoms at Daigo-ji Temple, Color on Paper, Shōwa Period, 1972, Yamatane Museum of Art

Togyū Okumura (奥村土牛): Cherry Blossoms at Daigo-ji Temple, Color on Paper, Shōwa Period, 1972, Yamatane Museum of Art

This painting depicts the cherry blossoms of Daigo-ji temple in Kyoto, famous as the spot at which Toyotomi Hideyoshi held a lavish cherry-blossom-viewing banquet. Togyū visited Daigo-ji on the sixth anniversary of the death of his teacher, Kobayashi Kokei and, feeling that its weeping cherry trees were extraordinarily beautiful, decided he wished to paint them. For the front-facing cherry blossoms’ petals, he carefully applied dozens of layers of dilute paint to produce a sense of the plump, pale pink flowers’ mass. This work, created when Togyū was 83, combines elegance, tranquility, and gentleness.

Address of the Museum:

Yamatane Museum of Art
3-12-36 Hiro-o, Shibuya-ku
Tōkyō 150-0012

₸150-0012
東京都渋谷区広尾3-12-36
山種美術館

http://www.yamatane-museum.jp

Opening hours of the Museum:

Open daily, except on Mondays (closed on the day after a national holiday) from 10:00 am to  5:00 pm (last admission at 4:30 pm).
The current exhibition is held from 22 April 2017 to 18 June 2017.

Admission fees:

For the exhibition “A World of Flowers – from the Rimpa School to Contemporary Art”

Adults: 1,000 [800] Yen
University and High School Students: 800 [700] Yen
Middle School and younger children: free of charge

*Figures in brackets are for groups of 20 or more, advance tickets, and those who are wearing kimono.
*Disability ID holders and one person accompanying them are admitted free of charge.

How to get there:

Take the lines of Japan Rail (JR) or the Tōkyō Metro Hibiya line to Ebisu (恵比寿 / えびす) and head in eastern direction towards the Meiji Dōri (明治通り / めいじどおり). Cross the Meiji Dōri in north-eastern direction and follow the right side of the street for some hundred metres (passing the “Ebisu Prime Square” and the impressive building of “Papas Company”).

And since you want to be a good citizen, here are some of the rules you want to adhere to, when you visit the Yamatane Museum of Art:

  • Do not touch the artworks and cases.
  • Hold the hand of young children.
  • Keep quite in the gallery.
  • Do not run in the gallery.
  • No photographing, video recording, or copying the artworks in the gallery.
  • When taking notes in the gallery, use pencils only – no pens, no ink.
  • Swith off your mobile phone in the gallery.
  • No eating or drinking in the gallery (that includes water, candy and chewing gums).
  • No smoking anywhere in the museum.

Tottori Folk Crafts Museum (鳥取民芸美術館)

5. March 2017

Have a look and be amazed – thanks to Shōya Yoshida

Tottori Mingei Bijutsukan (鳥取民芸美術館)

Tottori Mingei Bijutsukan (鳥取民芸美術館)

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

You don’t know Shōya Yoshida (吉田璋也 / よしだしょうや)? The term “folk crafts” doesn’t ring any bell? Well, with question marks like that on your minde you may not be in the best of companies, but you are just admitting to gaps in education that can easily and joyfully be closed by this little posting.

In order to really understand the Folk Crafts Museum of Tottori (鳥取民芸美術館 / とっとりみんげいびじゅつかん) and its more than 5,000 exhibits which is going to be introduced here, you need to know a bit about its “founding father”, Shōya Yoshida.

Yoshida, who was born on 17th January 1898 in the city of Tottori, the capital of the prefecture (he died on 13th September 1972), was a physician. In Japan he is regarded as one of the key figures when it comes to the “Folk Crafts” movement (民芸運動 / みんげいうんどう), that was developed in the late 20s and early 30s of the 20th century by Sōetsu (Muneyoshi) Yanagi (柳宗悦 / やなぎむねよし). The aim of this movement was to make the poeple aware of the beauty of traditional articles of daily use and to appreciate them beyond the prevailling taste of the time. Yanagi’s slogan was: objects created by average people rise above the criteria of “beauty” and “uglyness”.

The basic philosophy of the folk crafts movement is not entirely without a touch of a bad after taste, as it also encompasses also some nationalistic undertones that can neither be denied nor just explained with the main stream conception of society and history of its time.

Albeit, Shōya Yoshida is – among other things – still renowned in our days for his breathtaking designs that are modern and timeless at the same time. Some potters are still cultivating them. Probably the most famous of his pottery designs is the “ushinotoyaki”-(牛ノ戸焼 / うしのとやき) that still has such a modern touch that you might think it was invented just yesterday. Yoshidas perception of beautiful dishes for daily use is still living on, e.g. in the pottery workshops of the “Inshū Nakaigama” (因州中井窯 / いんしゅうなかいがま) in Nakai Kawaramachi, Tottori. The workshop’s head, Mr. Akira Sakamoto (坂本章 / さかもとあきら) in managing the place already in the third generation. The workshop’s kiln was built in 1945 by Toshiro Sakamoto (坂本俊郎 / さかもととしひろ) and became Shōya Yoshida’s official production site in 1952.

Here are some impressions from the pottery workshop::

If the visit to the folk crafts museum has put you in the right mood for shopping, just turn next door and pay the “Takumi Craft Shop” (たくみ工芸店 / たくみこうぎてん) a visit. There you can also buy the ceramic craft works coming from Akira Sakamoto’s workshop.

Address of the Museum:

Tottori Folk Crafts Museum
651 Sakaemachi, Tottori-shi,
Tottori-ken 〒680-0831

〒680-0831
鳥取県鳥取市栄町651
鳥取民芸美術館

Opening hours of the Museum:

Daily (except on Wednesdays): 10 am to 5 pm
Closed during the New Year holidays and during the installation of new exhibitions.

Admission fee:

Adults: 500 Yen
University students: 300 Yen (student ID necessary)
Seniors from 70 years of age and pupils: frei

Opening hours of the Takumi Craft Shop:

Daily (except on Wednesdays): 10 am to 6 pm
Closed during the New Year holidays.

Address of the pottery workshop and kiln “Inshū Nakaigama” (因州中井窯)

Inshū Nakaigama
Nakai 243-5
Kawaramachi, Tottori-shi
Tottori-ken, 〒680-1224
http://nakaigama.jp

因州中井窯
〒680-1224鳥取県鳥取市河原町243-5
http://nakaigama.jp

Further information about interesting places and venues in Tottori you can find here:

Kurayoshi (倉吉)
– The town of white walls and red roofs

Kotoura-chō (琴浦町)
– Stucco plasterers of the world – watch out!

Tottori Sand Museum (砂の美術館)
-Travel Around the World in Sand

Tottori: Sand Dunes (鳥取砂丘)
– The Sahara, in the middle of Japan?

Tottori: Wakasa (鳥取・若桜)
– A gem, hidden in the mountains