The old Tōkaidō (旧東海道) (Engl.)

17. October 2020

A highway of the Edo period invites you to a trip down memory lane

A German version of this posting you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.

Der alte Tōkaidō (旧東海道)

The Old Tōkaidō (旧東海道) (please click to enlarge)

The Tōkaidō (東海道 / とうかいどう) is one of the few important roads in Japan whose names have been heard outside the country (mostly in connection with the “Tōkaidō” line of the bullet-train network (Shinkansen / 新幹線) of Japan Railways, which connects the cities of Tōkyō and Ōsaka). In general, however, this refers to the historic highway that in the Edo period (江戸時代 / えどじだい) (1603-1867) connected the old imperial city Kyōto (京都 / きょうと) with the headquarters of the Tokugawa Shōgunate (徳川幕府 / とくがわばくふ) in Edo (江戸 / えど). The street was much-sung about – and certainly even more often the subject of artistic contemplation (quite a few will be familiar with the colourful woodblock prints of the “53 Stations of Tōkaidō” (東海道五十三次 / とうかいどうごじゅうさんつぎ).
In reality, however, the roots of this important highway go back to a road system that was taken over from China in the early 8th century. The Tōkaidō gained greater significance only from the end of the 12th century, in the era of the Kamakura Shōgunate (鎌倉幕府 / かまくらばふく), which had its seat of government in Kamakura (about 50 km south of today’s Tōkyō, located at the shores of the Pacific Ocean). But of course, this road was certainly the most important one in the Edo period, when it was one of the prime ways to commute over a distance of 488 km between the two most important cities of the empire, Kyōto and Edo (today’s Tōkyō) (if one had obtained a permit for this – but that is an entirely different story that should not be elaborated here).

Today the Tōkaidō “lives on” mainly in sections of its old grandeur (which are used as normal roads, even as national roads) and in names.

So, don’t be surprised to also find a “Tōkaidō” in Tōkyō, the old Edo. It is called “Kyū Tōkaidō” (旧東海道 / きゅうとうかいどう), former Tōkaidō, because it is no longer used as a main road and “only” reminds us of the old times. It is particularly “hikable” from Kita Shinagawa (北品川 / きたしながわ) to the Shinagawa Aquarium (品川水族館 / しながわすいぞくかん) over a length of almost five kilometres. And in this secition it is not just a historic road, but also one that even today shows how important it must have been in the past. The road is lined with an almost uncountable number of temples and shrines. Attentive readers of this website already know one of them:

The Six Jizō Bosatsu of Edo (江戸六地蔵)
– A prilgim’s way to ancient copper Jizō sculptures across Tōkyō

The very first and oldest of the Jizō statues described in that article can be found at the Honsen Temple (品川寺 / ほんせんじ) – one of the remarkable Buddhist temples along the old Tōkaidō.

The street scene

But let us stroll along the old main road from north to south. Of course, the street scene today has nothing to do with what the eye saw in the old Edo days, but even today you can tell that the street used to be a busy one. Recent years have seen some investment in infrastructure, the road surface has been renewed, more space for pedestrians has been created, and apparently the retail trade has been encouraged to settle (or at least to persevere). Nevertheless, the big city is eating its way into this rather small-town section Tōkyō – gradually, larger and larger apartment buildings are being built.

The temples

Honkō-ji
(本光寺)

The origins of this temple are unknown. It is assumed that the Honkō-ji (本光寺 / ほんこうじ) received this name in 1382. During the Muromachi period (1336-1573) the temple was given to the Hokke sect of Japanese Buddhism. And it is said that the third of the Tokugawa Shōguns, Tokugawa Iemitsu (徳川家光 / とくがわいえみつ) visited the temple. Like so many other historical buildings of Tōkyō, the main hall of Honkō-ji was destroyed in the great earthquake of 1923 and rebuilt in 1926. When several schools (sects) of Japanese Buddhism merged, the temple joined the Nichiren sect in 1941, which it again left after World War II.

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

After it was destoyed again during World War II, the main hall was rebuilt in 1968. The pagoda that visually dominates the compound today dates from 1985.

Honei-ji
(本榮寺)

There isn’t much to report about the history of the Honei-ji (本榮寺 / ほんえいじ), except that it is said to have been founded in 1574.

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Tenmyōkoku-ji
(天妙国寺)

According to legend, the temple was built in 1285 by Tenmei (天目 / てんめい), a student of Nichiren (日蓮 / にちれん). From the end of the 16th century the temple was closely connected with the Tokugawa family (徳川 / とくがわ). A five-storey pagoda dating from the 15th century was destroyed by a storm in 1614, but renewed by the third Tokugawa Shōgun before being destroyed again in 1702 – this time by fire – and never rebuilt after that.

Tenmyōkoku-ji (天妙国寺), Sanmon (山門)

Tenmyōkoku-ji (天妙国寺), Sanmon (山門)

One usually enters the grounds of the Tenmyōkoku-ji (天妙国寺 / てんみょうこくじ) through the Sanmon (山門 / さんもん). This bright red main gate seems to be as “as good as new”, not only because it was only built in 1955, but also because it has certainly been painted several times since then. It belongs to the “one hundred scenic spots in Shinagawa” – and one almost feels tempted to say: Rightly so! Even the massive main hall, which was built in the middle of the 18th century, clearly stands out from the mass of small temples in the neighbourhood.

Shinryō-ji
(真了寺)

The Shinryō-ji (真了寺 / しんりょうじ) was founded in 1673 as a Nichiren temple. For more than 20 years it has been an animal cemetery – a niche in the market, which will certainly be profitable in Tōkyō – without any real service having to be rendered (for animals, of course, much less than for humans) – as people here are particularly inclined to humanise their pets. But for the visitor, the massive main gate with the two elephants is probably more impressive anyway.

Kaiun-ji
(海雲寺)

(one of the “one hundred scenic spots in Shinagawa”)

The Kaiun-ji (海雲寺 / かいうんじ) is also one of the 100 “scenic spots” of Shinagawa. That being the case, one might wonder, why the gardens of the temple in a rather untended state.
The origin of the temple is said to be a pagoda, which was built in 1251. Initially the temple belonged to the Rinzai sect of Japanese Buddhism, but in 1596 it was renamed to its present name and joined the Sōtō sect.

On the grounds of the temple there are several cultural assets, for example an eleven-headed Kannon, which is said to date from 1251 (the year the temple was built). The temple is also associated with the Christian Shimabara uprising of 1637, when the Nabeshima (Fujiwara sideline) worshipped here supported the Tokugawa Shōgunate (they had received the region of Saga, one of the richest domains in the country, from the Tokugawa). This uprising is of particular historical significance, as it was one of the main factors that led to the closure of Japan for over 200 years.

By the way, this temple is located in the immediate vicinity of the Honsen Temple (品川寺 / ほんせんじ) with its impressive Jizō statue.

The shrines

Ebara Jinja
(荏原神社)

In the far north, on the northern banks of the Meguro River (目黒川 / めぐろがわ), you will find the Ebara Jinja (荏原神社 / えばらじんじゃ). This ancient shrine dates back to a foundation in the year 709 – this is where the gods from the imperial city of Nara (奈良 / なら) (at that time still called Heijō-kyō 〈平城京 / へいじょうきょう〉) were worshipped, as well as the gods from the “eternal” imperial city Kyōto (京都 / きょうと) (at that time still called Heian-kyō 〈平安京 / へいあんきょう〉 or simply Miyako 〈京 or 都 / みやこ〉 , “imperial residence”).
During the Tokugawa Shōgunate (徳川幕府 / とくがわばくふ) (1603-1867) the shrine enjoyed the special support of the Tokugawa clan.

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

After the Meiji Emperor took over the government in 1868, the shrine even became an imperial site. The main building of the shrine is the oldest one still preserved – it dates back to 1844. Since 1875 the shrine “listens” to the name “Ebara Jinja”, after the former district of Shinagawa, which however lost its independence in 1947.

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

The deities worshipped here take care of happiness, success in learning, prosperity in business, road safety, curing illness, family safety and love. Obviously there is hardly any reason not to make a short stop here.

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Samezu Hachiman Jinja
(鮫洲八幡神社)

Quite far south of our route we find the Samezu Hachiman Jinja (鮫洲八幡神社 / さめすはちまんじんじゃ). It is not as old as the surrounding temples (the exact date of foundation is unknown anyway – it must have been sometime in the second half of the 17th century). At that time there was a fishing settlement called Ohayashi-machi (御林町 / おはやしまち) – that is why the shrine was originally called “Ohayashi Hachiman Jinja”. Izanami no mikoto (伊弉冉尊 / いざなみのみこと) and Izanagi no mikoto (伊弉諾神 / いざなぎのみこと) are also worshipped here. These two primal gods of Japanese mythology are not just “any” deities, but so to speak mother and father of the most important deity of Japan, the sun goddess Amaterasu ōmikami (天照大神 / あまてらすおおみかみ) and her brother Susanoo no mikoto (素戔嗚尊 / すさの・おのみこと). Izanagi no mikoto could therefore also be called one of the great-great-great…-grandfathers of Japan’s first emperor.

The main building of the shrine dates back to 1972 – but the shrine area impresses most with its enchanted atmosphere and the two neighbouring small shrines (Inari Jinja / 稲荷神社 and Itsukushima Jinja / 厳島神社) with a carp pond (which is also home to a lot of water turtles).

On the worldly side

Statue of Sakamoto Ryōma in Tachiaigawa
(立会川の坂本竜馬像)

(one of the “one hundred scenic spots in Shinagawa”)

Sakamoto Ryōma (坂本竜馬/ さかもとりょうま), who was born on January 3, 1836 in Tosa (today Kōchi) and died on December 10, 1867 in Kyōto, is considered one of the pioneers of the Meiji Restoration, at the end of which (shortly after Sakamoto’s death) the emperor again took over all worldly power from the Tokugawa Shōguns who had ruled for over 250 years until then. Today revered as one of the national heroes, he was – in his days – certainly considered more of a terrorist, because he openly rebelled against the authority of the state by attacking the Tokugawa government, but also by rebelling against an opening of the country. The fact that he did not die “of natural causes” (the background and context of his murder was never clarified) should not come as a surprise.

Sakamoto Ryōma-Statue in Tachiaigawa (立会川の坂本竜馬像)

Statue of Sakamoto Ryōma in Tachiaigawa (立会川の坂本竜馬像)

The statue here in Shinagawa – like many others – is currently revered as a symbol of a successful fight against the Corona pandemic. On the sign at the feet of the great rebel is written: “私たちはコロナに負けないぜよ!”, which has been “kind of” translated as “We would not lose to CORONA!

Shinagawa Hanakaidō
(品川花海道)

(one of the “one hundred scenic spots in Shinagawa”)

There will always be quite a variety of points of view, when it comes to whether a location can pass for a “picturesque place”. The Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道 / しながわはなかいどう) provides an eloquent testimony to this. However, please keep in mind, the park cannot be blamed for the fact that I was a little late for the Cosmos blossoms…

Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道)

Shinagawa Hanakaidō
(品川花海道)

Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道)

Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道)


Der alte Tōkaidō (旧東海道) (dt.)

12. October 2020

Edozeitlicher Highway lädt zur Reise in die Vergangenheit ein

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Der alte Tōkaidō (旧東海道)

Der alte Tōkaidō (旧東海道) (zum Vergrößern bitte anklicken)

Der Tōkaidō (東海道 / とうかいどう) ist eine der wenigen wichtigen Überlandstraßen Japans, deren Name man auch außerhalb des Landes schon einmal gehört hat (meistens in Verbindung mit der „Tōkaidō“-Linie im Hochgeschwindigkeitszug-Netz (Shinkansen / 新幹線) von Japan Railways, die die Städte Tōkyō und Ōsaka miteinander verbindet). Im Allgemeinen ist damit aber die historische Fernstraße gemeint, die in der Edo-Zeit (江戸時代 / えどじだい) (1603-1867) die alte Kaiserstadt Kyōto (京都 / きょうと) mit dem Sitz des Tokugawa Shōgunats (徳川幕府 / とくがわばくふ) in Edo (江戸 / えど) verband. Die Straße war eine vielbesungene – und sicher noch öfter Gegenstand künstlerischer Betrachtung (nicht wenigen werden die farbenfrohen Holzdrucke der „53 Stationen des Tōkaidō“ (東海道五十三次 / とうかいどうごじゅうさんつぎ) ein Begriff sein).
In Wirklichkeit gehen die Anfänge dieser wichtigen Straße aber auf ein Straßensystem, das man im frühen 8. Jahrhundert aus China übernommen hatte, zurück. Eine größere Bedeutung erlangte der Tōkaidō erst in der Zeit des Kamakura-Shōgunats (鎌倉幕府 / かまくらばふく), das ab dem Ende des 12. Jahrhunderts seinen Regierungssitz in Kamakura hatte (ca. 50 km Luftlinie südlich des heutigen Tōkyō am Pazifik gelegen). Aber natürlich war diese Straße die sicher wichtigste in der Edo-Zeit, als man über sie auf einer Strecke von 488 km zwischen den beiden wichtigsten Städten des Reiches, Kyōto und Edo (dem heutigen Tōkyō) pendeln konnte (wenn man eine Erlaubnis dazu erwirkt hatte – aber das ist ein anderes Thema, dessen Erörterung hier zu weit führen würde).

Heute „lebt“ der Tōkaidō im Wesentlichen in Streckenabschnitten (die als normale Straßen, ja sogar als Nationalstraße genutzt werden) und in Namen weiter.

Kein Wunder also, dass es auch in Tōkyō, dem alten Edo, einen Tōkaidō gibt. Der nennt sich, weil er ja nicht mehr als Fernstraße genutzt wird und „nur“ noch an die alten Zeiten erinnert „Kyū Tōkaidō“ (旧東海道 / きゅうとうかいどう), ehemaliger Tōkaidō. Er verläuft besonders „erwanderbar“ von Kita Shinagawa (北品川 / きたしながわ) bis zum Shinagawa Aquarium (品川水族館 / しながわすいぞくかん) auf einer Länge von knapp fünf Kilometern. Und auf dieser Strecke ist er nicht einfach nur eine historische Straße, sondern auch eine, die selbst heute noch erkennen lässt, wie wichtig sie einst gewesen sein muss. Der Weg ist gesäumt von einer fast schon nicht mehr zählbaren Vielzahl an Tempeln und Schreinen. Einen davon kennen aufmerksame Leser dieser Webseite bereits:

Die sechs Jizō Bosatsu von Edo (江戸六地蔵)
– Ein Pilgerweg quer durch Tōkyō zu uralten kupfernen Jizō-Skulpturen

Gleich die erste und älteste der in dem Artikel beschriebenen Jizō-Statuen ist im Honsen-Tempel (品川寺 / ほんせんじ) zu finden – einem der bemerkenswerten buddhistischen Tempel entlang des alten Tōkaidō.

Das Straßenbild

Lassen Sie uns die alte Hauptverbindungsstraße aber von Norden nach Süden beschlendern. Natürlich hat das Straßenbild heute nichts mehr mit dem zu tun, was sich in alten Edo-Tagen dem Auge geboten hat, aber auch heute merkt man der Straße an, dass sie eine geschäftige gewesen ist. In den vergangenen Jahren hat man erneut in die Infrastruktur investiert, den Straßenbelag erneuert, mehr Platz für Fußgänger geschaffen und offensichtlich auch den Einzelhandel zur Ansiedlung (oder doch zumindest zum Durchhalten) ermuntert. Dennoch frisst sich die Großstadt auch in diesen eher kleinstädtischen Siedlungsabschnitt vor. Allmählich entstehen immer größere Appartementhäuser.

Die Tempel

Honkō-ji
(本光寺)

Die Ursprünge des Tempels sind unbekannt. Man geht aber davon aus, dass der Honkō-ji (本光寺 / ほんこうじ) im Jahre 1382 diesen Namen erhalten hat. Allerdings wurde der Tempel in der Muromachi-Zeit (1336-1573) der Hokke-Sekte zugeschlagen. Man sagt, der dritte der Tokugawa Shōgune, Tokugawa Iemitsu (徳川家光 / とくがわいえみつ) habe den Tempel besucht. Wie so viele andere Gebäude Tōkyōs wurde die Haupthalle des Honkō-ji im großen Erdbeben von 1923 zerstört und 1926 wieder aufgebaut. Beim Zusammenschluss mehrerer Schulen (Sekten) des japanischen Buddhismus, kam der Tempel 1941 zur Nichiren-Sekte, die er nach dem 2. Weltkrieg aber wieder verließ.

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

Honkō-ji (本光寺)

Nach erneuten Zerstörungen im zweiten Weltkrieg wurde die Haupthalle 1968 neu errichtet. Die heute die Anlage optisch beherrschende Pagode stammt aus dem Jahr 1985.

Honei-ji
(本榮寺)

Viel Historisches ist vom Honei-ji (本榮寺 / ほんえいじ) nicht bekannt. Aber immerhin behauptet man, der Tempel sei im Jahre 1574 gegründet worden.

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Honei-ji (本榮寺)

Tenmyōkoku-ji
(天妙国寺)

Der Legende nach wurde der Tempel 1285 von Tenmei (天目 / てんめい), einem Schüler von Nichiren (日蓮 / にちれん) erbaut. Ab dem Ende des 16. Jahrhunderts war der Tempel eng mit dem Hause Tokugawa (徳川 / とくがわ) verbunden. Eine aus dem 15. Jahrhundert stammende fünfstöckige Pagode wurde 1614 durch einen Sturm zerstört, aber vom dritten Tokugawa Shōgun erneuert, bevor sie 1702 erneut zerstört – diesmal durch Feuer – und danach nie mehr aufgebaut wurde.

Tenmyōkoku-ji (天妙国寺), Sanmon (山門)

Tenmyōkoku-ji (天妙国寺), Sanmon (山門)

Man betritt das Gelände des Tenmyōkoku-ji (天妙国寺 / てんみょうこくじ) klassischerweise durch das Sanmon (山門 / さんもん). Dieses strahlend Rote Haupttor erscheint sicher nicht nur deswegen so „neuwertig“, weil es erst 1955 errichtet wurde, sondern auch, weil es seither sicher mehrfach Anstriche erfahren hat. Es gehört zu den „100 schönen Ansichten von Shinagawa“ – und man fühlt sich fast versucht, zu sagen: Mit Recht! Auch die wuchtige Haupthalle, die Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts errichtet wurde, fällt deutlich aus der Masse der kleinen Tempel in der Nachbarschaft heraus.

Shinryō-ji
(真了寺)

Der Shinryō-ji (真了寺 / しんりょうじ) wurde 1673 als Nichiren-Tempel gegründet. Seit mehr als 20 Jahren ist er ein Tierfriedhof – eine Marktlücke, die in Tōkyō sicher auch einträglich sein wird – ohne dass dafür wirklich eine Leistung erbracht werden muss (für Tiere natürlich noch viel weniger als für Menschen) – da man hier zur Vermenschlichung seiner Haustiere ja besonders neigt. Für den Besucher ist aber wahrscheinlich das wuchtige Haupttor mit den beiden Elefanten ohnehin eindrucksvoller.

Kaiun-ji
(海雲寺)

(einer der hundert malerischen Orte Shinagawas)

Auch der Kaiun-ji (海雲寺 / かいうんじ) gehört zu den 100 „scenic spots“ von Shinagawa. Und besonders bei ihm fragt man sich, wie es dann sein kann, dass sein Gelände dermaßen verwildert ist.
Der Ursprung des Tempels soll eine Pagode sein, die 1251 errichtet wurde. Zunächst gehörte der Tempel der Rinzai-Sekte an, wurde aber 1596 in seinen heutigen Namen umbenannt und kam zur Sōtō-Sekte.

Auf dem Gelände des Tempels befinden sich mehrere Kulturgüter, so z.B. eine elfköpfige Kannon, die aus dem Jahre 1251 (also aus dem Jahr der Errichtung des Tempels) stammen soll. Außerdem steht der Tempel im Zusammenhang mit dem christlichen Shimabara-Aufstand des Jahres 1637, bei dem die hier verehrten Nabeshima (Seitenlinie der Fujiwara) das Tokugawa Shōgunat unterstützten (sie hatten von den Tokugawa eines der reichsten Lehen des Landes, Saga, erhalten). Letztendlich war es ja dieser Aufstand gewesen, der zur Abschließung Japans für über 200 Jahre führte.
Dieser Tempel befindet sich übrigens in nächster Nachbarschaft zum eingangs schon erwähnten Honsen-Tempel (品川寺 / ほんせんじ) mit seiner imposanten Jizō-Statue.

Die Schreine

Ebara Jinja
(荏原神社)

Ganz im Norden, am Nordufer des Meguro-Flusses (目黒川 / めぐろがわ) gelegen, befindet sich der Ebara Jinja (荏原神社 / えばらじんじゃ). Dieser uralte Schrein geht auf eine Gründung aus dem Jahre 709 zurück – hier wurden sowohl Götter aus der damaligen Kaiserstadt Nara (奈良 / なら) (damals noch Heijō-kyō 〈平城京 / へいじょうきょう〉 genannt), verehrt, als auch später Götter aus der „ewigen“ Kaiserstadt Kyōto (京都 / きょうと) (damals noch Heian-kyō 〈平安京 / へいあんきょう〉 oder schlicht und ergreifend Miyako 〈京 oder 都 / みやこ〉 , „kaiserliche Residenz“ genannt).
Während des Tokugawa Shōgunats (徳川幕府 / とくがわばくふ) (1603-1867) erfreute sich der Schrein der besonderen Förderung durch den Tokugawa-Clan.

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Nach der Übernahme der Regierungsgewalt durch den Meiji-Kaiser im Jahre 1868 wurde der Schrein sogar eine kaiserliche Stätte. Das Hauptgebäude des Schreins ist das älteste noch erhaltene – es stammt aus dem Jahre 1844. Seit 1875 „hört“ der Schrein auf den Namen „Ebara Jinja“, nach dem damaligen Stadtbezirk Shinagawas, der aber 1947 seine Eigenständigkeit verloren hat.

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Die hier verehrten Gottheiten kümmern sich um das Glück, Erfolg beim Lernen, den Wohlstand im Geschäftsleben, die Verkehrssicherheit, die Heilung von Krankheit, die Sicherheit der Familie und die Liebe. Offensichtlich gibt es kaum einen Grund, hier nicht einen kurzen Zwischenstopp einzulegen.

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Ebara Jinja (荏原神社)

Samezu Hachiman Jinja
(鮫洲八幡神社)

Ziemlich weit im Süden unserer Strecke finden wir den Samezu Hachiman Jinja (鮫洲八幡神社 / さめすはちまんじんじゃ). Der kann es vom Alter her zwar mit den umliegenden Tempeln nicht aufnehmen (das genaue Gründungsdatum ist ohnehin unbekannt – es muss irgendwann in der zweiten Hälfte des 17. Jahrhunderts gelegen haben). Damals befand sich hier eine Fischersiedlung, die sich Ohayashi-machi (御林町 / おはやしまち) nannte – deswegen ist auch der Schrein ursprünglich „Ohayashi Hachiman Jinja“ genannt worden. Hier werden u.a. auch Izanami no mikoto (伊弉冉尊 / いざなみのみこと) und Izanagi no mikoto (伊弉諾神 / いざなぎのみこと) verehrt. Diese beiden Urgötter der japanischen Mythologie sind nicht einfach „irgendwelche“ Gottheiten, sondern sozusagen Mutter und Vater der wichtigsten Gottheit Japan, der Sonnengöttin Amaterasu ōmikami (天照大神 / あまてらすおおみかみ) und ihres Bruders Susanoo no mikoto (素戔嗚尊 / すさの・おのみこと). Izanagi no mikoto könnte also auch einer der Urururväter des ersten Kaisers Japans bezeichnet werden.

Das Hauptgebäude des Schreins stammt aus dem Jahr 1972 – aber wirklich beeindruckend ist das Schreingelände durch seine verwunschen wirkende Atmosphäre und die benachbarten beiden kleinen Schreine (Inari-Schrein / 稲荷神社 und Itsukushima-Schrein / 厳島神社) mit einem Karpfenteich (der auch jede Menge Wasserschildkröten beheimatet).

Das eher Weltliche

Sakamoto Ryōma-Statue in Tachiaigawa
(立会川の坂本竜馬像)

(einer der hundert malerischen Orte Shinagawas)

Der am 3. Januar 1836 in Tosa (heute Kōchi) geborene und am 10. Dezember 1867 in Kyōto gestorbene Sakamoto Ryōma (坂本竜馬 / さかもとりょうま) gilt als einer der Wegbereiter der Meiji-Restauration, an deren Ende (kurz nach dem Tod Sakamotos) der Kaiser wieder alle weltliche Macht von den bis dahin über 250 Jahre regierenden Tokugawa Shōgunen übernahm. Heute als einer der Nationalhelden verehrt, galt er zu seinen Lebenzeiten zunächst sicher mehr als Terrorist, denn er lehnte ich ganz offen gegen die Autorität des Staats auf, indem er die Regierung der Tokugawa attackierte, sich aber auch gegen eine Öffnung des Landes aufbegehrte. Dass er keines natürlichen Todes gestorben ist (die Hintergründe und Zusammenhänge seiner Ermordung wurden nie aufgeklärt), darf einen nicht verwundern.

Sakamoto Ryōma-Statue in Tachiaigawa (立会川の坂本竜馬像)

Sakamoto Ryōma-Statue in Tachiaigawa (立会川の坂本竜馬像)

Die Statue hier in Shinagawa – wie viele andere auch – wird derzeit als Symbol für einen erfolgreichen Kampf gegen die Corona-Pandemie verehrt. Auf dem Schild zu Füßen des großen Rebellen steht geschrieben: „私たちはコロナに負けないぜよ!”, was etwas linkisch mit „We would not lose to CORONA!“ übersetzt wurde.

Shinagawa Hanakaidō
(品川花海道)

(einer der hundert malerischen Orte Shinagawas)

Die Auffassung darüber, was als “malerischer Ort” durchgehen kann und was nicht, kann man sicher einer weiten Bandbreite unterwerfen. Der Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道 / しながわはなかいどう) legt ein beredtes Zeugnis davon aus. Allerdings ist es der Anlage ja nicht vorzuwerfen, wenn ich etwas zu spät für die Cosmos-Blüte dort war…

Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道)

Shinagawa Hanakaidō
(品川花海道)

Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道)

Shinagawa Hanakaidō (品川花海道)


Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (Engl.)

26. September 2020

A building of great expectations

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

A German version of this posting you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden sie hier.

In September 2020 the brand-new “Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal” (東京国際クルーズターミナル) in Tōkyō’s Kōtō district (江東区 / こうとうく) was opened, obviously with much less ballyhoo than originally planned. Its precise location is on the island of Odaiba (お台場 / おだいば).

For more information about the former “city of the future”, which was supposed to be built on Odaiba, take a look at this article:

Odaiba (お台場)
– There are pretty things one can create even from the left-overs of the bubble years

This new terminal complements (if not replaces) the old cruise ship terminal in Harumi, which cannot be accessed by the world’s largest cruise ships due to the height restrictions of Tōkyō’s port bridges. You will find more information about the terminal in Harumi in the following article:

Moon Island, a Shout of Victory and Sunny Sea
Tsukishima, Kachidoki and Harumi – The “older ones“ among Tōkyō’s man-made islands

The fact that Tōkyō needed a new terminal for cruise ships had become increasingly clear in recent years, as the size of these ships kept growing to new, previously undreamed-of dimensions every year. While the “Queen Mary II” was for a long time something like a “gold standard” for infrastructures to be built – way back then (in 2003) this ship’s dimensions were considered almost „larger than life“ (345 metres long, 41 metres wide, 10.30 metres maximum draught and – perhaps most importantly: 41 metres high above water level) – have since been exceeded several times over.

Currently the largest cruise ship in the world, the “Symphony of the Seas” is 362 metres long, 66 metres wide and no less than 70 metres high. In other words: there are not many bridges in the world under which she can fit – neither under the Yokohama Bay Bridge (clearance height 55 metres), nor under the Tōkyō Rainbow Bridge (clearance height 60 metres), nor under the Tōkyō Gate Bridge (clearance height 54 metres).

Cities that want to welcome the very large cruise ships without having to have them dock in the rather unappealing cargo ports (as has so far been the case in Yokohama and Tōkyō) had to find ways and means to provide moorings that could be approached without the imponderability of the passage height of bridges. The existing terminals at Tōkyō Bay are not suitable for this – neither the elegant Ōsanbashi (大さん橋国際客船ターミナル / おおさんばしこくさいきゃくせんたーみなる) in Yokohama, nor the old cruise ship terminal Tōkyōs in Harumi (see above).

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

As for so many construction plans in Tōkyō, the Summer Olympics planned for 2020 were a welcome occasion to renew existing infrastructure or build completely new ones. Following the example of London, where cruise ships were also used to expand the capital’s hotel capacities, this was planned for Tōkyō as well. Now (at least for the time being) everything has turned out quite differently. Nevertheless, the building was built as planned – after all, Japan is known for its ability to implement construction plans on time.

Ground floor of the terminal:

This kind of professionalism and timelyness also applies to the new cruise ship terminal on Odaiba. It would certainly have been a welcome meeting place for the world’s proudest ships at the start of the 2020 Summer Olympics. However, a pandemic has thwarted so many plans – not only for the terminal. It was opened, albeit with a two-month delay. For the time being, it is not needed (at least not for its main purpose) – but it is open to interested visitors and gives them an impression of how it is planned to handle large crowds of people (regarding today’s cruise ships one is almost tempted to speak of “heavy crowds” – reminiscent not only of the sheer number of passengers, but also of their average girth…).

First floor of the terminal:

Irrespective of the current situation (which of course no one could have predicted when construction began), the new terminal is intended to respond to the rapidly increasing demand for cruise ships. A lot of money has been invested in this. According to newspaper reports, the terminal construction has swallowed up 39 billion yen (approx. 320 million euros).

Second floor of the terminal:

The architects’ office responsible (Yasui Architects & Engineers, Inc. / 安井建築設計事務所 / やすいけんちくせきけいじむしょ), which by the way has gained some fame with buildings such as the Suntory Hall in Tōkyō or the International Terminal 3 at Tōkyō’s Haneda Airport, as well as with international construction projects, claims that the exterior design resembles Japanese temple architecture – some people will have to look very closely to recognise this stylistic relationship. In any case, more than 19,000 square metres of space are distributed over four above-ground levels (there are no basement levels, as the entire complex is located in the middle of the water).

Third floor & the terminal’s viewing terrace:

The top floor of the terminal not only offers a great view of the pier as such, but also towards the city centre, the neighbouring ship-shaped “Museum for Maritime Science” (船の科学館), the surrounding area and the port facilities of Tōkyō.

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3. OG) - Aussichtsterrasse

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3rd fl) – viewing terrace

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3. OG) - Aussichtsterrasse

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3rd fl) – viewing terrace

For the time being, the Japanese cruise ship “Nippon Maru” (にっぽん丸) has docked at the terminal – there is nothing better to do for her at the moment.

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (1. OG) - Nippon Maru (日本丸)

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (1. OG) – Nippon Maru (にっぽん丸)

Opening hours:

Daily from 9 am to 5 pm
Free admission

Please note that presently only very limited services are offered (there is only one drinks machine on the ground floor).

The premises available in the multi-purpose area on the 2nd floor can be rented (3,000 sqm between 400,000 and 500,000 yen per day, or 100 sqm between 15,000 and 17,000 yen per day).

The terminal is also available for professional photo and video shootings on request. The prices for such purposes are 5,000 yen per hour (for photo shoots) and 20,000 yen per hour (for video shoots) – whereby periods of assembly and dismantling are to be included in these rental periods.

Hygiene rules currently in force:

The operator shall ensure the following:

  • Alcohol-based disinfectants are available at the entrance.
  • The facility is ventilated regularly.
  • The number of seats is currently reduced to avoid mass gatherings.
  • Door handles, handrails, benches, nursing rooms etc. are disinfected regularly.
  • Transparent barriers have been erected at counters.
  • Employees in contact with customers wear breathing masks.

Visitors shall obey the following:

  • Visitors must wear respiratory masks.
  • Minimum distances between persons must be observed.
  • Inside the building speaking with loud voices is prohibted.
  • Body temperature is to be measured with the thermographs installed at the entrance.
  • In case of fever or indisposition, visitors must refrain from visiting the building.

How to get there:

The easiest way to get there is by Yurikamome (新交通ゆりかもめ / しんこうつうゆりかもめ), which serves the islands off the city centre between Shinbashi (新橋 / しんばし) and Toyosu (豊洲 / とよす). Get off at Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル / とうきょうこくさいくるーずたーみなる).
By the way, the Yurikamome is named after the prefectural bird of Tōkyō, the black-headed gull.


Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (dt.)

24. September 2020

Ein Bauwerk großer Erwartungen

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Im September 2020 wurde mit sicher wesentlich kleinerem als ursprünglich mal geplantem Tamtam das funkelnagelneue „Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal“ (東京国際クルーズターミナル) im Bezirk Kōtō (江東区 / こうとうく) Tōkyōs eröffnet. Genauer: auf der Insel Odaiba (お台場 / おだいば).

Für nähere Information zur ehemaligen „Stadt der Zukunft“, die auf Odaiba entstehen sollte, schauen Sie sich diesen Artikel an:

Odaiba (お台場)
– Auch aus den Überbleibseln der Boom-Jahre kann man etwas Hübsches machen

Dieses neue Terminal ergänzt (wenn nicht gar ersetzt) das alte Kreuzfahrtschiffterminal in Harumi, das aufgrund der Einschränkungen bei der Durchfahrthöhe der Hafenbrücken Tōkyōs von den ganz großen Kreuzfahrtschiffen dieser Welt nicht angefahren werden kann. Näheres über das Terminal in Harumi finden Sie u.a. in folgendem Artikel:

Mondinsel, Triumphschrei und sonniges Meer
Tsukishima, Kachidoki und Harumi – die „älteren“ unter Tōkyōs künstlichen Inseln

Dass Tōkyō ein neues Terminal für Kreuzfahrtschiffe brauchte, war in den vergangenen Jahren immer deutlicher geworden, nachdem diese Schiffe jedes Jahr zu neuen, vorher ungeahnten Dimensionen angewachsen waren. War die „Queen Mary II“ für lange Zeit der „Goldstandard“, nach dem Infrastrukturen aufgebaut wurden, wurden deren damals (2003) beachtlichen Maße (345 Meter Länge, 41 Meter Breite, 10,30 Meter maximaler Tiefgang und – was vielleicht am wichtigsten ist: 41 Meter Höhe über dem Wasserspiegel – in der Zwischenzeit mehrfach übertroffen.

Das derzeit größte Kreuzfahrtschiff der Welt, die „Symphony of the Seas“ ist 362 Meter lang, 66 Meter breit und sage und schreibe 70 Meter hoch. Sprich: Es gibt auf dieser Welt nicht allzu viele Brücken, unter denen sie hindurch passt – so auch weder unter der Yokohama Bay Bridge (Durchfahrthöhe 55 Meter), noch unter der Tōkyō Rainbow Bridge (Durchfahrthöhe 60 Meter), noch unter der Tōkyō Gate Bridge (Durchfahrthöhe 54 Meter).

Wer die ganz großen Kreuzfahrtschiffe willkommen heißen wollte, ohne diese (wie in Yokohama und Tōkyō bisher immer geschehen) in den eher wenig gastfreundlichen Frachthäfen anlegen lassen zu müssen, musste also Mittel und Wege finden, Anlegestellen zu finden, die ohne die Unwägbarkeit der Durchfahrthöhe von Brücken angefahren werden konnten. Die bisher vorhandenen Terminals an der Tōkyō Bay taugen hierfür nicht – weder die elegante Ōsanbashi (大さん橋国際客船ターミナル / おおさんばしこくさいきゃくせんたーみなる) in Yokohama, noch das alte Kreuzfahrtschiffterminal Tōkyōs in Harumi (siehe oben).

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル)

Wie für so viele Baupläne in Tōkyō, waren auch hier die für 2020 geplanten olympischen Sommerspiele ein willkommener Anlass, die vorhandenen Infrastrukturen zu erneuern oder ganz neue zu errichten. Dem Beispiel Londons folgend, wo auch Kreuzfahrtschiffe genutzt wurden, um die Hotelkapazitäten der Hauptstadt zu erweitern, war dies auch für Tōkyō geplant. Nun ist alles (zumindest vorerst) ganz anders gekommen. Gebaut ist aber trotzdem geworden – und Japan ist ja eher bekannt dafür, dass es übernommene Baupläne dann auch fristgerecht umsetzt.

Erdgeschoss des Terminals:

All das gilt auch für das neue Kreuzfahrtschiffterminal auf Odaiba. Es wäre sicher zum Beginn der olympischen Sommerspiele 2020 willkommene Anlaufstelle für die stolzesten Schiffe dieser Welt gewesen. Eine Pandemie hat die Pläne – nicht nur für das Terminal – durchkreuzt. Eröffnet wurde es, wenn auch mit zwei Monaten Verspätung, trotzdem. Einstweilen wird es zwar nicht gebraucht (zumindest nicht für seinen Hauptzweck) – es steht dennoch interessierten Besuchern offen und zeigt, wie man geplant hatte, großen Menschenmengen (bei den heutigen Kreuzfahrtschiffen ist man fast schon versucht, von „Menschenmassen“ zu sprechen – als Reminiszenz nicht nur an die schiere Passagierzahl, sondern auch an den durchschnittlichen Leibesumfang derselben…) Herr zu werden.

Erstes Obergeschoss des Terminals:

Unabhängig von der derzeitigen Situation (die bei Baubeginn natürlich kein Mensch abschätzen konnte), will/wollte man mit dem neuen Terminal auf die rasant steigende Kreuzfahrtnachfrage reagieren. Dafür hat man ordentlich Geld in die Hand genommen. Zeitungsberichten zufolge hat der Terminalbau 39 Milliarden Yen (ca. 320 Millionen Euro) verschlungen.

Zweites Obergeschoss des Terminals:

Das verantwortliche Architekturbüro (Yasui Architects & Engineers, Inc. / 安井建築設計事務所 / やすいけんちくせきけいじむしょ), das sich übrigens auch einen Namen mit Bauwerken wie der Suntory Hall in Tōkyō oder dem internationalen Terminal 3 des Tōkyōter Flughafens Haneda, sowie bei internationalen Bauprojekten gemacht hat, behauptet, das Außendesign ähnele japanischer Tempelarchitektur – mancher wird schon sehr genau hinsehen müssen, um diese stilistische Verwandtschaft erkennen zu können. Jedenfalls verteilen sich auf vier oberirdischen Ebenen (es gibt keine Untergeschosse, da der gesamte Komplex mitten im Wasser steht) mehr als 19.000 Quadratmeter Fläche.

Drittes Obergeschoss & Aussichtsterrasse des Terminals:

Die oberste Etage des Terminals bietet nicht nur einen tollen Blick auf das Pier als solches, sondern auch in Richtung Innenstadt, zum benachbarten, schiffsförmigen “Schifffahrtsmuseum” (船の科学館), in die nähere Umgebung, bis hin zu den Hafenanlagen Tōkyōs.

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3. OG) - Aussichtsterrasse

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3. OG) – Aussichtsterrasse

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3. OG) - Aussichtsterrasse

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (3. OG) – Aussichtsterrasse

Derzeit hat das japanische Kreuzfahrtschiff „Nippon Maru“ (にっぽん丸) am Terminal angelegt – es hat momentan nichts Besseres zu tun.

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (1. OG) - Nippon Maru (日本丸)

Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル) (1. OG) – Nippon Maru (にっぽん丸)

Öffnungszeiten:

Täglich von 9 Uhr bis 17:00 Uhr
Keine Eintrittsgebühr

Bitte beachten Sie, dass b.a.w. nur sehr stark eingeschränkte Service-Leistungen angeboten werden (im Erdgeschoss ist nur ein Getränkeautomat in Betrieb).

Die Räumlichkeiten, die im Mehrzweckbereich des 2. Obergeschosses zur Verfügung stehen, können gemietet werden (3.000 qm zwischen 400.000 und 500.000 Yen pro Tag, bzw. 100 qm zwischen 15.000 und 17.000 Yen pro Tag).

Außerdem steht das Terminal auf Anfrage auch für professionelle Foto- und Videoshootings zur Verfügung. Die Preise hierfür liegen bei 5.000 Yen pro Stunde (für Fotoshootings) und 20.000 Yen pro Stunde (für Videoshootings) – wobei Zeiten des Auf- und Abbaus in diese Mietzeiten einzurechnen sind.

Derzeit geltende Hygieneregeln:

Der Betreiber sorgt für folgendes:

  • Desinfektionsmittel auf Alkoholbasis stehen am Eingang zur Verfügung.
  • Die Anlage wird regelmäßig gelüftet.
  • Die Anzahl der Sitzgelegenheiten ist derzeit reduziert, um Massenansammlungen zu vermeiden.
  • Türgriffe, Handläufe, Bänke, Stillzimmer etc. werden regelmäßig desinfiziert.
  • An Schaltern wurden durchsichtige Barrieren errichtet.
  • Mitarbeiter mit Kundenkontakt tragen Atemschutzmasken.

Von Besuchern wird verlangt:

  • Besucher haben Atemschutzmasken zu tragen.
  • Mindestabstände zwischen Personen sind einzuhalten.
  • Innerhalb des Gebäudes ist nicht mit lauter Stimme zu sprechen.
  • Körpertemperatur ist mit den am Eingang installierten Thermographen zu messen.
  • Bei Fieber oder Unwohlsein ist auf ein Besuch des Gebäudes zu verzichten.

Wie man hinkommt:

Am leichtesten mit der Yurikamome (新交通ゆりかもめ / しんこうつうゆりかもめ), die die Inseln vor der Innenstadt zwischen Shinbashi (新橋 / しんばし) und Toyosu (豊洲 / とよす) bedient. Steigen Sie am Bahnhof Tōkyō International Cruise Terminal (東京国際クルーズターミナル / とうきょうこくさいくるーずたーみなる) aus.
Übrigens, die Yurikamome ist nach dem Präfekturvogel der Präfektur Tōkyō benannt, der Lachmöwe.


Ingwer-Ausstellung im Shinjuku Gyoen (新宿御苑)

18. September 2020

Eine der wundersamsten Wurzeln – einmal näher betrachtet

Fackel-Inwer (Etlingera elatior) / トーチジンジャー

Fackel-Inwer (Etlingera elatior) / トーチジンジャー

Kaum ein Rhizom (Wurzelstock) ist so bekannt und vielseitig in der Verwendung, wie die der zur Familie der „Ingwergewächse“ (Zingiber) gehörenden Pflanzen. Aber kaum eine bekommt man (in mitteleuropäischen Breiten) tatsächlich auch mal zu sehen. Dass diese Pflanzen die prächtigsten Blüten hervorzubringen wissen, ist vielen ebenso unbekannt, wie deren erstaunlichen medizinischen Einsatzgebiete (dem aus Gingerolen und Shogaolen bestehenden Balsam der Wurzel wird antioxidative, antiemetische, entzündungshemmende und anregende Eigenschaften nachgesagt).

Im asiatischen Raum wird die Pflanze schon seit jeher zur Behandlung von Rheuma, Muskelschmerzen und Erkältungen verordnet.

Ingwerblüte

Ingwerblüte

Keine Angst, jetzt folgt kein botanischer Fachvortrag und auch keine medizinische Abhandlung über die wundersame Wirkung der Ingwerwurzel. Wer sich beim Wissen um Ingwer mit dem gelegentlich getrunkenen „Ginger Ale“ begnügt, sollte aber zumindest wissen, dass dieses Erfrischungsgetränk seinen Namen dem Zusatz natürlichen Inwers (engl. ginger) verdankt, und nicht etwa von Herrn Coca Cola erfunden, sondern erstmals von dem aus Deutschland stammenden Uhrmacher und Silberschmied Jacob Schweppe (1740-1821) produziert wurde (und nur wo „Schweppes“ draufsteht, ist auch „Schweppes“ drin…).

Hier geht es um eine kleine, aber feine Ausstellung, die es im Gewächshaus des Shinjuku Gyoen vom 15. bis 27. September 2020 zu sehen gibt. Das Motto dieser Ausstellung verliert seinen Wohlklang, wenn man es übersetzt, deswegen soll es hier im japanischen Originalwortlaut wiedergegeben werden:

ショウガの紹介しましょうか?
Shouga no shoukai shimashouka?

Dürfen wir Ihnen Ingwer vorstellen?

Shinjuku Gyoen - Ingwerausstellung

Shinjuku Gyoen – Ingwerausstellung

Bei den hier ausgestellten Ingergewächsen wird ein besonderes Augenmerk auf deren Wurzelstöcke gelegt. Einige davon sollen hier wiedergegeben werden.

Für all diejenigen, die tiefer in die Materie einsteigen möchten, sind die genannten Ingwersorten mit ihren genauen Gattungsbezeichnungen (auch auf Japanisch) wiedergegeben.

Bitte klicken Sie die Fotos zum Vergrößern an!

Zingiber officinale
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Ingwer (Zingiber)

ショウガ
ショウガ科
ショウガ属
Der bekannteste und am häufigsten als Gewürz verwendete Inwer.

Zingiber spectabile
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Ingwer (Zingiber)

オオヤマショウガ
ショウガ科
ショウガ属

Zingiber zerumbet
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Ingwer (Zingiber)

シャンプージンジャー
ショウガ科
ショウガ属

Alpinia albolineata
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Alpinia

シロフゲットウ
ショウガ科
ハナミョウガ属

Alpinia boninsimensis
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Alpinia

シマクマタケラン
ショウガ科
ハナミョウガ属

Alpinia flabellata
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Alpinia

イリオモテクマタケラン
ショウガ科
ハナミョウガ属

Alpinia intermedia
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Alpinia

アオノクマタケラン
ショウガ科
ハナミョウガ属

Ziterwurzel, Weiße Curcuma (Curcuma zedoaria)
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Curcuma

ガジュシ
ショウガ科
ウコン属

Curcuma phaeocaulis
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Curcuma

ガジュシ
ショウガ科
ウコン属

Fackel-Inwer (Etlingera elatior)
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Etlingera

トーチジンジャー
ショウガ科
エトリンゲラ属
Nach dem Kulmbacher Botaniker Andreas Ernst Etlinger (1756-1785) benannt, aber erst 1792 durch Paul Dietrich Giseke erstmals veröffentlicht

Indischer Gelbwurz (Curcuma longa)
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Curcuma

ウコン
ショウガ科
ウコン属

Curcuma aromatica
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Curcuma

キョウオウ
ショウガ科
ウコン属

Globba winitii
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Globba

グロッバ・ウィニティ
ショウガ科
グロッバ属

Yellow Dancing Girl / Dancing Girl Ginger (Globba schomburgkii)
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Globba

グロッバ・ショウンバーキー
ショウガ科
グロッバ属
Benannt wahrscheinlich nach einem der beiden Schomburg-Brüder (Moritz Richard Schomburgk – 1881-1891 / Robert Hermann Schomburgk – 1804-1865).

Kaempferia pulchra
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Kaempferia

ケンフェリ・プルクラ
ショウガ科
バンウコン属
Benannt nach dem deutschen Forschungs- und Ostasienreisenden Engelbert Kaempfer (1651-1716) – kaum ein Deutscher in Japan kennt ihn nicht.

Kaempferia roscoeana
Familie: Ingwergewächse (Zingiberaceae)
Gattung: Kaempferia

ケンフェリア・ロスコエアナ
ショウガ科
バンウコン属
Natürlich auch benannt nach dem deutschen Forschungs- und Ostasienreisenden Engelbert Kaempfer (1651-1716)

Das Gewächshaus ist täglich, außer montags, von 9:30 Uhr bis 17:30 Uhr geöffnet (in den Ausstellungszeitraum allen auch zwei Nationalfeiertage – 21.9. und 22.9. – an denen der Park und das Gewächshaus selbstverständlich auch geöffnet bleiben). Letzter Einlass um 17 Uhr.

Weitere Details zum Shinjuku Gyoen und den Eintrittsgeldern entnehmen Sie diesem allgemeinen Artikel:

Shinjuku Gyoen Gewächshaus (新宿御苑温室) (Bilder/Pictures)
– Gestern neu eröffnet – heute auf “Ways to Japan”