Tōkyō Camii (東京ジャーミイ) (Engl.)

23. September 2016

Japan’s largest mosque

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

Tōkyō Camii (東京ジャーミイ)

Tōkyō Camii (東京ジャーミイ)

One might be astonished at the sight of a mosque in Japan. But that shouldn’t come as a surprise, as the Islam was as good as unknown herer until the days of the Meiji Restoration (1868). And even today you’ll have to try hard to find a Japanese that would call him/herself a Muslim. The Muslim population of Japan is almost exclusively limited to immigrants from Muslim countries. Traditionally, the largest group of Muslim inhabitants consisted of migrant workers from Bangladesh and Iran.

Apart from other locations, a larger Muslim community developed in Tōkyō from migrants that had left the Sovjet Union soon after the October Revolution. Already in 1938 Tatars from Kazan built the first mosque in Tōkyō. However, this building had to be turned down in 1986, as the ravages of time had played their pranks on it (some other sources state the year 1985 for the demolishment of the old mosque).

The grounds of the old mosque were handed over to the Republic of Turkey by the “Tōkyō Turkish Association” on the condition that the Turkish government was to built a new mosque. After the groundbreaking on 12 April 1996 the construction of a new mosque was started in 1998. When it was inaugurated on 30 June 2000 it was (and still is) the largest mosque in Japan. On 734 sqm of ground one floor below ground and three floor above ground were built, adding up to 1,477 sqm of total floor space. The main hall with its massive dome has a height of 23 metres – the slender minaret next to it is almost 41,5 metres tall.

The basic structure of the mosque was built by the Japanese building company “Kajima Corporation” (鹿島建設株式会社 / かじまけんせつかぶしきがいしゃ), whilst decoration and works of art were mainly carried out by Turkish craftsmen and artisans (for the facade of the mosque large quantities of fine marble were imported from Turkey). The whole building project was a joint venture of Turkish and Japanese know-how.

There is also Turkish cultural centre associated with the mosque.

How to get there:

From the centre of Tōkyō take the trains of the Odakyū line (小田急線 / おだきゅうせん) or the Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda line (東京メトロ千代田線 / とうきゅおうめとろちよだせん) to Yoyogi Uehara (代々木上原 / よよぎうえはら) and from there for just some minutes in western direction (see map below).

Addresse:

Tōkyō Chami & Turkish Culture Center
1-19 Ōyama-chō
Shibuya-ku
Tōkyō 151-0065

東京ジャーミー・トルコ文化センター
151-0065 東京都渋谷区大山町1-19

Special rules for the visit of the mosque:

  • Clothing needs to be modest for both men and women.
  • For women, an ankle length skirt or trousers, which should not be tight fitting or translucent are expected, together with a long sleeved and high-necked top.
  • Men also should not wear short pants.
  • A headscarf is essential for women.
  • A contact form ist required for visits of groups of five or more people.
  • Shoes have to be taken off, before entering the Prayer Hall and placed on shelves inside the hall.
  • Inside the Prayer Hall silence is required.
  • Permission from the mosque’s office is necessary for taking photos or video recording of any kind.
  • No photographs during prayers.
  • You may observe the prayer, however, need to be seated in the back of the Hall and refrain from walking around.
  • The upper floor is for women only.
  • Pets are not allowed inside the building.

Googlemaps:


The former residence of the Maeda (旧前田家本邸)

19. September 2016

Stylish simplicity & representative splendour

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

The “Western style” villas of Tōkyō are – by all means – important cultural assets and touristic spots, as many of them were already built during the Meiji era (1868-1912) and are rather posh representatives of an attitude towards life of the high society of those days.
The former residence of the Iwasaki family (旧岩崎邸 / いわさきてい), the founders of the Mitsubishi Group and the villa of Toranosuke Furukawa (古河虎之助 / ふるかわとらのすけ) located in the stylish gardens of the same name (旧古河庭園 / きゅうふるかわていえん) – both built by the British architect Josiah Conder (whose work I basically don’t really treasure) – may serve as well-known examples.
There were many more of those representative mansions in Tōkyō, but most of them were destroyed either during the great earthquake of 1923 or during the US-American air raids at the end of World War II.

A particularly noble ensemble of buildings was (like the marvellous buildings housing the Teien Art Museum) lucky enough to be built after the earthquake of 1923 – and to survive the last war: The former residence of the Maeda  (旧前田家本邸 / きゅうまえだけほんてい) in Komaba (駒場 / こまば) in Tōkyō’s Meguro ward (目黒区 / めぐろ).

The construction of this residence was ordered by Toshinari Maeda (前田利為 / まえだとしなり). Let’s take a brief look at the gentleman’s background:

He was born on 5 June 1885 as the fifth son of the former daimyō Toshiaki Maeda (前田利昭 / まえだとしあき) of the Nanokaichi Domain (七日市藩 / なのかいちはん) – located in what is now called the Gunma prefecture (群馬県 / ぐんまけん) – and as such he originally belonged to a branch line of the Maeda. However, already in the year 1900 he was adopted into the main branch of the Maeda, as he was supposed to carry on their fortune as the main heir. On 13 June 1900 he was made “marquis” and became the 16th head of the Maeda Clan. As customary in those aristocratic levels of society, he became a member of the upper house of the Japanese parliament, while pursuing his military career. He graduated from the military academy in 1911 – already at that early stage of his career he proved to be an outstanding student (he was awarded the “Emperor’s Sword”). After graduation he continued his military studies in Germany (1913) and went on the Great Britain. In August 1923 he became battalion commander in the 4th Regiment of the Imperial Guard of Japan and served as military attaché to Great Britain from 1927 to 1930, before he became  regimental commander of the 2nd Regiment of the Imperial Guard of Japan. After that he was superintendent of the military academy and was promoted to lieutenant general. With this rank he also retired from active duty in 1939.
His knowledge, however, was again required during the Pacific War, when the commando of the Borneo theatre of war was assigned to him. In the same year he lost his life in a plane crash in September. Only posthumously he was promoted to the rank of general.

So much about the person. Obviously, he had the building of his new residence already ordered while still serving as military attaché in Great Britain, as the larger of the two buildings of the ensemble (the one in Western style) was completed in 1929 already – with the smaller, Japanese style building following a year later.

Here some of the basic data of the buildings:

Western style residence:

  • Reinforced concrete construction by the architect Yasushi Tsukamoto (塚本靖 / つかもとやすし) representing some sort of “Tudor style” with three stories above ground and one below.
  • Building area: 1,129.44 m²
  • Total floor area: 2,930.96 m².

The premises on the ground floor:

The staircase to the first floor:

The premsises on the first floor:

Japanese style residence:

  • Wooden structure with two floors above ground and relatively high ceilings.
  • Building area: 353.89 m²
  • Tatal floor area: 456.68 m²
  • Light weight tile roofing (combination of broad concave tiles and semi-cylindrical convex tiles), copper eaves.

Both buildings also express the refined taste Maeda had acquired during his years in Europe and the fact that got quite accustomed to the advantages of Western housing. The additional building in Japanese style was mainly dedicated to entertain his numerous foreign visitors and guests of honour.

While the rooms in the main (Western style) building were all built and equipped in Western style, only the rooms for the domestic personnel were kept in traditional Japanese style – tatami flooring – hence rather frugal.

Rooms for domestic personnel on the upper floor of the main building:

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

One of the main characteristics of the rooms of the Maeda family was their generous layout – but also the high ceilings and functional, but high-class and modern furniture (unfortunately, most of the furniture can only be seen on fotographs of the time), while even in Maeda’s times the rooms in the Japanese style building remained with almost no furniture whatsoever – maintaining the “wabisabi” (humble simplicity) of the Japanese atmosphere.

Originally, there were some more buildings and a glass hous in the park surrounding the residence, but they haven’t survived the passage of time and events.

After World War II. the buildings were requisitioned by general MacArthur (who was allowed to grace himself with the humble title “Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers”), who used it as a residence for general Ennis Whitehead, the commander of the 5th Air Force. Only in 1957 the whole plot was handed over the ward of Meguro. In our days it represents a particularly gorgeous example for a stately home in the early years of the Shōwa era (1926-1989).

Opening hours:

Daily, except on Mondays, from 9 am to 4.30 pm (Japanese building until 4 pm).
Should Monday be a public holiday, the buildings stay closed on following weekday instead.
Also closed during the New Year holidays.

Please observe: The Western style main building has been undergoing extensive restoration works since 1 July 2016 that are excepted to take until September 2018. During these efforts the building cannot be entered.
The pictures you can see here were taken about four weeks prior to the restoration works – you’ll probably agree with me: All that doesn’t look THAT much in need of refurbishment. But, obviously, the buildings did no longer comply with present requirements for crime prevention and disaster control.

How to get there:

Take the Keiō Inokashira line (京王井の頭線 / けいおういのかしらせん) to Komaba Tōdai-Mae (駒場東大前 / こまばとうだいまえ) and from there via the west exit (西口 / にしぐち) in northwestern direction to the Komaba Park (駒場公園 / こまばこうえん).

Address:

4-3-55 Komaba, Meguro-ku
Tōkyō 〒153-0041

〒153-0041東京都目黒区駒場4-3-55


Tōkyō Camii (東京ジャーミイ) (dt.)

18. September 2016

Japans größte Moschee

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Tōkyō Camii (東京ジャーミイ)

Tōkyō Camii (東京ジャーミイ)

Dass der Anblick einer Moschee in Japan zunächst einmal befremdet, darf nicht verwundern. Bis zur Zeit der Meiji-Restauration (1868) war der Islam in Japan praktisch unbekannt. Und auch heute wird man nur mit großer Mühe Japaner finden, die sich selbst als Muslime bezeichnen. Die muslimische Population Japans beschränkt sich fast ausschließlich auf aus muslimischen Ländern Zugereiste. Traditionell waren es Gastarbeiter aus Bangladesh und dem Iran, die die größte muslimische Bevölkerungsgruppe darstellten.

Eine größere muslimische Gemeinde bildete sich in Tōkyō u.a. aus denjenigen, die nach der Oktoberrevolution die junge Sowjetunion verlassen hatten – schon 1938 hatten Tataren aus Kasan eine erste Moschee in Tōkyō errichtet. Diese hatte allerdings 1986 aufgrund im Laufe der Zeit auftretender baulicher Mängel abgerissen werden müssen (andere Quellen nennen das Jahr 1985).


Das Land, auf dem die Moschee stand, wurde von der „Tōkyō Turkish Association“ der Türkischen Republik, unter der Maßgabe überschrieben, dass diese auf dem Grundstück eine neue Moschee errichtet. Und so begann man schließlich 1998 (nach dem Spatenstich am 12. April 1996) mit dem Bau der heutigen Moschee, die gleichzeitig auch die größte Japans ist und die am 30. Juni 2000 eingeweiht wurde. Auf einer Grundfläche von 734 qm befinden sich ein unterirdisches und drei oberirdische Stockwerke mit einer Gesamtfläche von 1.477 qm. Die Haupthalle mit der wuchtigen Kuppel ist über 23 Meter hoch – das schlanke Minarett nebenan fast 41,50 Meter hoch.

Die japanische Baufirma „Kajima Corporation“ (鹿島建設株式会社 / かじまけんせつかぶしきがいしゃ) errichtete die eigentlichen Strukturen des Moscheengebäudes, die Verzierungen und Kunstwerke wurden von türkischen Handwerkern und Künstlern ausgeführt (für die Fassadengestaltung wurden große Mengen feinen türkischen Marmors verwendet), wie auch das ganze Projekt des Moscheenbaus eine durchgängige Zusammenarbeit von türkischen und japanischen Fachleuten darstellte.

An die Moschee angeschlossen ist auch ein türkisches Kulturzentrum.

Wie man hinkommt:

Aus der Innenstadt Tōkyōs mit den Bahnen der Odakyū-Linie (小田急線 / おだきゅうせん) oder der Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda-Linie (東京メトロ千代田線 / とうきゅおうめとろちよだせん) nach Yoyogi Uehara (代々木上原 / よよぎうえはら) und von dort wenige Minuten in westlicher Richtung zu Fuß (Lageplan siehe unten).

Adresse:

Tōkyō Chami & Turkish Culture Center
1-19 Ōyama-chō
Shibuya-ku
Tōkyō 151-0065

東京ジャーミー・トルコ文化センター
151-0065 東京都渋谷区大山町1-19

Besondere Regeln für den Besuch der Moschee:

  • Sowohl Männer als auch Frauen sollten ordentliche Kleidung tragen.
  • Von Frauen wird erwartet, dass sie knöchellange Röcke oder Hosen tragen, nichts eng Anliegendes oder Durchscheinendes, desweiteren Oberteile mit langen Ärmeln und hoch geschlossenem Kragen.
  • Von Frauen wird obendrein das Tragen eines Kopftuches erwartet.
  • Für Männer sind kurze Hosen nicht statthaft.
  • Für Gruppen von fünf oder mehr Personen ist ein Anmeldeformular auszufüllen.
  • Vor dem Betreten der Gebetshalle sind die Schuhe auszuziehen und vor der Halle in Regalen zu deponieren.
  • Es wird um ruhiges Verhalten in der Gebetshalle gebeten.
  • Für Fotografien oder Videoaufnahmen jeglicher Art in der Moschee ist vorher eine Erlaubnis der Verwaltung einzuholen.
  • Es darf den Gebeten beigewohnt werden – hierfür sind Plätze im rückwärtigen Teil der Gebetshalle einzunehmen – Herumlaufen ist nicht gestattet.
  • Die obere Etage ist Frauen vorbehalten.
  • Haustiere sind im Innern der Gebetshalle nicht erlaubt.

Googlemaps:


Die ehemalige Residenz der Maeda (旧前田家本邸)

16. September 2016

Stilvolle Schlichtheit & repräsentativer Prunk

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Die meist schon in der Meiji-Zeit (1868-1912) entstandenen westlichen Prunkvillen Tōkyōs gehören völlig zurecht zu den wichtigsten Sehenswürdigkeiten, da sie als Repräsentanten dieser Zeit das damalige Lebensgefühl der oberen Zehntausend (d.h. in diesem Falle waren es wohl die „oberen Tausend“) verkörpern.
Als Beispiele seien hier erwähnt, die ehemalige Residenz der Familie Iwasaki (旧岩崎邸 / いわさきてい), der Gründer des Mitsubishi-Konzerns und die Villa des Toranosuke Furukawa (古河虎之助 / ふるかわとらのすけ) im gleichnamigen Garten (旧古河庭園 / きゅうふるかわていえん) – beide von dem von mir nicht sonderlich geschätzten britischen Architekten Josiah Conder gebaut. Es gab in Tōkyō natürlich noch mehrere Repräsentationsbauten dieser Art, aber der überwiegende Teil von ihnen fiel entweder dem großen Erdbeben von 1923 zum Opfer oder dem US-amerikanischen Bombardement im 2. Weltkrieg.

Ein besonders stattliches Ensemble hat (wie zum Beispiel auch das herrliche Gebäude des Teien Kunstmuseums) die Gnade gehabt, erst nach dem großen Erdbeben von 1923 errichtet worden zu sein – und dann auch noch die Heimsuchungen des letzten Weltkrieges überstanden zu haben: Die ehemalige Residenz der Maeda (旧前田家本邸 / きゅうまえだけほんてい) in Komaba (駒場 / こまば) in Tōkyōs Meguro Bezirk (目黒区 / めぐろ).

Bauherr dieser Residenz war Toshinari Maeda (前田利為 / まえだとしなり). Und sein Werdegang soll hier kurz beschrieben werden:

Er wurde am 5. Juni 1885 als fünfter Sohn eines ehemaligen Daimyō Toshiaki Maeda (前田利昭 / まえだとしあき) des Nanokaichi-Lehens (七日市藩 / なのかいちはん) – in der heutigen Präfektur Gunma (群馬県 / ぐんまけん) gelegen – geboren und gehörte damit ursprünglich einer Seitenlinie der Maeda an. Er wurde allerdings bereits im Jahre 1900 von der Hauptlinie der Maeda adoptiert, um diese als Haupterbe fortzusetzen – am 13. Juni 1900 wurde er Marquis und damit der 16. Chef des Maeda-Clans. Wie üblich in diese Kreisen, absolvierte er seinen Dienst im Oberhaus des japanischen Parlaments, während er seine Militärkarriere verfolgte. Er machte 1911 seinen Abschluss an der Militärakademie und hatte sich schon zu dieser Zeit als herausragender Student erwiesen (weswegen er u.a. mit dem „kaiserlichen Schwert“ ausgezeichnet wurde). Seine militärischen Studien setze er 1913 in Deutschland fort und ging von dort nach Großbritannien. Im August 1923 wurde er Bataillonskommandeur im 4. Regiment der kaiserlichen Garde Japans und diente von 1927 bis 1930 als Militärattaché in Großbritannien, bevor er Kommandeur des 2. Regiments der kaiserlichen Garde wurde. Später stand er der Militärakademie vor und wurde zum Generalleutnant befördert, bevor er im Januar 1939 aus seinem aktiven Dienst ausschied.
Sein Können war allerdings im pazifischen Krieg wieder gefragt, als man ihm im April 1942 die Leitung des Kriegsschauplatzes Borneo übertrug, wo er bei einem Flugzeugabsturz im September desselben Jahres ums Leben kam. Erst posthum erlangte er den Rang eines Generals.

Soviel zur Person. Den Bau seines Anwesens in Komaba, hatte er offensichtlich noch während seines Dienstes als Militärattaché in Großbritannien in Auftrag gegeben, denn der größere der beiden Gebäudekomplexe (der im westlichen Stil) wurde bereits 1929 fertiggestellt – der kleinere im japanischen Stil ein Jahr später.

Hier ein paar Kerndaten zu den Gebäuden:

Residenz im westlichen Stil:

  • Stahlbetonkonstruktion des Architekten Yasushi Tsukamoto (塚本靖 / つかもとやすし) in einer Art „Tudor-Stil“ mit drei überirdischen Stockwerken und einem Kellergeschoss.
  • Grundfläche des Gebäudes: 1.129,44 m²
  • Gesamte Wohn- und Nutzfläche: 2.930,96 m².

Die Räumlichkeiten im Erdgeschoss:

Der Treppenaufgang zum Obergeschoss:

Die Räumlichkeiten im Obergeschoss:

Residenz im japanischen Stil:

  • Holzkonstruktion mit zwei oberirdischen Stockwerken und vergleichsweise hohen Räumen.
  • Grundfläche des Gebäudes: 353,89 m²
  • Gesamte Wohn- und Nutzfläche: 456,68 m²
  • Leichte Dachabdeckung aus einer Kombination aus breiten, konkaven und halb-runden, konvexen Dachpfannen und kupfernen Regenrinnen.

Die Gebäude sind auch Ausdruck des persönlichen Geschmacks Maedas, der sich in den Jahren in Großbritannien an die Vorzüge westlicher Wohnkultur gewöhnt hatte. Das zusätzliche Gebäude im japanischen Stil wurde in erster Linie zu dem Zweck errichtet, darin ausländische Ehrengäste zu bewirten und unterzubringen.

Im Hauptgebäude waren lediglich die Räume für das Dienstpersonal traditionell japanisch eingerichtet – mit Tatami ausgelegte Räume – und entsprechend schlicht.

Räume des Dienstpersonals im Obergeschoss des westlichen Hauptgebäudes:

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Maeda Residence (旧前田家本邸)

Die Räumlichkeiten der Familie Maeda bestachen allesamt durch Großzügigkeit, hohe Decken und zweckmäßige, hochwertige und moderne Möblierung (leider sind die meisten der Möbelstücke heute nur noch auf Fotografien aus alten Tagen zu sehen), während im japanischen Gebäude auch zu Maedas Zeiten schon die Räume praktisch unmöbliert geblieben waren – wie sich das nun mal für einen reinen japanischen Wohnstil gebietet.

Ursprünglich hatte es auf dem Gelände des Parks noch weitere Gebäude sowie ein Gewächshaus gegeben, aber diese sind heute nicht mehr erhalten.

Nach dem Ende des 2. Weltkriegs wurde Gebäude durch General MacArthur (der sich mit dem bescheidenen Titel „Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers“ zieren durfte) requiriert, um hier die Residenz für General Ennis Whitehead, den Kommandeur der 5. Air Force, einzurichten. Erst 1957 wurde der Komplex an den Stadtbezirk Meguro übergeben. Und heute bildet die Anlage ein überaus prächtiges Beispiel herrschaftlichen Wohnkomforts in der frühen Shōwa-Zeit (1926-1989).

Öffnungszeiten:

Täglich außer montags von 9.00 Uhr bis 16.30 Uhr (japanisches Gebäude bis 16 Uhr)
Fällt ein Feiertag auf Montag, bleibt das Gebäude stattdessen am darauffolgenden Werktag geschlossen.
Ebenfalls geschlossen während der Neujahrsfeiertage.

Bitte beachten Sie: Das große Hauptgebäude im westlichen Stil wird seit dem 1. Juli 2016 umfassenden Restaurierungsarbeiten unterzogen, die sich voraussichtlich bis September 2018 hinziehen werden. In dieser Zeit kann das Gebäude nicht betreten werden.
Die Bilder, die Sie hier sehen können, wurden knapp vier Wochen vor der Schließung gemacht – wahrscheinlich werden Sie mir zustimmen: Sooo renovierungsbedürftig sieht das Gebäude eigentlich gar nicht aus. Aber offensichtlich entsprach es eben nicht mehr den heutigen Standards für Katastrophenschutz und Verbrechensverhütung.

Wie man hinkommt:

Mit der Keiō Inokashira-Linie (京王井の頭線 / けいおういのかしらせん) nach Komaba Tōdai-Mae (駒場東大前 / こまばとうだいまえ) und von dort über den Westausgang (西口 / にしぐち) in nordwestlicher Richtung zum Komaba Park (駒場公園 / こまばこうえん).

Adresse:

4-3-55 Komaba, Meguro-ku
Tōkyō 〒153-0041

〒153-0041東京都目黒区駒場4-3-55


Tsukuda – Ōkawabata River City 21 (佃・大川端リバーシティ21) (Engl.)

9. September 2016

Earliest Land Reclamation & Recession Control by Concrete

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

Ōkawabata River City 21 (大川端リバーシティ21)

Ōkawabata River City 21 (大川端リバーシティ21)

Very well then, I admit it: The subtitle of this posting may cause some confusion. But who knows – maybe that’s just the way I want it to be… After all, Tōkyō is the city of contradictions, where the coexistence of new and old seems inevitable, as these contradictions just arise by nature.

And here is another very pretty example: The northern edge of the man-made island of Tsukishima (月島 / つきしま) – created during the Meiji era (1868 to 1912) and completed in 1892 already. I’ve reported about this island before:

Moon Island, a Shout of Victory and Sunny Sea
Tsukishima, Kachidoki and Harumi
– 
The “older ones“ among Tōkyō’s man-made islands

The northern corner of the island, called Tsukuda (佃 / つくだ) (which stands for “cultivated rice field” in the original meaning of the Chinese character) is yet another 250 years older.

Tsukuda (佃)

Tsukuda (佃)

At that time fishermen from Ōsaka (大阪 / おおさか) started to create an island in the mudflat of the river. Oldest evidence of these days is the Sumiyoshi Jinja (住吉神社 / すみよしじんじゃ), the Shintō shrine that was built in 1646 in order to protect the island. Of the shrine’s buildings that can be seen today, the impressive Haiden (prayer hall) is the oldest – it dates back to 1870.

On two sides (the Eastern and the Northern one) the shrine is enclosed by a channel that gives us an impression of the dimensions of the old time’s island. While the channel and its dreamy fisher boats form a harmonious ensemble with the narrow alleys of the residential neigbourhoods, the contrast the high-rise buildings in the back that were built in practically no time in the very late 20th century, couldn’t be sharper.

The residence towers of the “Ōkawabata River City 21” (大川端リバーシティ21) were, when they began to built the first one, der “River Point Tower” (リバーポイントタワー) in 1986, indeed a project aiming at trendsetting urban housing for the future – at least for those who could afford such a futuristic way of living (even in our days, apartments in these towers are – even for Tōkyō’s standards – rather costly). Today this first tower is among the smaller onese in the ensemble with its 40 stories or a height of 132 metres respectively. Nevertheless, with its 390 housing units it could accommodate a medium-sized village.

The tallest of the buildings is the “Century Park Tower” (センチュリーパークタワー), that was built between 1995 and 1999, with a height of 180 metres, containing as many as 756 housing units. It is, therefore, the 18th tallest apartment building in Japan today.

For comparison:
At present, the highest apartment tower of Japan, the “Kitahama” (北浜 / きたはま) in Ōsaka (大阪 / おおさか) is 209 metres tall; the two biggest and tallest ones in Tōkyō, “The Tōkyō Towers” are each 194 metres tall and provide space for – believe it or not – 2,794 apartment units.

The construction period of the last of the eight residential towers, however, marks a time in Japanese economy, when one of the first attempts was made to perform “recession control by concrete”. Since the economic and real estate bubble burst around the year 1990, concrete has repeatedly (and mostly not too successfully) been the “instrument” to boost the economy. That is one of the reasons why modern Japan is so rich in fascinating specimen of modern architecture – but also of landscapes and sights that have been mutilated by concrete.

Aside from the apartment towers, the recreational areas around them, that make use of structures dating back to the Edo period, are the attractions of the compound. And, certainly, the view from the north shores of the island is one of the most striking in the city. This northern edge of the island is – very romantically – called “Place de Paris“ (パリ広場 / ぱりひろば) – even though it may require some imagination to  discover the romantic aspects of the square.

Naturally, this rather newly created settlement area provides everything needed for daily life: shops, restaurants, sports-  and recreational facilities.

Suggestion: Have a stroll through the small alleys of the old part of town around the channel and the shrine!

And should you feel your feet deserve a special treat after all that walking around, take a little detour to the Japanese style garden on the south side of the sky scrapers, on the northern bank of the channel and the Sumiyoshi Jinja.

How to get there:

The easiest way is by Tōkyō Metro Hibiya-Linie (東京メトロ日比谷線 / とうきょうめとろひびやせん) or Toei Subway Ōedo-Linie (都営地下鉄大江戸線 / とえいちかてつおおえどせん) respectively to Tsukishima (月島 / つきしま). Take exit 6 (which also has an elevator) and head in northern directions, passing the Sumiyoshi Jinja (住吉神社 / すみよしじんじゃ).


Arrival and Immigration Procedures/Ankunft und Einreise-Prozedur (updated)

7. September 2016

(Der englische Text folgt dem deutschen)
(English text follows the German text)

Der zwar beliebteste, aber sicher auch langweiligste Artikel auf dieser Seite bedarf mal wieder einer Überarbeitung, nachdem die “Ausreisekarte” für in Japan lebende Ausländer erneut überarbeitet wurde und hier der Vollständigkeit erwähnt und wiedergegeben werden soll, auch wenn sie für die meisten Besucher Japans irrelevant sein dürfte. Hier ist sie:

Disembarcation Card for Reentrant (Vorderseite/front)

Disembarcation Card for Reentrant (Vorderseite/front)

Disembarcatio Card for Reentrant (Rückseite/back)

Disembarcation Card for Reentrant (Rückseite/back)

The evidently most popular – and yet the most boring – entry to this website may be the one related to the procedures for entering Japan. Again they require an update, as the “Disembarcation Card for Reentrant” (for those people holding a long-term visa for Japan and wishing to leave the country temporarily) has seen a revision. Even though most visitors of Japan won’t ever need this form, here it is – for the sake of completeness:

Disembarcation Card for Reentrant (Vorderseite/front)

Disembarcation Card for Reentrant (Vorderseite/front)

Disembarcatio Card for Reentrant (Rückseite/back)

Disembarcation Card for Reentrant (Rückseite/back)

Sehen Sie auch / see also:

Ankunft und Einreise-Prozedur / Arrival and Immigration Procedures (Engl./dt.)


Tsukuda – Ōkawabata River City 21 (佃・大川端リバーシティ21) (dt.)

7. September 2016

Früheste Landgewinnung & Rezessionsbekämpfung durch Beton

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Ōkawabata River City 21 (大川端リバーシティ21)

Ōkawabata River City 21 (大川端リバーシティ21)

Also gut, ich gebe es zu: Der Untertitel dieses Artikels vermag zu verwirren. Aber wer sagt denn, dass das nicht beabsichtigt ist? Tōkyō ist nur mal die Stadt der Widersprüche, wo das Nebeneinander von Alt und Neu bisweilen gerade so wirkt, als bestehe es nur, um einem Klischee Genüge zu tun. Tut es aber nicht! Diese nur scheinbaren Gegensätze entstehen hier auf ganz natürliche Art und Weise.

Ein schönes Beispiel hierfür ist der Nordzipfel der in der Meiji-Zeit (1868-1912) geschaffenen und schon 1892 fertiggestellten, künstlichen Insel Tsukishima (月島 / つきしま), von der ich bereits hier einmal berichtet habe:

Mondinsel, Triumphschrei und sonniges Meer
Tsukishima, Kachidoki und Harumi
– Die „älteren“ unter Tōkyōs künstlichen Inseln

Der Nordzipfel der Insel, Tsukuda (佃 / つくだ) (in seiner ursprünglichen Bedeutung steht das Schriftzeichen übrigens für „kultiviertes/bebautes Reisfeld“), ist noch mal 250 Jahre älter.

Tsukuda (佃)

Tsukuda (佃)

Seinerzeit hatten Fischer aus Ōsaka (大阪 / おおさか) im Schlick eine Insel entstehen lassen. Ältestes Zeugnis aus dieser Zeit ist der Sumiyoshi Jinja (住吉神社 / すみよしじんじゃ), der zum Schutz der neuen Insel 1646 errichtet wurde. Von den heute noch vorhandenen Gebäudeteilen ist der erstaunlich große Haiden (Gebetshalle) das wahrscheinlich älteste – es stammt aus dem Jahre 1870.

Der den Schrein auf zwei Seiten im rechten Winkel umschließende Kanal erinnert noch an die früheren Ausmaße der Insel. So harmonisch die verträumt im Kanal liegenden Fischerboote zu den engen Gassen der sie umgebenden Wohnsiedlung passen mögen, so krass ist doch auch der Kontrast, den sie zu dem Wolkenkratzerviertel bilden, das seit dem späten 20. Jahrhundert hier aus dem Boden gestampft wurde.

Die Wohntürme der „Ōkawabata River City 21“ (大川端リバーシティ21) waren, als man 1986 den Spatenstich für den ersten der Türme, den „River Point Tower“ (リバーポイントタワー), tat, der Beginn einen Bauprojektes, das zukunftsweisend sein sollte – urbanes Wohnen in einer futuristischen Form, wenn auch nur für die Betuchten unter den Bewohnern Tōkyōs (auch heute noch sind die Appartements in den Türmen – auch für Tōkyōter Verhältnisse – teuer). Der 40 Stockwerke bzw. 132 Meter hohe Turm gehört heute zu den kleineren des Ensembles. Aber immerhin bot auch er schon 390 Wohneinheiten – sprich: konnte ein mittleres Dorf beherbergen.
Das größte der Gebäude ist der 1995 begonnene und 1999 fertiggestellte „Century Park Tower“ (センチュリーパークタワー) mit einer Höhe von 180 Metern und 756 Wohneinheiten. Damit ist er auch heute noch der 18.-höchste Wohnhaus des Landes.

Zum Vergleich:
Der derzeit höchste Wohnturm, der „Kitahama“ (北浜 / きたはま) in Ōsaka (大阪 / おおさか) ist 209 Meter hoch, die beiden größten und höchsten in Tōkyō, „The Tōkyō Towers“ sind jeweils 194 Meter hoch und weisen sage und schreibe 2794 Wohneinheiten auf.

Die Bauzeit dieses letzten der insgesamt acht Wohntürme fällt allerdings auch schon in eine Zeit, als man schon versuchte, mit Beton gegen die Rezession anzubauen – seit dem Platzen der ökonomischen bzw. Immobilien-Blase um das Jahr 1990 gehört Beton zu den immer wieder, wenn auch nur mit mäßigem Erfolg, eingesetzten Mitteln zur Ankurbelung der Wirtschaft. Dadurch entstehen bisweilen die faszinierendsten Beispiele moderner Architektur, aber auch – quelle surprise – durch Beton verschandelte Landschaft.

Neben den Wohntürmen gehören die Grünanlagen, die teilweise auf alte Strukturen aus der Edo-Zeit zurückgreifen, zu den Anziehungspunkten des Areals. Und natürlich ist der Blick, der sich von der Nordspitze der Insel, die man – ganz romantisch – „Place de Paris“ (パリ広場 / ぱりひろば) getauft hat (auch wenn der Platz nur sehr eingeschränkt als „romantisch“ bezeichnet werden kann), in Richtung Norden eröffnet, sicher einer der markantesten in der Stadt.

Und natürlich bietet dieser neu erschaffene Siedlungsraum alles, was man für das tägliche Leben benötigt: Geschäfte und Restaurants, Sporteinrichtungen und Gemeinschaftsräume.

Empfehlung: Schlendern sie durch die Gassen des Wohngebiets rings um den Kanalarm um den Schrein!

Und falls Sie danach der Meinung sein sollten, Ihre Füßen hätten sich eine kleine Wohltat verdient, machen Sie doch einen kleinen Abstecher zum japanischen Garten im Süden der Wohntürme, direkt am Nordufer des Kanalarms um den Sumiyoshi Jinja gelegen.

Wie man hinkommt:

Am einfachsten mit den U-Bahnen der Tōkyō Metro Hibiya-Linie (東京メトロ日比谷線 / とうきょうめとろひびやせん) oder Toei Subway Ōedo-Linie (都営地下鉄大江戸線 / とえいちかてつおおえどせん) nach Tsukishima (月島 / つきしま) und vom dortigen Ausgang 6 (Aufzug vorhanden) in nördlicher Richtung, vorbei am Sumiyoshi Jinja (住吉神社 / すみよしじんじゃ).