Tip: New Exhibition at the Teien Art Museum (庭園美術館)

18. November 2017

Decoration never dies, anyway

Teien Art Museum – Decoration never dies, anyway

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

From November 18 this year to February 25, 2018 the Teien Art Museum (庭園美術館) is holding an exhibition of seven contemporary artists that have explored the topic of “decoration” and have integrated it into the Art Déco surrounding, the building of the Teien Art Museum is providing. Don’t miss this fascinating exhibition!

Here are some of the exhibits (the rooms in the Teien Art Museum where you can find those works of art are stated in the photos’ inscription):

Akiko und Masako Takada

The Japanese twins create from inexpensive and everyday items and transform them into suggestions of very different and often precious objects.

Kour Pour

The Los Angeles-based artist was born in Britian, where his Iranian father restored Persian carpets. He paints large and colourful canvases that look like fine antique carpets but with unexpected juxtapositions from other cultures and times.

Makiko Yamamoto

The Japanese artist draws windows of strangers’ homes, using her imagination to create lives for the people who live within. She then pulls the residents to her work, inviting them to recreate the scenes she has imagined.

Nynke Koster

This Dutch artist takes molds of interior pieces of historical buildings and creates from them furniture and decorative elements.

Wim Delvoye

The Belgian Artist borrows decorative elements from Gothic cathedrals and reworks them in intricate laser-cut steel sculptures with modern contexts. In addition the exhibition will show works from his Tyre and Suitcase series.

Yoshikazu Yamagata

The Japanese fashion designer creates art that is worn on the body but transcends the boundries of fashion.

The seventh artist of this exhibition, Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook from Thailand is represented in the Annex of the Teien Art Museum. She has created a video-installation which – for good reason – I cannot show here.

But not just because of the current, breathtaking exhibition the Teien Art Museum is a “must” for everyone who is interested in art and architecture – the building alone is worth a visit. For further information (such as opening hours and how to get there) and lots of pictures of it, have a look at the following:

Teien Art Museum (庭園美術館)
– Art Deco at its best
or: Where French savoir-vivre meets Japanese craftsmanship

Advertisements

Hinweis: Neue Ausstellung im Teien Kunstmuseum (庭園美術館)

18. November 2017

Decoration never dies, anyway

Teien Art Museum – Decoration never dies, anyway

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Das Teien Kunstmuseum (庭園美術館) bietet vom 18. November 2017 bis zum 25. Februar 2018 eine Ausstellung sieben zeitgenössischer Künstlerinnen und Künstler, die sich des Themas “Dekoration” angenommen und es in dem Art Déco-Rahmen, den das Gebäude des Teien Kunstmuseums bietet, umgesetzt haben. Lassen Sie sich die faszinierende Ausstellung nicht entgehen!

Hier ein paar Beispiele der Exponate (die Räume, in denen Sie die Ausstellungsstücke finden sind jeweils in der Bildbeschriftung vermerkt):

Akiko und Masako Takada

Das japanische Zwillingspaar kreiert seine Kunst aus Gegenständen des Alltags und verwandelt sie in kostbar erscheinende Kunstwerke.

Kour Pour

Der Vater des in Los Angeles lebenden, britischen Künstlers war Iraner, der sich mit der Restauration persischer Teppiche beschäftigte – und aus diesem Kulturkreis bezieht Kour Pour seine Inspirationen; seine Kunstwerke sehen auf den ersten Blick wie Teppiche aus – aber schauen Sie sie sich näher an – sie stellen Zeichen und Elemente aus den unterschiedlichsten Kulturkreisen einander gegenüber.

Makiko Yamamoto

Die Japanerin zeichnet die Fenster von fremden Häusern und stellt sich dabei das Leben, das hinter diesen Fenstern gelebt wird, vor. Anhand dieser Zeichnungen bittet sie diejenigen, die tatsächlich hinter diesen Fenstern leben oder arbeiten, ihre Inspiration “nachzustellen”.

Nynke Koster

Die niederländische Künstlerin nimmt Gummi-Abdrücke von Teilen historischer Gebäude und verwandelt diese Abdrücke in Möbelstücke oder Dekoration.

Wim Delvoye

Der belgische Künstler transformiert Elemente gotischer Kathedralen in Gegenstände gänzlich unerwarteter Form. Außerdem sind in der Ausstellung Teile seiner Serien “verwandelter” Reifen und Koffer zu sehen.

Yoshikazu Yamagata

Der japanische Modedesigner kreiert “tragbare Kunst”, die aber die Ketten der Mode sprengt.

Die siebte Künstlerin, deren Werk Sie im Annex finden können, die Thailänderin Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook, ist mit einer Videoinstallation vertreten, die ich hier aus verständlichen Gründen nicht abbilden kann.

Aber natürlich ist das Teien Kunstmuseum nicht nur aktueller Ausstellungen wegen ein Muss für jeden, der sich für Kunst und/oder Architektur interessiert, sondern schon allein des Gebäudes wegen. Für weitere, reich bebilderte Informationen zum Museumsgebäude selbst, aber auch zu den Öffnungszeiten und den Anfahrtswegen, schauen Sie doch einmal hier vorbei:

Teien Kunstmuseum (庭園美術館)
– Art Déco vom Feinsten
Oder: Wo französische Lebensart auf japanische Handwerkskunst trifft


Nezu Museum (根津美術館) (Engl.)

15. November 2017

Pinnacle of Elegance (鏨の華)
– Sword Fittings of the Mitsumura Collection (光村利藻)
(1877 – 1955)

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

Please click the images of this posting to enlarge them.

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

When thinking of swords, many people in the West may initially think of murder weapons – or, with a less offensive mind, of defensive weapons. The European days when swords and rapiers were carried for more “decorative” purposes or to indicate a social rank, are long gone.

It’s a bit different in Japan, where only in 1876 an imperial decree prohibited carrying swords in public – even the samurai lost their right to wear a sword (katana) in public along with the right to execute commoners who paid them disrespect. However, during the two centuries before, during the so-called “Edo period” (1603-1868), a basically peaceful time in Japanese history, swords had already become rather a symbol of masterly craftsmanship and blacksmithing. And even today: Nobody who ever worked with a knife made of folded steel will be happy with common kitchen knives.

Often it is forgotten that the art of creating a sword doesn’t stop with forging a magnificent blade, also not with a gorgeously decorated sheath and the status it gives its bearer. The sword fittings are usually just as artful as the rest of the tool – first of all the sword guards. And some of the most beautiful examples of this art can now (3 November 2017 to 17 December 2017) be seen at the Nezu Museum (根津美術館 / ねづびじゅつかん), representing the core of a collection of the founder of the “Mitsumura Printing Company” (光村印刷株式会社), Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻 / みつむらとしも) – one of the most important (if not the most important) and most comprehensive collections of its kind. It is regarded as one of the two largest collections of swords and sword fittings.

Nezu Museum (根津美術館): Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻)

Nezu Museum (根津美術館): Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻)

Originally the collections comprised about 3,000 works of art, which Toshimo Mitsumura had collected in a fairly short period of time (from 1897 to 1907). In order to prevent that those precious items vanished to overseas (where even then a keen interest in Japanese swords existed) in an uncontrolled fashion, Kaichirō Nezu (根津 嘉一郎 / ねづかいちろう) (1860 – 1940) took over the complete collection in 1909. In our days, the remaining 1,200 parts form one of the most important collctions of the Nezu Museum.

Let us have a look at the present exhibition (the numbers of the exhibits are following the numbering during the current exhibition – not the numbering applied in the exhibition catalogue).

Section 1
A Remarkable Sword Fittings Collection

#17
Pair of Sword Fitting Sets with Millet Design
Artist: Tōmei Araki (荒き東明) (1817-1870)
Edo era, 19th century (private colleciton)

Tōmei Araki was a fittings maker from Kyōto. He devised a technique of carving realistic looking millets in gold. These pieces are outstanding examples with the gold millets accentuated by the jet-black “shakudō” (赤銅 / しゃくどう), a copper-gold alloy.

#22
Pair of Collar and Pommels with Phoenix and Qilin Design
Artist: Nagatake Imai (今井永武) (1812-1882)
Edo era, 1857 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Have a look at the fine detail revealed under the magnifying glass.

#25
Sword Guard with Stream and Carp Design
Important Art Object
Artist: Yashuchika Tsuchiya (土屋安親) (1670-1744)
Edo era, 18th century (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Yasuchika Tsuchiya, along with Toshinaga Nara and Jōi Sugiura, are known as the three master fitting makers of the mid Edo period. This iron ground sword guard features a scene of a carp, carved in sukidashi, swimming against the current.

#27
Set of Two Sword Fittings with Sleeping “Hotei”-Design
Important Cultures Property
Artist: Sōmin Yokoya (横谷宗珉) (1670-1733)
Edo era, 17th – 18th century (private collection)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Sōmin Yokoyas liked to create designs that broke with tradition, and introduced a new style to the fitting world. These tiny sword hilt ornaments show adorable depictions of “Hotei” peeping out from a bag (furoshiki), and the detail shown under the magnifying glass is amazing.

#29
Sword Guard with Rooster Playing on Drum Design
Artist: Nanpo Kikukawa (菊川南甫)
Edo era, 18th – 19th century (Nezu Museum)

#36
Pair of Sword Guards with Confucius and Followers Design
Artist: Tomoyoshi Hitotsuzanagi (一柳友善)
Edo era, 1825/1826 (Nezu Museum)

#44
Swort Hilt Ornament with Racoon (tanuki) Design
Artist: Tsuneyo Yabu (藪常代)
Edo era, 19th century (private collection)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

#52
Swort Hilt Ornament with Demon and Kshitigarbha Design
Artist: Mitsuhiro Ōtsuki (大月光弘)
Edo era, 19th century (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Normally, terrible demons would be exorcised by a monk reciting a Buddhist prayer. However, this swort hilt ornament depicts a demon who has been homorously dressed as a monk and is even reciting the Buddhist prayer. On the back of the sword you can see Kshitigarbha (Bodhisattva), wearing a lotus leaf on his head and playing the flute.
While the demon is made from iron, the Ksitigarbha is made from a copper-gold alloy called “shakudō” (赤銅 / しゃくどう).
The tiny details make the work of art look larger than it actually is.

#57
Pair of Sword Guards with Zhongkui and Demon Design
Artist: Gassan Matsuo (松尾月山) (1815-1875)
Edo era, 19th century (Nezu Museum)

When these two sword guards are placed together, they tell the story of Zhongkui (on the large sword guard) chasing a demon (on the small one). The design does not conform to the rules of sword guard making as it is made for apprectiaton only. It is said that the maker had a carefree personality, and did not pay heed to trivial things.

#69
Short Sword (wakizashi)
Artist: Hiromitsu (廣光)
Nanboku-chō-era, 14th century (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Hiromitsu’s swords are wide without a ridgeline, and have a uniquely hardened edge pattern. It is said that Hiromitsu was a student of the master smith Masamune when he was in his late years, and it is thought that he refined the large undulating wave hardened edge pattern of his master.

Section 2
Publishing and Exhibition

#76
Pair of Sword Fitting Sets with Desecenting Buddha and Bodhisatvas Design
Important Cultural Property
Artist: Ichijō Gotō (後藤一乗) (1791-1876)
Edo era, 1824/1825 (private collection)

This masterpiece pair of matching sword guards feature a Bodhisatva who welcomes the dying. The red base plate is a kind of copper called “hiiro-dō” (緋色銅 / ひいろどう) (scarlet copper). Mitsumura selected this work which belonged to a wealthy family to appear on the first page of volume one of “Tagane no Hana” (one of his most famous publications). This tells us that Mitsumura edited the book objectively without any personal preference.

#86
Sword Guard with Zhang Guolao-Design
Artist: Yasuchika Tsuchiya (土屋安親) (1670-1744)
Edo era, 18th century (The Japanese Swords Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

This sword guard is from the Kiyonaka Kuroda collection and was published in volume 4 of “Tagane no Hana” by Mitsumura. The soft facial expression of Zhang Guolao is evenidence of Tsuchiya’s workmanship.

#107
Woodblock print (Ukiyo-e) – Reproduction of a Classical Masterpiece
Artists: Tetsunosuke Tamura (田村鉄之助), Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻)
Meiji era, 1904

Mitsumura was requested by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to display at the World Exposition in St. Louis (USA) in 1904. He decided on a bold project to proudly present Japan’s woodblock printing technology by reproducing a large size classical masterpiece painting in actual size. The painting selected for the task was the National Treasure 12th century masterpiece painting of the Ninna-ji in Kyōto. Twenty-two cherry woodblocks make a total of fourty-three printing blocks, carved from actual size photographs of the painting.

Section 3
Toshimo Mitsumura: Patron of Arts

After wearing swords in public became illegal according to an imperial edict in 1876, sword related crafts got into a decline. Many craftsmen turned to other crafts, like jewelry and ornaments, and some of the sword and fittings making techniques were lost. As soon as at the end of the 19th century there were only a few masters left in this craft. During this time Mitsumura began to compile his collections. Like no other he understood the importance of preserving the art of forging blades and creating beautiful fittings. That is why he also supported the craftsmen wherever he could – mostly by ordering replicas of classic works. This way, he was also able to enrich his own collections with particularly artful specimen.

#124
Storage Cabinet for Small Knife Handles
Artist: Takachi Yanai (柳井多吉) (1848?-1920)
Meiji era, 1887-1906 (private collection)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

This storage cabinet hold a tolal of sixty decorative knife handles (six in each of the ten drawers). It is said that, because of the huge number of special boxes that Mitsumura ordered for his whole collection, the woodworker, Takichi Yanai, was rarely able to return to his home in Himeji for then years.

#131
Sword (katana)
Artist: Sadakazu Gassan (月山貞一)
Meiji era, 1905 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

According to the inscription, the sword was commissioned by Mitsumura in 1905, when Japan was celebrating its victory at Port Arthur. It has a carving of a kurikara dragon on the front, and Acalanatha and his attendants on the reverse. The blade is the culmination of Gassan’s skill and strength. The exquisite wavy pattern of the hardened edge is in the style of Masamune, the master smith of the 14th century. The year after this blade was made, Gassan was designated as an Imperial Craftsman.

#132
Sword (tachi)
Artist: Yasumitsu (康光)
Muromachi ega, 15th century (Sen-oku Hakuko Kan)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

The smiths of Osafune village in Bizen province (present day Okayama prefecture) were the most dynamic force of the Kamakura to Muromachi eras (12th to 16th century). The “tachi”-blades of this era display a shape that began to show a noticeabel curvature in the upper part of the blade.

#135
Pair of Sword Mountings with Rice Sheaves and Wild Goose Design in Makie Lacquer
Above: Artist of the metalwork: Hidekuni Kawarabayashi (川原林秀国) (1825-1891)
Below: Artist of the metalwork: Gassan Matsuo (松尾月山) (1791-1876) and others
Edo era, 19th century (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

The scabbard of the long sword has a ishime (stone design) ground with rice plants design, and agricultural theme fittings. The short swort mounting has scenes of pine forest and a large depiction of a flying goose.
As a pair, the mountings are a combination of symbols of autum. The hilts are wrapped in blue lacquered deer skin.

#139
Short swoard (wakizashi) in Silver with Mounting with Wave Design in Makie Lacquer
Artist: Sword: Takao Ikeda (池田隆雄) (1850?-1933)
Artists: metalwork: Mitsuyoshi Gotō (後藤光美), Tokuoki Sasayama (篠山篤興), Sōmin Yokoya (横谷宗珉), Nagatsune Ichinomiya (一宮長常) and others
Meiji era, ca. 1905 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

It appears that Mitsumura would select favorite fittings from his collection, and then have them assembled on a newly ordered set of mountings. This luxury set of mountings in particular was a favorite of his.

#140
Sword- (katana) -Mounting with Chrysanthemum Design in Makie Lacquer (with Silver Sword)
Artist: Silver Sword: Takao Ikeda (池田隆雄) (1850?-1933)
Artist: Metalwork: Shōmin Unno (海野勝珉) (1844-1915) (scabbard) and Hidekuni Kawarabayashi (川原林秀国) (1825-1891) (mounting)
Meiji era, ca. 1905 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

The silver blade has an engraving of a poem by Prince Naruhito (1818-1842). The meaning of the poem has been illustrated in an opulent chrysanthemum design on the scabbard and matching fittings.

And should have this small variety of exhibits have roused your interest, have a look for yourself! The “real” thing is always much more fascinating that some tiny pictures on a website.

Also don’t miss:

“Introductory Talk by Paul Martin”

on 10th December 2017 during which you can learn the most astonishing details about the world of samurai swords:

Nezu Museum – Samurai Style (Introductory Talk by Paul Martin)

Addresse of the Museum:

Nezu Museum
6-5-1 Minami-Aoyama
Minato-ku
Tōkyō 107-0062

₸107-0062
東京都港区南青山6-5-1
根津美術館

Opening Hours:

Closed on mondays
Open from 10 am to 5 pm (last entry at 4:30 pm).

Admission Fees:

Adults: 1.300 Yen
Students: 1.100 Yen
For groups of 20 and more people discounts are available..

And if you visit the Nezu Museum, you should definitely reserve some time for a stroll in the magnificent garden of the museum. For further details have a look here:

In the Garden of the Nezu Museum of Art (根津美術館)
– Unexpected tranquility just next to the fashion district of Minami Aoyama (南青山)


Nezu Museum (根津美術館) (dt.)

3. November 2017

Ein Gipfel der Eleganz (鏨の華)
– Beschläge und japanische Schwerter
aus der Sammlung von Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻)
(1877 – 1955)

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Klicken Sie die Bilder innerhalb dieses Artikels zum Vergrößern an.

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Bei Schwertern denkt man im Westen ja in erster Linie an Mordinstrumente – im günstigsten Falle an Verteidigungsinstrumente – die Zeiten, da man in Europa Schwerter und Degen zu mehr als dekorativen Zwecken oder zur Dokumentation des sozialen Ranges trug, sind lange vorbei.
Etwas anders war es in Japan, wo erst ein kaiserlicher Erlass aus dem Jahre 1876 das Tragen von Schwertern auch dem sogenannten Schwertadel untersagte. Aber natürlich waren Schwerter in Japan in der Edo-Zeit (1603 – 1868), einer grundsätzlich friedlichen Periode in der Geschichte des Landes, schon mehr als einfach nur Waffe. Sie waren (und sind) Gipfel handwerklichen Könnens, unerreichte Meisterwerke der Schmiedekunst – kein Mensch, der je mit einem Messer aus gefaltetem Stahl gearbeitet hat, wird sich wieder mit handelsüblicher Haushaltsware anfreunden können.

Vergessen wird oft, dass sich die Kunst der Schwertherstellung nicht nur auf die Klinge als solche beschränkt, ja selbst die oft kunstvoll verzierten Scheiden nur ein fast schon „aufdringlich“ zu nennendes Statussymbol darstellten. Regelrechte Kleinodien stellen die Beschläge der Schwerter dar – namentlich die Stichblätter. Und hiervon gibt es derzeit (3.11.2017 bis 17.12.2017) eine der schönsten Ausstellungen im Nezu Kunstmuseum (根津美術館 / ねづびじゅつかん) zu sehen, die die Sammlung des Gründers der „Mitsumura Printing Company“ (光村印刷株式会社), Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻 / みつむらとしも) zeigt – eine der wichtigsten, wenn nicht gar die wichtigste und umfangreichste dieses Genres. Sie zählt obendrein zu den zwei größten ihrer Art.

Nezu Museum (根津美術館): Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻)

Nezu Museum (根津美術館): Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻)

Die Sammlungen Toshimo Mitsumuras umfassten ursprünglich etwa 3.000 Kunstgegenstände, die er in der kurzen Zeit von etwa 1897 bis 1907 erworben hatte. Um zu verhindern, dass Teile der Sammlung unkontrolliert ins Ausland gelangten (wo damals schon ein großes Interesse an japanischen Schwertern bestand), übernahm Kaichirō Nezu (根津 嘉一郎 / ねづかいちろう) (1860 – 1940) dessen Sammlungen im Jahre 1909 komplett. Sie stellen heute mit verbliebenen 1.200 Teilen eine der wichtigen Sammlungen des Nezu Kunstmuseums dar.

Lassen Sie uns einen Blick in die Ausstellung werfen (die Nummerierung der einzelnen Ausstellungsstücke folgt der Nummerierung in der Ausstellung, nicht der im Ausstellungskatalog).

Abteilung 1
Eine bemerkenswerte Sammlung von Schwertern und -Monturen

#17
Ein Zweierset von Schwertbeschlägen mit Hirse-Elementen
Künstler: Tōmei Araki (荒き東明) (1817-1870)
Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert (private Sammlung)

Tōmei Araki war ein Hersteller von Montageteilen für Schwerter in Kyōto. Er hatte eine Methode erfunden, mit der sich realistisch aussehende Hirse in Gold darstellen ließ. Hier ein besonders schönes Beispiel für die „shakudō“ (赤銅 / しゃくどう) genannte Kupfer-Gold-Legierung.

#22
Ein Set bestehend aus Stellring und Knauf mit Phönix- und Kirin-Design
Künstler: Nagatake Imai (今井永武) (1812-1882)
Edo-Zeit, 1857 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Schauen Sie sich die feinen Details des Knaufs an, die hier unter der Lupe zu sehen sind.

#25
Stichblatt mit Fluss- und Karpfen-Muster
Wichtiges Kunstobjekt
Künstler: Yashuchika Tsuchiya (土屋安親) (1670-1744)
Edo-Zeit, 18. Jahrhundert (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Yasuchika Tsuchiya war, zusammen mit Toshinaga Nara und Jōi Sugiura als einer der drei großen Meister der Schwertbeschläge in der Mitte der Edo-Zeit bekannt. Hier ist das Design durch den Einsatz von goldbeschlagenen Wasserpflanzen hervorgehoben.

#27
Set bestehend aus zwei Schwert-Montageteilen mit „schlafendem Hotei“
Wichtiges Kulturgut
Künstler: Sōmin Yokoya (横谷宗珉) (1670-1733)
Edo-Zeit, 17. – 18. Jahrhundert (private Sammlung)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Sōmin Yokoyas Spezialität waren Muster, die mit Traditionen brachen und neue Stile für Beschläge und Montageteile. Diese winzigen Teile eines Montagesets für eine Schwerthalterung zeigen einen Hotei, der aus einer Stofftasche (furoshiki) herausschaut. Die Lupe offenbart die winzigen Details dieser Arbeit.

#29
Stichblatt mit Hahn auf einer Trommel
Künstler: Nanpo Kikukawa (菊川南甫)
Edo-Zeit, 18. – 19. Jahrhundert (Nezu Museum)

#36
Stichblatt-Paar mit Konfuzius und seinen Jüngern
Künstler: Tomoyoshi Hitotsuzanagi (一柳友善)
Edo-Zeit, 1825/1826 (Nezu Museum)

#44
Schwerthalterungs-Ornament mit japanischem Marderhund (tanuki)
Künstler: Tsuneyo Yabu (藪常代)
Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert (private Sammlung)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

#52
Schwerthalterungsornament mit Dämon und Kshitigarbha
Künstler: Mitsuhiro Ōtsuki (大月光弘)
Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Normalerweise würde man davon ausgehen, dass böse Geister durch Gebete von einem buddhistischen Priester ausgetrieben werden. Hier jedoch ist ein Dämon abgebildet, der auf ungewöhnliche Weise ein Priestergewand trägt, ja sogar ein Gebet rezitiert. Auf der Rückseite des Schwertes ist eine Kshitigarbha (eine Bodhisattva) zu sehen, die ein Lotosblatt auf dem Kopf trägt und Flöte spielt.
Während der Dämon aus Eisen hergestellt ist, besteht die Kshitigarbha aus der Kupfer-Gold-Legierung „shakudō“ (赤銅 / しゃくどう).
Aufgrund der winzigen Details wirken beide Figuren wesentlich größer, als sie tatsächlich sind.

#57
Stichblatt-Paar mit Zhongkui und Dämon
Künstler: Gassan Matsuo (松尾月山) (1815-1875)
Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert (Nezu Museum)

Wenn man diese beiden Stichblätter zusammenbringt, erzählen sie die Geschichte von Zhongkui (auf dem großen Stichblatt), der einen Dämonen verfolgt (auf dem kleineren Stichblatt). Da es nur als Kunstobjekt hergestellt wurde, folgt es nicht den Regeln für die Schwertherstellung – und passt insofern sehr zum Charakter des Künstlers, der einen recht sorglosen Charakter hatte und sich nicht um alltägliche Belange kümmerte.

#69
Kurzschwert (wakizashi)
Künstler: Hiromitsu (廣光)
Nanboku-chō-Zeit, 14. Jahrhundert (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Die Schwerter von Hiromitsu zeichnen sich besonders durch das Muster der gehärteten Schnittkante aus, die er angeblich vom Meisterschmied Masamune übernommen und verfeinert hat.

Abteilung 2
Veröffentlichungen und Ausstellungen

#76
Zwei Sets von Schwertmonturen mit Buddha- und Bodhisatva-Figuren
Wichtiges Kulturgut
Künstler: Ichijō Gotō (後藤一乗) (1791-1876)
Edo-Zeit, 1824/1825 (private Sammlung)

Dieses meisterhafte Set von zwei aufeinander abgestimmten Stichblättern stellt eine Bodhisatva dar, die die Sterbenden willkommen heißt. Das Basismaterial ist eine besondere Art des Kupfers, die man „hiiro-dō“ (緋色銅 / ひいろどう) (scharlachrotes Kupfer) nennt. Eine Abbildung dieser Arbeit zierte das Buch „Tagane no Hana“ von Mitsumura – obwohl er in seiner eigenen Sammlung zahllose ebenbürtige Exponate gehabt hätte. Ein Zeichen dafür, dass er sein Buch ohne persönliche Eitelkeiten zusammengestellt hat.

#86
Stichblatt mit Zhang Guolao-Design
Künstler: Yasuchika Tsuchiya (土屋安親) (1670-1744)
Edo-Zeit, 18. Jahrhundert (The Japanese Swords Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Dieses Stichblatt aus den Sammlungen von Kiyonaka Kuroda war Teil des vierten Bandes „Tagane no Hana“ von Mitsumura. Die sanften Gesichtszüge des Zhang Guolao sind ein Beweis für Tsuchiyas Können.

#107
Farbholzschnitt (Ukiyo-e) – Reproduktion eines klassischen Gemäldes in Originalgröße
Künstler: Tetsunosuke Tamura (田村鉄之助), Toshimo Mitsumura (光村利藻), 1904

Mitsumura war vom damaligen Außenministerium beauftragt worden, eine Ausstellung für die Weltausstellung in St. Louis (USA) im Jahre 1904 zusammenzustellen. Die Wahl fiel auf eine originalgetreue Nachbildung eines Nationalschatzes aus dem 12. Jahrhundert, eines Gemäldes im Ninna-ji in Kyōto. Hierzu wurden 22 Holzschnitt-Blöcke (insgesamt 43 Holzschnitte) anhand von Fotografien in Originalgröße des Originalkunstwerks hergestellt.

Abteilung 3
Toshimo Mitsumura: Kunstmäzen

Nachdem das Tragen von Schwertern in der Öffentlichkeit im Jahre 1876 gesetzlich verboten worden war, ließ verständlicherweise auch die Nachfrage nach Schwertern und Schwertmonturen drastisch nach. Viele der in diesem Handwerk Beschäftigten, waren gezwungen, sich anderen Betätigungsfeldern zuzuwenden, der Herstellung von Schmuck oder Ornamenten. Schon gegen Ende des Jahrhunderts gab es kaum noch Meister, die sich auf die hohe Kunst der Schwert- und Schwertbeschlags-Herstellung verstanden.
In dieser Zeit hatte Mitsumura begonnen, seine Sammlungen zu erwerben. Wie kaum ein zweiter verstand er die Wichtigkeit der mit der Schwerherstellung einhergehenden Fertigkeiten. Deswegen unterstützte er die Meister, wo immer er nur konnte – in erster Linie, indem er Reproduktionen klassischer Arbeiten bestellte. Auf diese Weise konnte er seine Sammlungen natürlich auch um zahlreiche besonders kunstvolle Stücke bereichern.

#124
Aufbewahrungsschränkchen für Griffe kleiner Messer
Künstler: Takachi Yanai (柳井多吉) (1848?-1920)
Meiji-Zeit, 1887-1906 (private Sammlung)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Dieses Schränkchen enthält insgesamt 60 dekorative Griffe für kleinere Messer (jeweils zehn in sechs Schubladen). Man erzählt sich, dass der Zimmermann Takichi Yanai zehn Jahre lang nicht in seine Heimat in Himeji zurückkehren konnte, weil Mitsumura ihn mit der Herstellung einer so großen Anzahl an Spezialbehältnissen beauftragt hatte.

#131
Schwert (katana)
Künstler: Sadakazu Gassan (月山貞一)
Meiji-Zeit, 1905 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Die Inschrift des Schwertes verrät, dass es 1905 von Mitsumura in Auftrag gegeben wurde, als Japan seinen Sieg von Port Arthur feierte. Die Vorderseite wird von einem kukikara-Drachen verziert, die Rückseite von Acalantha und seinen Dienern. Die Klinge stellte den Höhepunkt von Gassans Können dar, referenziert aber gleichzeitig in das Werk des großen Schmiedemeisters Masamune (14. Jahrhundert). Ein Jahr nach Fertigstellung dieser Klinge wurde Gassan in den Rang eines „Kaiserlichen Meisters“ erhoben.

#132
Schwert (tachi)
Künstler: Yasumitsu (康光)
Muromachi-Zeit, 15. Jahrhundert (Sen-oku Hakuko Kan)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Die Schmiede in der Bizen-Provinz (heute Präfektur Okayama) gehörten zu den treibenden Kräften in der Kamakura- und Muromachi-Zeit (12. bis 16. Jahrhundert). Die „tachi“-Klingen dieser Zeit beginnen eine ausgeprägte Krümmung im oberen Teil aufzuweisen.

#135
Ein Zweierset von Schwertmonturen mit Reis-Ähren und Wildgänsen in Makie-Lack
Oben: Künstler der Metalarbeiten: Hidekuni Kawarabayashi (川原林秀国) (1825-1891)
Unten: Künstler der Metalarbeiten: Gassan Matsuo (松尾月山) (1791-1876) und andere
Edo-Zeit, 19. Jahrhundert (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Die Scheide des Langschwertes zeigt Reis-Muster auf einem Steinmuster-Untergrund, die Monturen zeigen landwirtschaftliche Elemente.
Die Monturen des Kurzschwertes sind mir Kiefernwald-Elementen und einer fliegenden Gans verziert. Als Set stellen sie eine Kombination von Herbst-Symbolen darf. Die Griffe sind mit blauem, lackiertem Hirschleder umwickelt.

#139
Kurzschwert (wakizashi) in Silber mit Monturen mit Wellen-Muster in Makie-Lack
Künstler: Schwer: Takao Ikeda (池田隆雄) (1850?-1933)
Künstler: Metallarbeiten: Mitsuyoshi Gotō (後藤光美), Tokuoki Sasayama (篠山篤興), Sōmin Yokoya (横谷宗珉), Nagatsune Ichinomiya (一宮長常) und andere
Meiji-Zeit, ca. 1905 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Offensichtlich hat Toshimo Mitsumura seine Lieblingsstücke aus seinen Sammlungen ausgewählt und mit neuen Montagen versehen lassen. Dieses besonders aufwändige Set gehörte zu seinen Lieblingsexponaten.

#140
Montur für ein Schwert (katana) mit Chrysanthemen in Makie-Lack (mit Silberschwert)
Künstler: Silberschwert: Takao Ikeda (池田隆雄) (1850?-1933)
Künstler: Metallarbeiten: Shōmin Unno (海野勝珉) (1844-1915) (Scheide) und Hidekuni Kawarabayashi (川原林秀国) (1825-1891) (Monturen)
Meiji-Zeit, ca. 1905 (Nezu Museum)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Nezu Museum: Pinnacle of Elegance (根津美術館・鏨の華)

Die Silberklinge (hier nicht zu sehen) ist mit einem Gedicht des Prinzen Naruhito (1818-1842) verziert, dessen Bedeutung seine Umsetzung in dem opulenten Chrysanthemenmuster auf der Scheide findet.

Und falls Sie diese kleine Auswahl an Ausstellungsstücken neugierig gemacht haben sollte, schauen Sie doch selbst einmal vorbei! Die “echten” Kunstwerke werden Sie noch viel mehr faszinierten. Und verpassen Sie nicht den

“Introductory Talk by Paul Martin”

bei dem Sie am 10. Dezember 2017 Erstaunliches und Wissenwertes über die Welt der Samurai-Schwerter erfahren können:

Nezu Museum – Samurai Style (Introductory Talk by Paul Martin)

Adresse des Museums:

Nezu Kunstmuseum
6-5-1 Minami-Aoyama
Minato-ku
Tōkyō 107-0062

₸107-0062
東京都港区南青山6-5-1
根津美術館

Öffnungszeiten:

Montags geschlossen
Geöffnet von 10 Uhr bis 17 Uhr (letzter Einlass um 16.30 Uhr).

Eintrittsgelder:

Erwachsene: 1.300 Yen
Schüler: 1.100 Yen
Für Gruppen von 20 und mehr Personen werden Nachlässe gewährt.

Bei einem Besuch des Nezu Museums nehmen Sie sich unbedingt auch Zeit für den herrlichen Garten. Mehr hierzu finden Sie hier:

Im Garten des Nezu-Kunstmuseums (根津美術館)
– Unerwartete Beschaulichkeit in direkter Nachbarschaft zum Mode-Viertel von Minami Aoyama (南青山)


Shinjuku Gyoen Chrysanthemen (新宿御苑菊花壇展) (Hinweis/tip)

1. November 2017

Verpassen Sie nicht die diesjährige Ausstellung!
Don’t miss this year’s exhibition!

Wie jedes Jahr schmücken sich die kaiserlichen Gärten von Shinjuku (lies und sprich: Shinjuku Gyoen / 新宿御苑 / しんじゅくぎょえん) während der ersten beiden Wochen im November mit einer der schönsten Chrysanthemenausstellungen des Landes. Auch in diesem Jahr findet die Ausstellung vom 1. bis zum 15. November statt – wie immer in dem Teil des Parks, der im japanischen Stil gehalten ist.

Weitere Informationen und Eindrücke können Sie hier sammeln:

Chrysanthemen / Chrysanthemum Festival
– Wenn sich der Shinjuku Gyoen besonders herausputzt

Shinjuku Gyoen: Chrysanthemen (新宿御苑観菊) (Bilder/Pictures)
– Wie immer im November: Die kaiserlichste aller Blüten

As every year during the first two weeks of November, the Imperial Gardens of Shinjuku (i.e. Shinjuku Gyoen / 新宿御苑 / しんじゅくぎょえん) present one of the most beautiful chrysanthemum exhibitions of the country. Also this year the exhibition is held from November 1 to November 15 – and as always in the Japanese style part of the park.

For further information and impressions, please have a look at the following:

Chrysanthemen / Chrysanthemum Festival
– When Shinjuku Gyoen is dressing up for the occasion

Shinjuku Gyoen: Chrysanthemen (新宿御苑観菊) (Bilder/Pictures)
– As always in November: The most imperial of all flowers


U-Bahn-Etikette / Subway Etiquette – updated

18. October 2017

U-Bahn-Etikette / Subway Etiquette (10/2017)

Kampagne/Campaign 2017/2018

Seit April dieses Jahres kann man in den Stationen der Tōkyō Metro virtuelle Stempel sammeln – jeden Monat einen neuen für gutes Benehmen in den Bahnhöfen und Zügen. Wer sich in Japan nicht ganz so gut auskennt, wird sich vielleicht über das “Stempel”-Design ein bisschen wundern, aber hierzulande ist es durchaus üblich, dass man sich z.B. an Orten touristischen Interesses oder Bahnhöfen Stempelabdrücke zur Erinnerung an den Besuch machen kann.

Since April this year you can collect virtual stamps at the stations of the Tōkyō Metro – every month a different one for good manners at stations and on trains. Should you be less familiar with Japan, this “stamp” design may puzzle you a bit, but in Japan it is absolutely common to collect stamp imprints at locations like tourist attractions or train stations – as a souvenir of the visit.

Bringen Sie sich mit den Benimm-Postern der vorangegangenen Monate und Jahre mal wieder auf den neuesten Stand!
U-Bahn-Etikette / Subway Etiquette“!

Why don’t you bring yourself up to speed again by having a look at the manner posters of recent months and years?
U-Bahn-Etikette / Subway Etiquette“.


Asuka II (飛鳥II) – eine Kreuzfahrt (Teil 5)

6. October 2017

Die Heimreise

Asuka II (飛鳥II)

Abschied von Takamatsu

Nach diesem gestrafften Besichtigungsprogramm stand am Nachmittag des vierten Tages der Abschied vom Hafen von Takamatsu an, der in wirklich „klassischer“ Art und Weise über die Bühne ging. Alle, die sich am Promenadedeck des Schiffes zur Abfahrt eingefunden hatten, wurden mit bunten Luftschlangen ausgestattet, die dann hinunter zu den Besuchern auf dem Pier geworfen werden konnten. Diese hielten das Schiff dann – zumindest symbolisch – anhand dieser Streifen von der Abfahrt ab.

Natürlich haben die über 44.000 PS der Maschine der Asuka II ein leichtes Spiel gegen ein paar hundert Papierstreifen – aber ein sehenswertes Schauspiel ist das allemal.

Akashi-Kaikyō-Brücke (明石海峡大橋)

Am Abend passierten wir dann die Akashi-Kaikyō-Brücke (明石海峡大橋 / あかしかいきょうおおはし), die Kōbe (神戸 / こうべ) auf der Honshū-Seite mit Awajishima (淡路島 / あわじしま), der Insel zwischen Shikoku (四国 / しこく) und Honshū (本州 / ほんしゅう) verbindet.

Waren die Brücken, die wir zwei Tage zuvor zu sehen bekommen hatten, schon gewaltig, legt diese hier noch mal eine Schippe drauf, denn sie ist mit einer Stützweite von 1.991 Metern die längste Hängebrücke der Welt. Ursprünglich war die Spannweite „nur“ mit 1.990 Metern geplant gewesen. Während der Bauarbeiten ereignet sich aber das große Erdbeben von Kōbe (17. Januar 1995), das die Insel Awajishima fast einen Meter vom Festland entfernte – der Bauplan erfuhr also noch mal eine geringfügige Änderung. Die Stützpfeiler sind fast 300 Meter hoch. Für den Autoverkehr stehen übrigens zweimal drei Fahrspuren zur Verfügung – und im Schnitt verkehren 23.000 Fahrzeuge täglich über die Brücke.

Hachijōjima (八丈島)

Vorbei an den Inseln Hachijōjima (八丈島 / はちじょうじま) und Hachijō Kojima (八丈小島 / はちじょうこじま), die, wenngleich weit draußen im Pazifik liegend (knapp 300 km von Tōkyō entfernt) zu Tōkyō gehören, ging’s schließlich bis zum Morgen des sechsten Tages zurück nach Yokohama, wo natürlich auch das Ausschiffen genauso reibungslos über die Bühne ging, wie das bei einem japanischen Kreuzfahrtschiff erwartet werden kann.

Die komplette Kreuzfahrt auf einen Blick

Asuka II – Kreuzfahrtverlauf 11.8.-16.8.2017

Und, wie sicher war nun das Schiff?

Wie es sich für ein modernes Kreuzfahrtschiff gehört, ist die Asuka II mit den unterschiedlichsten Rettungssystemen ausgestattet – die offensichtlichsten davon möchte ich hier kurz vorstellen. Zu den Unerlässlichkeiten bei einer Kreuzfahrt gehört natürlich die Rettungsübung, die gleich nach der Abfahrt stattfand. In unserem Fall fand diese, aufgrund schlechten Wetters beim Auslaufen aus dem Hafen von Yokohama, nicht im Freien, sondern im “Club 2100” statt. Hier hatten sich die Passagiere, die sich im Ernstfall den Rettungsbooten 9 und 10 zugeteilt worden wären, zur Erklärung der Rettungsprozeduren (nur auf Japanisch!) einzufinden.

Asuka II – Seenotübung im Club 2100

Die Rettungsboote Nr. 9 und 10 gehören zu den vier größeren der Asuka II und sind auf je 150 Passagiere ausgelegt. Daneben gibt es noch einmal vier leicht kleinere Rettungsboote, die maximal 132 Passagiere aufnehmen können und zwei weitere mit einem Fassungsvermögen von je 60 Personen. Wer mitgerechnet hat, weiß: Das reicht schon mal für 1.248 Personen. Mit anderen Worten: Das reicht schon mal für alle Passagiere und den ganz überwiegenden Teil der Besatzung.

Hinzu kommen noch mindestens 12 Rettungs-Schlauchboote (ich habe die Gesamtzahl leider nicht gezählt), die auch noch einmal je 25 Personen aufnehmen können. Das macht dann also summa summarum insgesamt mindestens 1.548 Plätze auf Rettungsbooten. Außerdem stehen auf dem Promenadendeck auch noch Kisten mit zusätzlichen Schwimmwesten zur Verfügung.

An dieser Stelle wird auch klar: Wenn es wirklich um Leben und Tod geht, ist man doch nicht auf Kenntnis der japanischen Sprache angewiesen. Die Beschreibungen der Rettungseinrichtungen sind selbstverständlich zweisprachig gehalten.

Das nötige Kleingeld vorausgesetzt, sollte doch eigentlich auch dem Wasserscheuesten inzwischen die Argumente gegen eine Kreuzfahrt abhanden gekommen sein…

Sehen Sie auch die anderen Kapitel dieser Reisebeschreibung (Links werden im Laufe der anstehenden Veröffentlichungen ergänzt)

Asuka II (飛鳥II) – eine Kreuzfahrt (Teil 1)
– Das Kreuzfahrtschiff – ganz japanisch

Asuka II (飛鳥II) – eine Kreuzfahrt (Teil 2)
– Yokohama (横浜)
– Tokushima Awa Odori (徳島阿波踊り)

Asuka II (飛鳥II) – eine Kreuzfahrt (Teil 3)
– Seto Ōhashi (瀬戸大橋)
– Kurashiki (倉敷)
– Zentsū-ji (善通寺)
– Takamatsu-Feuerwerk (高松祭り花火大会)

Asuka II (飛鳥II) – eine Kreuzfahrt (Teil 4)
– Die Burg von Takamatsu (高松城)
– Ritsurin Kōen (栗林公園)