Sankei-en (三渓園) (Engl.)

11. September 2019

Classic Japan at its finest – and you don’t even have to travel to Kyōto for it

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

If you know this website, you won’t be too surprised to find places here that you would not have expected – at least not at their location. Reports about sights everybody writes about, are not this website’s prime interest. And you may also have realised that the author does not have a particular soft spot for Kyōto.

Hence, the Sankei-en (三渓園 / さんけいえん), the garden of Mr. Sankei Hara (原三渓 / はらさんけい) (1868 – 1939), is the perfect match for “Ways to Japan”.

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei Hara was born as Tomitarō Aoki (青木富太郎 / あおきとみたろう) in Gifu (岐阜 / ぎふ) on August 23rd, 1868. He studied business and politics (other sources speak of “politics and law”) at the Tōkyō College (now: Waseda University), and was adopted into the family of the sucessful silk-businessman Zenzaburo Hara (原善三郎 / はらぜんざぶろう). He also married Zenzaburo Hara’s grand daughter.

And to top things: He was made the heir for the Hara estate, took over business from his adoptive father when he died (1899) and achieved considerable wealth through a great deal of business sense (among other location, also within the environment of the “Tomioka Silk Spinners” in Gunma Prefecture, which has been made a World Cultural Heritage in 2014).

In 1915 he became president of “Teikoku Silk” (帝国蚕糸 / ていこくさんし) – and five years later president of the Yokohama Kōshin Bank (横浜興信銀行 / よこはまこうしんぎんこう) (now: Bank of Yokohama (横浜銀行 / よこはまぎんこう).

During this time of success he also presented himself as a patron of the arts (there is quite a number of museums in Japan that still “live on” his collections). However, and that should be of even greater interest for us today, he also transformed his estate in Honmoku (本牧 / ほんもく) in the south of Yokohama (横浜 / よこはま) into a gem that one would not expect at that location: the Sankei-en (三渓園 / さんけいえん) – and expanse of 175,000 sqm and one of the most beautiful landscape parks of Japan.

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Dreistöckige Pagode des ehemalige Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺三重塔)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Three-Story Pagoda of the former Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺三重塔)

More than a hundred years ago (1906), Hara opened the outer part of the garden to the public (at that time it was free of charge for the citizens of Yokohama) – he even provided visitors with wood, stoves and water for their picnics. Today it is one of the gems of Japanese horticulture. And not only that: it is a veritable open-air museum for all those who are interested in traditional Japanese architecture, but don’t want to go through the trouble of a trip Kyōto.

Not only nine “important cultural properties of Japan” are located on the park’s grounds, but also three “trangible cultural assets of the city of Yokohama”. In this garden you can admire buildings that were brought here from all over Japan (in particular from Kyōto, Kamakura and Shirakawagō) and date back as far as the 15th century. In total, there are 17 historical structures (temples, buildings related to historical figures). One of the main attractions of the Sankei-en is the oldest three-story pagoda in the Kantō region.

Let’s have a closer look at some of the buildings.

Inner Garden

This part of the garden was the Hara family’s private “resort” and has its focus on historical buildings that date back to the 16th century.

Jutō Ōidō of the former Tenzui-ji (旧天瑞寺寿塔覆堂 / きゅうてんずいじじゅとうおおいどう) (important cultural property)

A “Jutō” (tower of longevity) is a kind of memorial and burial place to celebrate its longevity of persons already during their lifetime. Hideyoshi Toyotomi (豊臣秀吉 / とよとみひでよし / one of the “unifiers of Japan”) had the Tenzui -ji built in the courtyard of Daitoku-ji in Kyōto in his days, to pray for his mother, who had seriously fallen ill. In gratitude for her recovery, he had the Jutō built in 1592. The building, which was brought here in 1905, is “only” the protective shell of the actual Jutō.

Rinshunkaku (臨春閣 / りんしゅんかく) (important cultural property)

This villa was built in 1649 and has been moved to its current location in 1917. Originally, it was the residence of the “son of the first Tokugawa Shōgun, Ieyasu”, the head of the Kishu Tokugawa clan in Wakayama Prefecture (和歌山県 / わかやまけん). The interiors (which unfortunately can only be viewed from the outside) are characterized by exquisit wall paintings.

Chōshūkaku (聴秋閣 / ちょうしゅうかく) (important cultural property)

It is believed that this building was erected under the third Tokugawa Shōgun, Iemitsu Tokugawa (徳川家光 / とくがわいえみつ), in 1623 on the grounds of Nijo Castle (二条城 / にじょうじょう) in Kyōto (京都 / きょうと). Only a few houses of this architectural style, which is characterized by the fact that it avoids symmetries, are preserved. This one was moved to its present location in 1922.

Gekkaden (月華殿 / げっかでん) (important cultural propery)

Originally built in 1603, die building as a waiting room for visiting daimyo (local feudal lords) on the grounds of the Fushimijō Castle in Kyoto, but brought here in 1918.

Kinmōkutsu (金毛窟 / きんもうくつ)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Kinmōkutsu (金毛窟)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Kinmōkutsu (金毛窟)

This tea arbor was built by Sankei Hara in 1918 and houses a particularly tiny space for tea ceremonies (1 1/3 tatami = 2 square metres). The name of the building refers to a component of the Kinmōkaku of Daitoku-ji in Kyōto, which was used for the construction.

Tenju-in (天授院 / てんじゅいん) (important cultural property)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Tenju-in (天授院)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Tenju-in (天授院)

Originally, the Tenju-in was the hall for the adoration of a Jizō Bosatsu, which was built in 1651 at the Shinpei-ji in Kamakura. The hall was added to the garden in 1916 and is a fine example of a Zen Buddhist building.

Outer Garden

This part of the Sankei-en was opened to the public in 1906 and since 1914 has been dominated by a three-storey pagoda which is some 550 years old. Here seasonal flowers can be admired from spring to summer.

Former Residence of the Hara family, Kakushōkaku (鶴翔閣 / かくしょうかく) (important cultural property)

This building was built in 1902 as a home of the Hara family. With a total floor space of 950 square metres, it not only provided the family with plenty of space, but also for the many diverse guests from culture and politics. After being rebuilt during World War II, the building was restored to its original condition in 2000. Unfortunately, it can not be visited.

Three-Story Pagoda of the former Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺三重塔 / きゅうとうみょうじっさんじゅうのとう) (important cultural property)

The pagoda, built in 1457, once belonged to the Tōmyō-ji (燈明寺 / とうみょうじ) in Kyōto, which dates back to a foundation in 753. In 1914 it was added to the Sankei-en and is therefore considered the oldest surviving pagoda in the Kantō region.

Main Hall of the former Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺本堂 / きゅうとうみょうじほんどう) (important cultural property)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Haupthalle des ehemaligen Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺本堂)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Main Hall of the former Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺本堂)

Like the three-story pagoda, the main hall of the Tōmyō-ji (燈明寺 / とうみょうじ) was built in 1457 in Kyōto. After being damaged there in 1947 by a typhoon, it was disassembled and put into storage. Only in 1986/87 the pagoda was rebuilt here at the Sankei-en.

Buddha Hall of the former Tōkei-ji (旧東慶寺仏殿 / きゅうとうけいじぶつでん) (important cultural propert)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Ehemalige Buddha-Halle des Tōkei-ji (旧東慶寺仏殿)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Buddha Hall of the former Tōkei-ji (旧東慶寺仏殿)

In 1907, the Buddha Hall of the Zen temple, Tōkei-ji (東慶寺 / とうけいじ), founded in 1285 in Kamakura, was brought here. Form and style suggest that the building dates back to the Muromachi period (14th to 16th centuries). The information leaflet of the Sankei-en speaks of a year of construction of 1634.

Former Residence of the Yonahara family, Gasshō Zukuri (合掌造・旧矢箆原家住宅 / がっしょうづくり・きゅうやのはらけじゅうたく) (important cultural property)

From the remote Shirakawa-gō (白川郷 / しらかわごう) in the Gifu prefecture (岐阜県 / ぎふけん) came this residential and farm-house that was built around 1750 in the “gasshō zukuri” style (more details on this type of Japanese farmhouse, please read in my article about Shirakawa-gō). There it had been the residence of the village chief. It is the only historic building in the Sankei-en that can also be entered by visitors. Immerse yourself in the world of these very typical farmhouses. And this is one of the special kind, as its relatively high-quality equipment indicates that the Yonahara family was one of the three most influential in the then Hida province (now Gifu prefecture).

Actually, this building was moved to the garden in 1960, because otherwise it would have been submerged by the construction of a new dam.

On the south side of the garden, there is a so-called “Observatory”, which provides a view of the Tōkyō Bay. This view has changed tremendously since the days of Hara. And not necessarily to its advantage (at least, if you look at it from the point of view of those who want to get into the beauty of Japan). The Yokohama harbour has “grown” around the garden – you have to be capable of a very selective view in order to recognize the former charm.

How to get there:

The Sankei-en may also be less known than you would expect, because it is comparatively difficult to reach. There are direct bus connections from Yokohama station. The easiest way to get there is, however, from the Negishi station (根岸 / ねぎし) of the Keihin Tōhoku line (京浜東北線 / けいひんとうほくせん) (which – as the name suggests – connects Tōkyō with Yokohama). Go to platform 1 of the bus terminal in front of the station and take one of the busses of the lines 58, 99 or 101. The trip from from Negishi to Honmoku (本牧 / ほんもく) takes little more than 10 minutes (at the bus stop in Honmoku you will find a map detailling the area). In Honmoku you cross the Honmoku Dōri (本牧通り / ほんもくどおり) and walk about 10 minutes in a southwesterly direction (on the way there is only one recognizable sign) to the main gate of the Sankei-en.

At the entrance of the Sankei-en you will also find schedules of the local busses – you can plan your way home very comfortably while being in the garden.

Openting hours:

Daily from 9 am to 5 pm (last entry: 4:30 pm)
Closed during the New Year holidays (29th, 30th and 31st of December)

Admission fees:

Adults (15 years and older): 700 Yen (600 Yen for groups of 10 or more persons)
Children (14 years and younger): 200 Yen (100 Yen for groups of 10 or more persons)

There are discounts for senior citizens of Yokohama, persons with physical disabilities (incl. accompanying person). Also books of 5 tickets can be bought for a discounted price.

Annual tickets are available for 2,500 Yen (adults) or 700 Yen respectively (for children and senior citizens of Yokohama).

Parking is available at the main gate of the park (charge).

Rules for the visit of the garden:

  • Pets are not allowed.
  • Smoking is permitted only in designated areas.
  • Do not pick plants or flowers or remove any wildlife from the garden.
  • No eating or drinking in the inner garden.
  • Private use of the buildings and gardens, as well as photography for commercial purposes requires prior approval.
Advertisements

Sankei-en (三渓園) (dt.)

10. September 2019

Klassisches Japan vom Feinsten – und Sie müssen noch nicht mal nach Kyōto dafür reisen

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Dass man auf dieser Webseite immer wieder mal über Orte und Veranstaltungen stolpert, die man nicht erwartet hätte – zumindest nicht dort, wo sie sich befinden – sollte niemanden überraschen. Worüber alle berichten, muss hier nicht noch einmal breitgetreten werden. Dass der Autor kein ausgeprägtes Faible für Kyōto hat, wird sich auch herumgesprochen haben.

Da passt der Sankei-en (三渓園 / さんけいえん), der Garten von Herrn Sankei Hara (原三渓 / はらさんけい) (1868 – 1939), wie die Faust aufs Auge.

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei Hara wurde am 23. August 1868 als Tomitarō Aoki (青木富太郎 / あおきとみたろう) in Gifu (岐阜 / ぎふ) geboren. Er studierte Ökonomie und Politik am Tōkyō College (heute: Waseda Universität), und wurde in die Familie des erfolgreichen Seide-Geschäftsmanns Zenzaburo Hara (原善三郎 / はらぜんざぶろう) adoptiert, dessen Enkelin er heiratete.

Mehr noch: Er wurde als Erbe des Hara-Vermögens bestimmt, führte die Geschäfte nach dem Tod seines Adoptivvaters (1899) fort und gelangte durch viel Sinn für alles Geschäftliche zu beachtlichem Reichtum (u.a. im Umfeld der „Tomioka Seidenspinnere“ in der Präfektur Gunma (群馬県 / ぐんまけん), die Jahre 2014 zum Weltkulturerebe erklärt wurde).

Im Jahre 1915 wurde er Präsident der „Teikoku Silk“ (帝国蚕糸 / ていこくさんし) – fünf Jahre später Präsident der Yokohama Kōshin Bank (横浜興信銀行 / よこはまこうしんぎんこう) (heute: Bank von Yokohama (横浜銀行 / よこはまぎんこう).

In dieser Zeit seines rasanten Aufstiegs tat er sich als Kunstmäzen hervor (viele Museen „leben“ heute noch von seinen Sammlungen). Allerdings – und das ist für uns heute von besonderem Interesse – verwandelte er seinen Besitz an seinem Heimatort (Honmoku / 本牧), im Süden Yokohamas (横浜 / よこはま) gelegen, in ein Kleinod, wie man es dort nicht erwarten würde: Den 175.000 qm großen Sankei-en (三渓園 / さんけいえん) – einen der schönsten Landschaftgärten Japans.

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Dreistöckige Pagode des ehemalige Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺三重塔)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Dreistöckige Pagode des ehemalige Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺三重塔)

Vor über hundert Jahren (1906) öffnete Hara den äußeren Teil dieses Gartens für die Öffentlichkeit (damals auch noch kostenlos für die Bürger Yokohamas) – er stellte den Besuchern sogar Holz, Öfen und Wasser für ihre Picknicks zur Verfügung. Heute zählt er zu den Schmuckstücken japanischen Gartenbaus. Und nicht nur das: Er ist ein regelrechtes Freilicht-Museum für all diejenigen, die sich für traditionelle japanische Architektur interessieren und deswegen nicht gleich die Erschwernisse einer Reise nach Kyōto auf sich nehmen wollen.

Auf dem Parkgelände befinden sich nämlich nicht nur neun „wichtige Kulturgüter Japans“, sondern auch drei „materielle Kulturgüter der Stadt Yokohama“. Die Gebäude, die auf dem Areal bestaunt werden können, datieren bis in das 15. Jahrhundert zurück und wurden aus den unterschiedlichsten Gegenden Japans hierher verbracht (insbesondere aus Kyōto, Kamakura und Shirakawagō). Insgesamt sind es 17 historische Strukturen (Tempel, Gebäude mit Bezug auf historische Persönlichkeiten).
So schmückt sich der Sankei-en u.a. mit der ältesten dreistöckigen Pagode der Kantō-Region.

Einige der Gebäude möchte ich herauspicken.

Innerer Bereich des Gartens

Dieser Teil des Gartens diente der Familie Hara als privates “Rückzugsgebiet” und legt seinen Schwerpunkt auf historische Gebäude, die teilweise auf das 16. Jahrhundert zurückgehen.

Jutō Ōidō des ehemaligen Tenzui-ji (旧天瑞寺寿塔覆堂 / きゅうてんずいじじゅとうおおいどう) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Ein “Jutō” (Turm der Langlebigkeit) ist eine Art Gedenk- und Grabstätte, um schon zu Lebzeiten der Betroffenen und seiner Familien deren Langlebigkeit zu feiern. Hideyoshi Toyotomi (豊臣秀吉 / とよとみひでよし / einer der “Reichseiniger” Japans) hatte seinerzeit den Tenzui-ji im Hof des Daitoku-ji in Kyōto errichten lassen, um dort für seine schwer erkrankte Mutter zu beten. Aus Dank für ihre Genesung hatte er 1592 den Jutō errichten lassen. Bei dem Gebäude hier, das im Jahre 1905 hierher verbracht wurde, handelt es sich “nur” um die schützende Hülle des eigentlichen Jutō.

Rinshunkaku (臨春閣 / りんしゅんかく) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Diese Villa stammt aus dem Jahre 1649 und ist 1917 an ihren heutigen Standort verbracht worden. Ursprünglich war sie die Residenz des “Sohns des ersten Tokugawa Shōgun, Ieyasu”, des Oberhaupts des Kishu Tokugawa-Clans in der Präfektur Wakayama (和歌山県 / わかやまけん). Die Innenräume (die leider nur von außen eingesehen werden können) zeichnen sich besonders durch die kunstvolle Wandbemalung aus.

Chōshūkaku (聴秋閣 / ちょうしゅうかく) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Man geht davon aus, dass dieses Gebäude vom dritten Tokugawa Shōgun, Iemitsu Tokugawa (徳川家光 / とくがわいえみつ), im Jahre 1623 auf dem Gelände des Nijō-Schlosses (二条城 / にじょうじょう) in Kyōto (京都 / きょうと) errichtet wurde. Nur wenige Häuser dieses Baustils, der sich dadurch auszeichnet, dass er Symmetrien vermeidet, sind erhalten. Es wurde 1922 an seinen heutigen Standort gebracht.

Gekkaden (月華殿 / げっかでん) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Ursprünglich war dieses Gebäude 1603 als Warteraum für besuchende Daimyo (lokale Feudalherrscher) auf dem Gelände der Burg Fushimijō in Kyōto errichtet, aber 1918 hierher gebracht worden.

Kinmōkutsu (金毛窟 / きんもうくつ)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Kinmōkutsu (金毛窟)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Kinmōkutsu (金毛窟)

Diese Tee-Laube wurde unter Sankei Hara im Jahre 1918 errichtet und beherbergt einen wirklich winzigen Raum für Teezeremonien (1 1/3 tatami = 2 qm groß). Der Name des Gebäudes bezieht sich auf ein Bauteil des Kinmōkaku des Daitoku-ji in Kyōto, das bei der Errichtung verwendet wurde.

Tenju-in (天授院 / てんじゅいん) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Tenju-in (天授院)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Tenju-in (天授院)

Ursprünglich war der Tenju-in die Halle für die Anbetung eines Jizō Bosatsu, die im Jahre 1651 im Shinpei-ji in Kamakura errichtet worden war. Das Gebäude gelangte 1916 in den Garten und gibt hier ein schönes Beispiel für ein Zen-buddhistisches Gebäude wieder.

Äußerer Bereich des Gartens

Dieser Teil des Sankei-en wurde bereits 1906 der Öffentlichkeit zugänglich gemacht und wird seit 1914 von einer etwa 550 Jahre alten, dreistöckigen Pagode dominiert. Hier können vom Frühjahr bis in den Sommer hinein saisonale Blüten bewundert werden.

Ehemalige Residenz der Hara-Familie, Kakushōkaku (鶴翔閣 / かくしょうかく) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Dieses Gebäude ist 1902 als Wohnhaus der Familie Hara errichtet worden. Mit einer Gesamtwohnfläche von 950 qm bot es nicht nur der Familie reichlich Platz, sondern auch den unterschiedlichsten Gästen aus Kultur und Politik, die Hara hier empfing. Nachdem das Gebäude während des 2. Weltkriegs umgebaut worden war, hat man es im Jahre 2000 wieder in seinen ursprünglichen Zustand versetzt. Leider kann es nicht besichtigt werden.

Dreistöckige Pagode des ehemalige Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺三重塔 / きゅうとうみょうじっさんじゅうのとう) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Die im Jahre 1457 erbaute Pagode gehörte einst zum Tōmyō-ji (燈明寺 / とうみょうじ) in Kyōto, der auf eine Gründung im Jahre 753 zurückgeht. Sie kam 1914 in den Sankei-en und gilt demnach als die älteste erhaltene Pagode in der Kantō-Region.

Haupthalle des ehemaligen Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺本堂 / きゅうとうみょうじほんどう) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Haupthalle des ehemaligen Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺本堂)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Haupthalle des ehemaligen Tōmyō-ji (旧燈明寺本堂)

Wie die dreistöckige Pagode, ist die Haupthalle des Tōmyō-ji (燈明寺 / とうみょうじ) im Jahre 1457 in Kyōto errichtet worden. Nachdem sie dort im Jahre 1947 von einem Taifun beschädigt worden war, hat man sie in ihre Einzelteile zerlegt und zunächst eingelagert und erst 1986/87 hier im Sankei-en wieder aufgebaut.

Ehemalige Buddha-Halle des Tōkei-ji (旧東慶寺仏殿 / きゅうとうけいじぶつでん) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Sankei-en (三渓園) - Ehemalige Buddha-Halle des Tōkei-ji (旧東慶寺仏殿)

Sankei-en (三渓園) – Ehemalige Buddha-Halle des Tōkei-ji (旧東慶寺仏殿)

Im Jahre 1907 brachte man die Buddha-Halle des 1285 gegründeten Zen-Tempels Tōkei-ji (東慶寺 / とうけいじ) in Kamakura hierher. Form und Stil legen nahe, dass das Gebäude aus der Muromachi-Zeit (14. bis 16. Jhdt.) stammt. Das Informations-Faltblatt des Sankei-en spricht von einem Baujahr 1634.

Ehemalige Residenz der Yonahara-Familie, Gasshō Zukuri (合掌造・旧矢箆原家住宅 / がっしょうづくり・きゅうやのはらけじゅうたく) (wichtiges Kulturgut Japans)

Aus dem fernen Shirakawa-gō (白川郷 / しらかわごう) in der Präftektur Gifu (岐阜県 / ぎふけん) kam dieses um 1750 erbaute Wohn- und Farmhaus im “gasshō zukuri”-Stil im Jahre 1960 hierher (weitere Details zu dieser Art des japanischen Farmhauses lesen Sie bitte in meinem Artikel über Shirakawa-gō). Dort war es der Wohnsitz des Ortsvorstehers gewesen. Es ist das einzige historische Gebäude im Sankei-en, dessen Innenräume betreten werden dürfen. Tauchen Sie hier ein in die Welt dieser sehr typischen Farmhäuser. Allerdings ist dieses hier eines der besonderen Art, da seine vergleichsweise hochwertige Ausstattung darauf hinweist, dass die Familie Yonahara zu den drei einflussreichsten in der damaligen Hida-Provinz (heute: Präfektur Gifu) gehört hat.
Das Gebäude ist übrigens durch die Verbringung in den Sankei-en davor bewahrt worden, einem Stausee zum Opfer zu fallen.

Auf der Südseite des Gartens gibt es ein sogenanntes „Observatory“, das den Blick auf die Bucht von Tōkyō freigibt. Diese hat sich seit den Tagen Haras gewaltig verändert. Und nicht unbedingt zu ihrem Vorteil (zumindest, wenn man es vom Standpunkt dessen betrachtet, der sich an der Schönheit Japans berauschen möchte). Um den Garten ist der Hafen von Yokohama „gewuchert“ – man muss schon zu einem sehr selektiven Blick fähig sein, um hier den ehemaligen Liebreiz erkennen zu wollen.

Wie man hinkommt:

Der Sankei-en ist vielleicht auch deswegen unbekannter, als man eigentlich erwarten würde, weil er vergleichsweise schlecht zu erreichen ist. Es gibt direkte Busverbindungen vom Bahnhof Yokohama. Am unkompliziertesten kommt man aber vom Bahnhof Negishi (根岸 / ねぎし) der Keihin Tōhoku-Linie (京浜東北線 / けいひんとうほくせん) (die Tōkyō mit Yokohama verbindet) von Bussteig 1 mit einem der Busse der Linien 58, 99 oder 101 dorthin. Die Fahrtzeit von Negishi nach Honmoku (本牧 / ほんもく) dauert gut 10 Minuten (an der Bushaltestelle dort ist ein übersichtlicher Lageplan vorhanden). In Honmoku überquert man die Honmoku Dōri (本牧通り / ほんもくどおり) und läuft ca. 10 Minuten in südwestlicher Richtung (unterwegs gibt es nur einmal ein erkennbares Hinweisschild) zum Haupttor des Sankei-en.

Im Sankei-en hängen u.a. auch Fahrpläne der örtlichen Busse aus – Sie können also Ihre Rückfahrt noch ganz bequem vom Garten aus planen.

Öffnungszeiten:

Täglich von 9 Uhr bis 17 Uhr (letzter Einlass: 16:30 Uhr)
Geschlossen während der Neujahrsfeiertage (29., 30. und 31. Dezember)

Eintrittsgelder:

Erwachsene (15 Jahre und älter): 700 Yen (600 Yen für 10 und mehr Personen)
Kinder (14 Jahre und jünger): 200 Yen (100 Yen für 10 und mehr Personen)

Es gibt Nachlässe für Senioren mit Wohnsitz in Yokohama, und Behinderte (incl. Begleitperson). Außerdem können fünfer-Blocks Eintrittskarten zum Sonderpreis erworben werden.

Jahreskarten sind für 2.500 Yen (Erwachsene) bzw. 700 Yen (Kinder bzw. Senioren mit Wohnsitz in Yokohama) erhältlich.

Am Haupttor des Parks sind gebührenpflichtige Parkplätze vorhanden.

Regeln für den Parkbesuch:

  • Das Mitbringen von Haustieren ist nicht gestattet.
  • Rauchen ist nur in ausgewiesenen Raucherzonen gestattet.
  • Das Entfernen von Pflanzen und Pflanzenteilen ist nicht gestattet.
  • Essen und Trinken sind im inneren Garten nicht gestattet.
  • Die private Nutzung der Gebäude und des Gartens, sowieso kommerzielle Fotografie erfordern eine vorherige Genehmigung.

Nihonga-Pioniere im Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館)

6. September 2019

Eine Sonderausstellung zum 10. Jubiläum des neuen Museumsgebäudes

Es ist wieder einmal an der Zeit, auf eine Ausstellung im Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館) hinzuweisen – für all diejenigen, die das Museum noch nicht kennen und denen der Begriff “Nihonga” vielleicht auch noch nicht allzu viel sagt, bieten die vorangegangenen Artikel zu dem Thema reichlich Grundlage zum Schmökern und Staunen:

Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館)
– Meisterwerke beweisen die Fortführung einer alten japanischen Tradition

Schöne Frauen im Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館)
– Shōen Uemura und auserlesene “Bijinga” – Gemälde schöner Frauen

Hinweis: Neue Ausstellung im Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館)
– Eine Welt voller Blumen – von der Rimpa-Schule zu zeitgenössischer Kunst

Hinweis: Themen-Ausstellung im Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館)
– Zum 150. Jubiläum von Taikan Yokoyama ― Die Elite der Künstlerwelt Tōkyōs

Yamatane Kunstmuseum – Wasserdarstellungen (山種美術館 – 水を描く)
– Entfliehen Sie der Sommerhitze – eine wahrlich “coole” Ausstellung

Gyoshū Hayami (速水御舟) im Yamatane Kunstmuseum (山種美術館)
– Aus Anlass seines 150. Geburtstages: Die Kunst von Gyoshū Hayami

Vom 31. August bis zum 27. Oktober 2019 gibt es im Yamatane Kunstmuseum eine atemberaubende Ausstellung mit dem Titel: “The Pioneers of Nihonga – Taikan, Shunsō, Gyokudō, and Ryūshi” (大観・春草・玉堂・龍子 ー 日本画のパイオニアー) zu sehen, von der hier ein paar Highlights vorgestellen werden sollen.

Für alle Japankenner wieder ein Hinweis: Hier werden in Buchstaben geschriebene, japanische Namen in der “westlichen” Reihenfolge “Vorname – Familienname” (bzw. nur der Familienname) wiedergegeben.

Taikan Yokoyama (横山大観 / よこやまたいかん), Shunsō Hishida (菱だ春草 / ひしだしゅんそう), Gyokudō Kawai (川合玉堂 / かわばたぎょくどう) und Ryūshi Kawabata (川端龍子 / かわばたりゅうし) sind die Namen, denen man immer wieder begegnet, wenn man in die Zeit der Anfänge von Nihonga vorstößt. Alle vier haben sich auf unterschiedliche Weise um die Etablierung dieser Malkunst verdient gemacht. Aber die Ausstellung huldigt nicht nur den großen Meistern, sondern sie widmet sich u.a. auch den drei glückverheißenden Pflanzen Kiefer, Bambus und Pflaume die in dem japanischen Wort shōchikubai (松竹梅 / しょうちくばい) zusammengefasst werden (松 = Kiefer / 竹 = Bambus / 梅 = Pflaume). (Von diesem fünften Abschnitt dieser Ausstellung liegen mir leider keine Fotos vor).

Die komplette Ausstellung wird übrigens aus dem museumseigenen Fundus des Yamatane Kunstmuseums bestritten.

Durch Anklicken können Sie sich die Bilder in einer höheren Auflösung anschauen.

Abschnitt 1

Shunsō Hishida
(菱田春草 / ひしだしゅんそう)
(1897-1911)

#3
Nach dem Regen
Farbe auf Seide, Meiji-Zeit (etwa 1907)

#4
Der Mond in den vier Jahreszeiten
Tinte und helle Farben auf Seide, Meiji-Zeit (etwa 1909-1910)

Bei dieser Bilderserie hat Hishida mit einer sehr restriktiven Farbpalette gearbeitet – schwarze Tusche, aus Muschelschalen gewonnenes weißes Pigment und Goldfarbe (die Farbwiedergabe hier entspricht leider nicht so recht dem Original).

Und wie bei Ausstellungen im Yamatane Kunstmuseum üblich, hat sich auch diesmal der Konditor von den Exponaten zu kleinen japanischen Süßigkeiten inspirieren lassen. Hier die Köstlichkeit, die das letzte Bild dieser Bilderserie zum Hintergrund hat.

#5
Kuhhirte im Mondschein
Farbe auf Seide, Meiji-Zeit (1910)

 

Abschnitt 2

Taikan Yokoyama
(横山大観 / よこやまたいかん)

(1868-1958)

#10
Sakuemons Haus
Farbe auf Seide mit rückseitigem Blattgold, Taishō-Zeit (1916)

Der Konditor des Museums hat sich von diesem Werk zu folgendem Gaumengenuss hinreißen lassen.

#13
Star (Mynah Bird)
Farbe auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit (1927)

#14
Mt. Fuji
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1933)

Auch dieses Werk Yokoyamas hat seinen Niederschlag in einer japanischen Süßigkeit gefunden.

#16
Drache
Tinte und helle Farben auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1937)

#17
Frühlingsmorgen
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (ca. 1939)

#19
Immerwährend
Farbe auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit (ca. 1943)

#22
Göttlicher Mt. Fuji
Tinte und helle Farben auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1952)

#23
Das Meer im Sommer
Farbe auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit (ca. 1952)

 

Abschnitt 3

Ryūshi Kawabata
(川端龍子 / かわばたりゅうし)

(1885-1966)

#25
Löwe und Pfingstrosen
Farbe auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit (1928)

#26
Strudel von Naruto
Farbe auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit (1929)

Und hier das große Kunstwerk noch einmal ganz in Süß.

#27
Karpfen
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1930)

#28
Mondlicht (nach einem Motiv des Taiyū-in in Nikkō)
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1933)

#32
Japanische Lilien
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1936)

#33
Yatsuhashi – acht-Planken-Brücke im Liniengarten: Eine Szene aus den Erzählungen von Ise
Farbe auf blattvergoldeter Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1945)

 

Abschnitt 4

Gyokudō Kawai
(川合玉堂 / かわばたぎょくどう)

(1873-1957)

#35
Berge und Ströme im Herbst
Farbe auf Seide, Meiji-Zeit (1906)

#37
Rhododendron
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1930)

#38
Kormoranfischerei
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (ca. 1939)

#39
Frühlingsbrise, Frühlingsstrom
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1940)

#41
Nach einem Regenguss in den Bergen
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1943)

#42
Junge Frauen pflanzen Reis aus
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1945)

#43
Klarer Morgen
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1946)

#44
Herbstlandschaft mit bunten Ahornbäumen
Farbe auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (1946)

Und auch das strahlende Herbstlaub hat eine Transformation in ein japanisches Konfekt erfahren.

#45
Verschneite Landschaft am Abend
Tinte und helle Farben auf Papier, Shōwa-Zeit (ca. 1950)

#46
Die Geräusche von Wasser und Regen
Tinte und helle Farben auf Seide, Shōwa-Zeit (ca. 1951)

Und hier noch ein paar Impressionen von den Ausstellungsräumen des Yamatane Kunstmuseums.

Die zu dieser Ausstellung handgefertigen Konfekte noch einmal im Überblick:

Und der Museums-Shop (der auch für Besucher ohne Eintrittskarte für die Ausstellung geöffnet ist) hat sein Angebot natürlich auch um ausstellungsbezogene Artikel erweitert.

Dauer der Ausstellung:

31. August 2019 bis 27. Oktober 2019

Öffnungszeiten:

10 Uhr bis 17 Uhr (letzter Einlass: 16:30 Uhr)

(geschlossen am 17. September, 24. September, 15. Oktober und an Montagen, außer 16. September und 14. Oktober)

Eintrittsgelder:

Erwachsene: 1.200 Yen
Schüler der Oberstufe und Studenten: 900 Yen
Kinder und Schüler bis zur Mittelstufe: Eintritt frei
Behinderte mit Ausweis und eine Begleitperson: Eintritt frei

Für Gruppen von 20 und mehr Personen, für im Vorverkauf erworbene Tickets, für wiederkehrende Besucher dieser Ausstellung und Besucher im Kimono werden Nachlässe gewährt.


Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (Engl.)

3. September 2019

A traffic junction of the different kind

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
A German version of this posting you can find here.

An architectural peculiarity that you’ll hardly find anywhere but in Tōkyō, which also doesn’t seem to make it to the standard guide books, shall be the one we are going to have a closer look at today: A building named “Meguro Sky Garden” (目黒天空庭園 / めぐろてんくうていえん) that has more to offer than one would suspect.

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

This roof garden, that stretches up to 35 meters in an oval from 15 meters above street level, is a (more or less) skilful “masking” of a traffic junction that connects two important major roads of the metropolis:

  • the middle circle (C2) of the Tōkyō City Highway – actually Shuto Kosōsokudōro / 首都 高速 道路 /しゅとこうそくどうろ) (this “middle circle” also includes the longest inner-city road tunnel of the world, the Yamate Tunnel (山 手 ト ネ ル / や ま て ト ン ネ ル), with a total length of 18.2 km

with

  • the Shibuya Line No. 3 (a almost 12 km long highway which begins in the district of Minato (港区 / み な と く) and, via Roppongi (六 本 木 / ろ っ ぽ ん ぎ), reaches southwest beyond the Tamagawa Dōri (玉川通り / たまがわどおり).

The whole complex was opened on March 30, 2013 and honored with the Good Design Award (granted since 1957 by the Japan Institute of Design Promotion) in the same year. In addition, the garden won competitions of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism; in 2013 the city park competition and in 2014 the competition for green roofs.

The roof of this 7,000-square-meter oval complex with a circumference of 400 meters has been transformed into a green landscaped and provides a veritable oasis in the sea of skyscraper of the city. Ample space, not just for a stroll, but also for picnics, relaxation and – on a clear day – a spectacular view of Mt. Fuji (the picture below was taken on a “not-soooo-clear” day in December).

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) with Mt. Fuji

There are more than a thousand trees and bushes – the garden is especially popular during the cherry blossom season. However, it also features beds for vegetables and even pergolas with grapevines (of which acutally wine is made).

And best of all, there is no admission fee for the Sky Garden.

The Meguro Sky Garden is towered by two impressive skyscrapers:

Prism Tower

This commercial and apartment tower was completed in 2009, has 29 storeys (two floors underground, 27 above ground) and 219 residential units. Total height: 98.2 metres.

Prism Tower, Meguro

Prism Tower, Meguro

Prism Tower, Meguro

Prism Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower

This apartment and office building was completed in 2013, has 42 floors, 689 residential units and a total heigth of 156 metres.

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Address:

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)
1-9-2 Ohashi, Meguro-ku

How to get there:

Take the Tōkyū Den’entoshi-Linie (東急田園都市線 / とうきゅうでんえんとしせん) to Ikejiri-Ōhashi (池尻大橋 / いけじりおおはし) – one station from Shibuya station (渋谷 / しぶや). “East” exit (東口 / ひがしぐち).

Finding the entrance to the Meguro Sky Garden requires a bit of navigation. There are, however, several entrances (unfortunately signs are all in Japanese only):

  1. Take the pedestrian bridge crossing the high steets which lead directly to the lower part of the gardens..
  2. There is also an elevator that can be reached via the public offices of the Meguro district – follow the signs below:
    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (Zugang)

    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (access)

    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (Zugang)

    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (access)

  3. There is another elevator access via the northeast side of the Cross Air Tower, close to the post office, and on the 9th floor passing the city admistration offices and the city library, leading directly to the upper region of the roof garden.
  4. And there is yet another elevator that can be accessed from the inner court of the oval, called “Opus Dream Plaza” (オーパス夢広場 / オーパスゆめひろば). This one brings you up to the middle section of the roof garden..
Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) – Opus Dream Plaza” (オーパス夢広場

Opening hours:

Daily from 7 am to 9 pm (depending on the weather, it may happen that the garden remains closed)

Opening hours of the “Opus Dream Plaza“ (オーパス夢広場 / オーパスゆめひろば):
April to October: 7 am to 7 pm
November to March: 7 am to 5 pm
(The plaza itself can also be reserved for use after the official opening hours – so, don’t be surprised, if they don’t let you in, even though the plaza is still in use.)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)


Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (dt.)

31. August 2019

Ein Verkehrsknotenpunkt mal ganz anders

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Eine architektonische Besonderheit, die es in der Form wahrscheinlich auch nur in Tōkyō gibt, die es dennoch selten in die einschlägigen Reiseführer schafft, wollen wir uns heute mal ein bisschen genauer anschauen: Einen Komplex, der hinter dem Namen „Meguro Sky Garden“ (目黒天空庭園 / めぐろてんくうていえん) mehr verbirgt, als man vermuten würde.

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Bei dem sich in einem Oval von 15 Metern über Straßenniveau auf 35 Meter hinaufschraubenden Dachgarten handelt es sich um eine (mehr oder weniger) geschickte „Maskierung“ eines Verkehrsknotenpunkts, der zwei wichtige Hauptverkehrsstraßen der Metropole miteinander verbindet:

  • den mittleren Ring (C2) der Stadtautobahn von Tōkyō – eigentlich Shuto Kosōsokudōro / 首都高速道路 / しゅとこうそくどうろ) (zu diesem „mittleren Ring“ gehört auch der längste innerstädtische Straßentunnel der Welt, der Yamate Tunnel (山手トンネル / やまてトンネル), mit einer Gesamtlänge von 18,2 km

mit

  • der Shibuya-Linie Nr. 3 (eine knapp 12 km lange Autobahnstrecke die im Bezirk Minato (港区 / みなとく) beginnt und über Roppongi (六本木/ ろっぽんぎ) bis über die Tamagawa Dōri (玉川通り / たまがわどおり) hinaus reicht.

Eröffnet wurde die ganze Anlage am 30. März 2013 und auch im gleichen Jahr schon mit dem Good Design Award (der seit 1957 vom „Japan Institute of Design Promotion“ vergeben wird) geehrt. Außerdem gewann der Garten Wettbewerbe des Ministeriums für Land, Infrastruktur, Transport und Tourismus; im Jahre 2013 den Stadtpark-Wettbewerb und 2014 den Wettbewerb für Dachbegrünung.

Das Dach dieses 7.000 Quadratmeter großen ovalen Komplexes mit einem Umfang von 400 Metern ist begrünt und stellt eine regelrechte Oase im Hochhausmeer der Großstadt darf. Hier kann man nicht einfach nur lustwandeln, sondern auch Picknick machen, ausspannen und – an klaren Tagen – den Blick auf den Fuji-san genießen.

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) mit Fuji-san

Hier wachsen über 1.000 Bäume – besonders beliebt ist der Garten während der Kirschblüte. Es gibt allerdings auch Beete mit Gemüse und zwei Lauben mit Weinreben (von denen tatsächlich auch Wein hergestellt wird).

Und was das Beste ist: Der Eintritt in den Sky Garden ist frei

Überragt wird der Meguro Sky Garden von zwei beeindruckenden Hochhausbauten:

Prism Tower

Ein im Jahre 2009 fertiggestelltes 29-stöckiges Geschäfts- und Appartement-Hochhaus (zwei unterirdische Stockwerke, 27 oberirdische Stockerwerke) mit 219 Wohneinheiten. Höhe: 98,2 Meter.

Prism Tower, Meguro

Prism Tower, Meguro

Prism Tower, Meguro

Prism Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower

Ein im Jahre 2013 fertiggestelltes 42-stöckiges Appartement- und Büro-Hochaus, mit 689 Wohneinheiten. Höhe: 156 Meter.

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Cross Air Tower, Meguro

Adresse:

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)
1-9-2 Ohashi, Meguro-ku

Wie man hinkommt:

Mit der Tōkyū Den’entoshi-Linie (東急田園都市線 / とうきゅうでんえんとしせん) nach Ikejiri-Ōhashi (池尻大橋 / いけじりおおはし) – eine Station vom Bahnhof Shibuya (渋谷 / しぶや) entfernt. Ausgang „Ost“ (東口 / ひがしぐち).

Das Auffinden des Eingangs zum Meguro Sky Garden erfordert ein wenig Navigationstalent. Es gibt allerdings mehrere Zugänge (die aber ausschließlich japanisch beschriftet sind):

  1. Über einen Steg unter den Hochstraßen gelangt man direkt in den unteren Bereich des Gartens.
  2. Über einen Aufzug, der über den Zugang zu den Ämtern des Bezirks Meguro führen – lassen Sie sich von folgenden Schildern leiten:
    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (Zugang)

    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (Zugang)

    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (Zugang)

    Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) (Zugang)

  3. Über einen Aufzug, der sich auf der Nordostseite des Komplexes in der Nähe des Postamts befindet und in den 9. Stock führt und dort, vorbei an Büros der Stadtverwaltung und der Stadtbibliothek, direkt zum höchsten Punkt des Gartens bringt.
  4. Es gibt einen weiteren Aufzug, der sich im Innenhof des Ovals, in der “Opus Dream Plaza” (オーパス夢広場 / オーパスゆめひろば) befindet und direkt in den mittleren Abschnitt des Dachgartens führt.
Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園) – Opus Dream Plaza” (オーパス夢広場

Öffnungszeiten:

Täglich von 7 Uhr bis 21 Uhr (Witterungseinflüsse können dazu führen, dass der Park geschlossen bleibt)

Öffnungszeiten der „Opus Dream Plaza“ (オーパス夢広場 / オーパスゆめひろば):
April bis Oktober: 7 Uhr bis 19 Uhr
November bis März: 7 Uhr bis 17 Uhr
(kann auch nach den offiziellen Öffnungszeiten reserviert werden)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)

Meguro Sky Garden (目黒天空庭園)


The New Wholesale Markets of Toyosu (豊洲市場)

21. August 2019

The new “belly” of Tōkyō

A German version of this posting you can find here.
Eine deutsche Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場)

Toyosu Wholesale Markets (豊洲市場)

Tōkyō as the heart of the currently largest metropolitan region in the world (38 million people are packed here in comparatively small area) – and at the same time as one that has dedicated itself to the delights of the palate (hardly anywhere else in the world you will find such a diverse multitude of restaurants and pubs) – faces the daily challenge to provide these people with fresh food. And when you say “fresh” in Japan, that usually means “immaculate”. Speed and cleanliness are the magic words here.

Tokyos Fischmarkt in der Meiji-Zeit

Tokyo’s fish market at the Meiji era

Tokyos Märkte in der frühen Showa-Zeit

Tokyo’s markets at the early Showa era

Fischmarkt von Tsukiji (築地市場) - Januar 2015

The old fish market of Tsukiji (築地市場) – January 2015

When it became clear that the old market places of Tsukiji (築 地 / つ き じ) could not be used for all eternity (opened 1935), the governor Tōkyō of repeatedly demanded a new building for this purpuose (the enthusiasm for this endeavour seemed to have been limited), it took quite some time, until a new market complex was built (allegedly, the construction cost was about five Billion Euros) on the artificially created island of Toyosu (豊 洲 / と よ す), which was previously the site of gas works. To set up a trade complex for fresh produce (seafood, fruits and vegetables) where gas works used to be … That’ll sound alarm bells for some of you. And so they did in Tōkyō – but only after it was practically too late: Shortly before the planned relocation of the market in November 2016, it became clear: The grounds are contaminated to an inadmissible extent. And in such situations, not only old Zeus would have wondered what to do (I know, I know, that is a wortspiel, probably only Germans will understand). The answer was: Decontaminate, check, decontaminate, ckeck again – and finally declare the building harmless. The move into the new complex was not executed before October 2018 – with a grand opening ceremony on October 11, 2018.
Or with other words: The postponement may have been a shame for the Japanese, but it did not in any way endanger Germany’s leading role in the capabiliy for large-scale projects… Compared with a major airport in the metropolitan area of ​​Berlin, which shall not to be mentioned by name, the markets of Toyosu were delivered practically on time…

So much for the introduction.

With the new building, however, planning was going not just far beyond tomorrow, but (as it says in the glossy brochures) as far as into the next five decades. The purpose of the market is not only to ensure the distribution of large quantities of fresh food, but also to ensure the stability of food prices – as did the markets of Tsukiji (and of course the other wholesale markets in the city as well). With the new market place also the requirements of manufacturers, consumers and customers were considered. Food security and efficient distribution are supported here by means that were not available in Tsukiji. Just think of the sweltering summer heat that the fresh goods in Tsukiji were vulnerable to – in Toyosu the trading and loading halls are air-conditioned.

However, it seems that the rather sterile style of new markets is struggling just a bit with one of its other principles: “To continue and develop a tradition for which the market in Tsukiji was famous”. Even some of the market workers don’t really sound too happy about the new working environment, when they miss the quirkiness and quaintness of the old market of Tsukiji. Obviously, air-conditioned work halls alone are no substitute for this.

Nevertheless, tourist visitors are flocking to the new market as well – although its construction hardly allows any direct contact with actual trade (which should be explicitly welcomed here – a market is a workplace and not a playground for tourists – at least to my mind). It is true that large auditorium stands have been set up in the wholesale and auction halls to let the visitor “watch”. But it’s a rather “remote” way of being “part of it”. The hall for the intermediary wholesale market,  that probably made up for the biggest tourist attraction in Tsukiji, has been enhanced with a large museum area and a section where everything can be bought for kitchen, cooking and market needs, but the windows that open the view into the commercial lanes, cannot really provide the “market feeling” the old market was famous for. Whether this will be compensated by additional facilities that are presently under way under the project name “Senkyaku Banrai Facility”, which is deemed to attract visitors like they were attracted by the markets in Tsukiji, remains to be seen. By 2023 block 6 (where the seafood intermediate trade takes place) will let us know whether this “senkyaku banrai (千客万来 / せんきゃくばんらい) can really be translated with “large crowds of guests or customers”.

The total area of Toyosu’s markets is 407,000 square meters – about twice the area previously occupied at Tsukiji.

The whole market complex can be subdived into the following components:

Block 5 – Fruits and vegetable markets (southeastern part of the complex)

This block houses restaurants on its ground floor and a galery on the first floor, that provides (protected by glas windows) a view into the intermediate and wholesale market. If you want to witness what’s happening here during the wholesale hours, you have to be fairly ealry. Dealing starts at 6:30 am.

Block 6 Intemediate wholesale market for seafood / roof garden (northwestern part of the complex)

The ground floow of this building is reserved for professional dealers. Visitors have no access.
At the level you’d approach when coming from the Shijōmae station (“3rd floor” according to the Japanese way of counting – depending on your home country you may call it “2nd floor”) you’ll find 22 restaurants of various types – with an emphasis on seafood, naturally.

On the same level, in the main building of this market complex, there are museum-like, wide aisles that provide everything you need to know about fishing and trading in Japan.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6

Toyosu Markets (豊洲市場) – Block 6

There are some larger windows which open a view down two storeys to the actual dealers’ lanes. But don’t expect to gain too much of a “sense of trade” by peeping into these rather narrow aisles.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6

Toyosu Markets (豊洲市場) – Block 6

The top floor houses about 70 different stores with market-related goods that are also available to visitors for shopping. Here you will find e.g. dried fish, kitchen knives, shoes and other utensils of market workers. This shopper’s paradise is called “Uogashi Yokochō” (Fish Market Lane).

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6 (Uogashi Yokochō)

Toyosu Markets (豊洲市場) – Block 6 (Uogashi Yokochō)

And if you did not find all that impressive, then be sure to visit the roof garden of the building. This is not only an area of an unexpectedly extensive green expanse. From here you also have one of the most breathtaking views of parts of Tōkyō’s skyline with Odaiba and Raibow Bridge in the southwest and west, the Tōkyō Tower in the west and the new Olympic Village in the northwest.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6 (Dachgarten)

Toyosu Markets (豊洲市場) – Block 6 (Roof Garden)

And while we are talking about “green”: There is an elevator from the roof garden of block 6 that will bring you down to street level to the “Gururi Park“, which covers the entire outskirts of the market complex. Here you can not only stroll comfortably, but also barbecue (the utensils and the respective spaces can be rented).

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場)

Toyosu Markets (豊洲市場)

Block 7 Wholesale Market for Seafood / Facility Management (southwestern part of the complex).

From the street level you can take an elevator up to the 3rd (Japanese) floor of the facility management building. There are 12 market-oriented restaurants and the PR center of the market complex.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 7

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) – Block 7

A connecting bridge leads to the section of block 7, which on the one hand offers subject-specific information on fishing and trade in Japan, and on the other hand also a glassed-in gallery, which provides views into the huge trading halls.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 7

Toyosu Markets (豊洲市場) – Block 7

Registered visitors have the opportunity to attend the morning tuna auctions (120 visitors at a time are granted access to a viewing platform for 10 minutes) – registrations via the following link:

https://www.pia.co.jp/ssl/cgi-bin/genform/form.cgi?ptn=toyosu

Please note that registered visitors must identify themselves – access is limted to those individuals registered (either via internet or phone).
Non-registered visitors can also watch the auction but from the gallery on the 3rd floor.
The auctions usually take place between 5:30 o’clock and 6:30 o’clock in the morning.

Opening hours:

Weekdays (closed on Sundays, public holidays and other days without commercial activity): 5:00 am to 5:00 pm.

Hence, before you go to Toyosu to visit the markets, check the English-language website of the market:

http://www.shijou.metro.tokyo.jp/english/toyosu/

How to get there:

Take the Yurikamome (ゆりかもめ) line to Shijōmae station (市場前 / しじょうまえ) either from Toyosu (豊洲 / とよす) or from Shinbashi (新橋 / しんばし) across the island of Odaiba (お台場 / おだいば).
There are also Toei-busses to the bus stops “Toyosu Market” and “Shijōmae Ekimae”.

Further reading:

The former fish market of Tsukiji (築 地 市場)
– An obituary for a “semicircle of great activity”

The Flower Market of Ōta (大田市場の「花市場」)
– Japan’s central wholesale market for fower auctions


Die neuen Großmärkte von Toyosu (豊洲市場)

15. August 2019

Der neue Bauch von Tōkyō

Eine englische Version dieses Artikels finden Sie hier.
An English version of this posting you can find here.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場)

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場)

Tōkyō als Herzstück der derzeit größten Metropolregion der Welt (hier ballen sich 38 Millionen Menschen auf vergleichsweise engem Raum) – und gleichzeitig noch als eine, die sich den Gaumengenüssen ganz besonders verschrieben hat (kaum irgendwo sonst ist das Nahrungs- und Genussmittelangebot, die Auswahl an Restaurants und Kneipen so vielfältig) – steht natürlich täglich vor der Herausforderung, diese Menschen mit frischen Nahrungsmitteln zu versorgen. Und wenn man in Japan „frisch“ sagt, dann heißt das meistens auch „makellos“. Geschwindigkeit und Sauberkeit sind hier die Zauberwörter.

Tokyos Fischmarkt in der Meiji-Zeit

Tokyos Fischmarkt in der Meiji-Zeit

Tokyos Märkte in der frühen Showa-Zeit

Tokyos Märkte in der frühen Showa-Zeit

Fischmarkt von Tsukiji (築地市場) - Januar 2015

Fischmarkt von Tsukiji (築地市場) – January 2015

Als es klar wurde, dass die alten Markt-Stätten von Tsukiji (築地 / つきじ) auch beim besten Willen nicht mehr bis in alle Ewigkeiten genutzt werden konnten (eröffnet 1935) und der damalige Gouverneur Tōkyōs wiederholt einen Neubau für dieselben gefordert hat (die Begeisterung hierfür schien sich in Grenzen gehalten zu haben), hat man auf einem Areal auf der künstlich geschaffenen Insel von Toyosu (豊洲 / とよす), das davor der Standort eines Gaswerks war, den neuen Marktkomplex errichtet (angeblich betrugen die Baukosten umgerechnet rund fünf Milliarden Euro). Einen Handelskomplex für Frischwaren (Meeresfrüchte, Obst und Gemüse) dort zu errichten, wo früher ein Gaswerk stand… Da werden bei einigen die Alarmglocken angehen. Das taten sie in Tōkyō auch – allerdings erst, nachdem es praktisch schon zu spät war: Kurz vor dem geplanten Umzug des Marktes im November 2016 wurde klar: Der Untergrund ist in unzulässigem Maße verseucht. Und in solchen Situationen fragt sich nicht nur der alte Zeus: Was tun? Die Antwort war: Dekontaminieren, messen, dekontaminieren, messen – und schließlich das Gebäude für unbedenklich erklären. Wirklich bezogen wurde der neue Komplex erst im Oktober 2018 – mit einer großen Eröffnungszeremonie am 11. Oktober 2018. Wer sich also schon gefreut hat, Japanern ähnliche Großprojektfähigkeiten wie den Deutschen zuzusprechen, hat sich zu früh gefreut. Verglichen mit einem namentlich nicht genannt werden sollenden Großflughafen im Großraum Berlin wurden die Märkte von Toyosu praktisch pünktlich bezogen…

So viel zur Einleitung.

Mit dem Neubau hat man allerdings auch nicht nur an morgen gedacht, sondern (so steht es in den Hochglanzbroschüren) für die kommenden 50 Jahre gleich mit. Der Markt soll damit nicht nur die Verteilung von großen Mengen frischer Nahrungsmittel sicherstellen, sondern auch deren preisliche Stabilität – wie es die Märkte von Tsukiji (und natürlich die anderen Großmärkte in der Stadt ebenso) bis vor einem Jahr getan haben. Beim Neubau sei auch an die Anforderungen der Hersteller, der Verbraucher und der Kunden gedacht worden. Nahrungsmittelsicherheit und effiziente Verteilung werden hier mit Mitteln gefördert, die in Tsukiji nicht zur Verfügung standen. Man denke nur an die brütende Sommerhitze, der die frischen Waren in Tsukiji schutzlos ausgeliefert waren – in Toyosu werden die Handels- und Verladehallen klimatisiert.

Mit einer weiteren Maxime des Neubaus tut sich der Markt aber (wie es auf den Unbedarften zu wirken vermag) etwas schwer: Das Fortführen und Entwickeln einer Tradition, für die der Markt in Tsukiji berühmt war. Selbst von Seiten der Arbeiter auf dem Fischmarkt hört man immer wieder, dass sie voller Sehnsucht an die Schrulligkeit des Markets von Tsukiji denken. Offensichtlich sind klimatisierte Arbeitshallen kein Ersatz hierfür.

Immerhin strömen die touristischen Besucher auf den neuen Markt – wenngleich dieser kaum noch direkten Kontakt mit dem Handelsgeschehen zulässt (was an dieser Stelle ausdrücklich begrüßt werden soll – ein Markt ist Arbeitsplatz und nicht Spielwiese für Touristenhorden). Man hat zwar in den Großhandels- und Auktionshallen große Zuschauertribünen eingerichtet, die den Besucher „zuschauen“ lassen. Wirklich „dabei“ ist man von dort aus allerdings nicht. Die Halle für die Zwischenhändler, die in Tsukiji wahrscheinlich die größte Touristenattraktion ausgemacht hat, ist zwar mit einem großen musealen Bereich versehen worden, auch kann hier alles für den Küchen- und Kochbedarf gekauft werden, aber die Fenster, die den Blick in die Handelsgassen freigeben, können kein echtes „Marktgefühl“ aufkommen lassen. Ob dies mit den Bauvorhaben unter dem Projektnamen „Senkyaku Banrai Facility“ ausgeglichen werden kann, das bis 2023 im Block 6 (dort wo der Zwischenhandel mit Meeresfrüchten stattfindet) für eine Fortführung der „publikumswirksamen“ Funktionen des Markts von Tsukiji sorgen soll, wird man sehen müssen. Dieses Senkyaku Banrai (千客万来 / せんきゃくばんらい) heißt sinngemäß übersetzt „großer Andrang von Gästen oder Kunden“.

Das gesamte Areal der Märkte von Toyosu umfassen 407.000 m² – also ungefähr das Doppelte, der seinerzeit in Tsukiji belegten Fläche.

Die Anlage kann grob in folgende Teile untergliedert werden.

Block 5 – Obst- und Gemüsemärkte (südöstlicher Teil der Anlage)

Hier gibt es im Erdgeschoss Restaurants und ein Geschäft und im 1. OG eine verglaste Besuchergalerie, die zu nächst einen Blick in den Zwischen-Großhandelsmarkt gestattet und zu einer großen (ebenfalls verglasten) Zuschauerhalle führt, von der aus man das Treiben im Obst- und Gemüse-Großhandel beobachten kann – hierzu ist allerdings frühes Erscheinen unverzichtbar: Der Handel dauert an den Markttagen nur etwa eine Stunde und beginnt schon morgens um 6:30 Uhr.

Block 6 Zwischen-Großhandelsmarkt für Meeresfrüchte / Dachgarten (nordwestlicher Teil der Anlage)

Das Erdgeschoss der Anlage ist dem Markttreiben vorbehalten. Hier haben Besucher keinen Zutritt.
Auf der Ebene des Zugangs vom Bahnhof Shijōmae (2. OG, „3rd floor“ nach japanischer Zählweise) befinden sich 22 Restaurants verschiedener Art – selbstverständlich mit einem eindeutigen Schwerpunkt auf Meeresfrüchten.

Auf der gleichen Ebene befinden sich im Haupt-Handelsgebäude museal eingerichtete, großzüge Zugänge, die alles Wissenswerte über den Fischfang und -Handel in Japan vermitteln.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) – Block 6

Über einige größere Fenster kann man in die zwei Stockwerke tiefer liegenden Händlergassen blicken. Machen Sie sich aber keine allzu großen Hoffnungen darauf, über diese schmalen Blick-Kanäle wirklich ein Gefühl für das Handelstreiben entwickeln zu können.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) – Block 6

Im obersten Stockwerk sind ungefähr 70 verschiedene Geschäfte mit Markt-bezogenen Waren untergebracht, die auch den Besuchern zum Einkauf offenstehen. Hier finden Sie z.B. getrocknete Fische, Küchenmesser, Schuhe und andere Utensilien der Marktarbeiter. Dieses Einkaufsparadies nennt man „Uogashi Yokochō“ (Fischmarkt-Gässchen).

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6 (Uogashi Yokochō)

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) – Block 6 (Uogashi Yokochō)

Und falls Sie all das nicht sonderlich eindrucksvoll fanden, dann gönnen Sie sich auf jeden Fall einen Besuch des Dachgartens des Gebäudes. Hier breiten sich nämlich nicht nur unerwartet weitläufige Grünflächen aus, sondern von hier aus hat man auch einen der atemberaubendsten Blicke auf einen Teil der Skyline Tōkyōs mit Odaiba und der Raibow Bridge im Südwesten und Westen, dem Tōkyō Tower im Westen und dem neuen olympischen Dorf im Nordwesten.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 6 (Dachgarten)

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) – Block 6 (Dachgarten)

Und wo wir schon beim „Grün“ sind: Vom Dachgarten des Blocks 6 kommen Sie mit einem Aufzug hinunter auf Straßenniveau, wo sich der „Gururi Park“, der den kompletten Märkte-Komplex umfasst, ausbreitet. Hier lässt’s sich nicht nur gemütlich flanieren, sondern auch Barbecue machen (die Utensilien hierzu und die entsprechenden Stellplätze können gemietet werden).

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場)

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場)

Block 7 Großhandelsmarkt für Meeresfrüchte / Gebäudemanagement (südwestlicher Teil der Anlage).

Vom Straßenniveau kommt man mit einem Aufzug hinauf ins 3. (japanische) OG des Gebäudes für das Gebäudemanagement. Dort befinden sich 12 marktbezogene Restaurants und das PR-Zentrum des Marktkomplexes.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 7

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) – Block 7

Über eine Verbindungsbrücke gelangt man in den Teil des Blocks 7, der einerseits fachbezogene Informationen zum Fischfang- und Handel in Japan bietet, andererseits aber auch eine verglaste Zuschauergalerie, die den Blick in die riesigen Handelshallen freigibt.

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) - Block 7

Toyosu Großmärkte (豊洲市場) – Block 7

Angemeldete Besucher haben die Möglichkeit den morgendlichen Thunfischversteigerungen beizuwohnen (jeweils 120 Besucher werden hierzu für je 10 Minuten auf eine Aussichtsplattform gelassen) – Anmeldungen über folgenden Link: https://www.pia.co.jp/ssl/cgi-bin/genform/form.cgi?ptn=toyosu
Bitte beachten Sie, dass angemeldete Besucher sich vor Ort ausweisen müssen und die über Internet oder Telefon reservierten Zutrittserlaubnisse personenbezogen sind.
Nicht angemeldete Besucher können die Versteigerung aber natürlich auch von der verglasten Zuschauergalerie auch beobachten.
Die Versteigerungen finden handelstäglich meist zwischen 5:30 Uhr und 6:30 Uhr morgens statt.

Öffnungszeiten:

Wochentags (geschlossen an Sonn- und Feiertagen und anderen Tagen ohne Handelstätigkeit): 5 Uhr bis 17 Uhr.

Bevor Sie sich also auf den Weg nach Toyosu machen, um die Märkte zu besuchen, machen Sie sich über die englischsprachige Webseite des Marktes kundig:
http://www.shijou.metro.tokyo.jp/english/toyosu/

Wie man hinkommt:

Mit der Yurikamome (ゆりかもめ)-Linie zum Bahnhof Shijōmae (市場前 / しじょうまえ) entweder von Toyosu (豊洲 / とよす) aus, oder vom Bahnhof Shinbashi (新橋 / しんばし) quer über die Insel Odaiba (お台場 / おだいば).
Oder mit dem Toei-Bus zu den Haltestellen „Toyosu Market“ und „Shijōmae Ekimae“

Weitere Informationen:

Der ehemalige Fischmarkt von Tsukiji (築地市場)
– Ein Nachruf auf ein “Halbrund großer Geschäftigkeit”

Der Blumenmarkt von Ōta (大田市場の「花市場」)
– Japans zentraler Großhandelsmarkt für Blumenauktionen